Navy Withholding Data on UFO Sightings, Congressman Says

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Article by Bryan Bender                    September 6, 2019                      (politico.com)

• US Representative Mark Walker (R-NC) (pictured above), the ranking member of the Intelligence and Counter-terrorism subcommittee for the House Homeland Security Committee, is accusing the US Navy of withholding information about reports of UFOs after officially requesting more data on the Navy’s mysterious encounters.

• In July 2019, Walker asked Navy Secretary Richard V. Spencer to outline what resources the Navy is dedicating to investigating the sightings, whether the Navy had found “physical evidence” to substantiate the claims, and whether any foreign nations or private companies have developed breakthrough technologies that could explain these UAPs, i.e.: ‘unidentified aerial phenomena’.

• Navy Undersecretary Thomas Modly responded in a brief letter on July 31st that “the Department of the Navy takes these reports very seriously and continues to log sightings and fully investigate the accounts.” Modly noted the proliferation and availability of inexpensive unmanned aerial “drones”. The Navy “continues to dedicate resources to the tracking and investigation of reports that could affect the safety of our aircrews.” Walker wasn’t satisfied with this response. Citing reports of UAPs traveling at speeds and making maneuvers well beyond what is believed to be technologically possible, which a drone cannot do, Walker expressed concern that the UFO craft could pose a threat to US forces or territory.

• Navy spokesperson Joe Gradisher responded that the Navy is prepared to accommodate any further congressional requests for information. “At this point in time,” said Gradisher,” we have not received any new requests for updates on this issue.”

• Congressional interest in the UFO reports has grown since revelations that the Pentagon had investigated the sightings through a program established by former Sen. Harry Reid of Nevada. Among the revelations were sightings reported by pilots and personnel of the USS Nimitz and the USS Theodore Roosevelt battlegroups in 2004, 2015 and 2016, including footage of unknown aircraft exhibiting flight characteristics that defy known aerodynamic properties. The Pentagon also financed a series of theoretical studies to try to explain how the aircraft might operate — ranging from “Detection and High Resolution Tracking of Vehicles at Hypersonic Velocities” to “Warp Drive, Dark Energy, and the Manipulation of Extra Dimensions.”

• In a recent interview, Walker wondered whether the Pentagon’s Advanced Aerospace Identification Program set up by Reid was truly ended in 2012. Where is the documentation? If the program has clandestinely continued, where are the resources coming from? Walker’s concern is that a potential adversary like Russia or China could already have this advanced aerospace technology.

• Walker, a former pastor, acknowledged that he is open to the possibility that the answers could change how humanity perceives the known universe. What does the US government or military know that “the rest of us don’t?” asked Walker. “I certainly have an open mind to see where this leads us.”

 

A top Republican on the House Homeland Security Committee is accusing the Navy of withholding information about reports of unidentified aircraft after officially requesting more data on the mysterious encounters.

Rep. Mark Walker of North Carolina, the ranking member of the Intelligence and Counterrorism subcommittee, asked Secretary Richard V. Spencer in July to outline what resources the Navy is dedicating to investigating the sightings. He also asked if officials have found “physical evidence” to substantiate the claims, and whether they are aware of any foreign nations or private companies that have introduced breakthrough technologies that could explain them.

Navy Undersecretary Thomas Modly responded in a brief letter on July 31 that “the Department of the Navy takes these reports very seriously and continues to log sightings and fully investigate the accounts,” according to a copy provided to POLITICO.

But Walker said he is discouraged by the Navy’s seeming unwillingness to provide his committee with more data about the so-called unidentified aerial phenomena — the term the Pentagon prefers over the more traditional “unidentified flying objects,” or UFOs. He has expressed concern publicly that the craft could pose a threat to U.S. forces or territory.
“While I am encouraged the Under Secretary of the Navy confirmed that UAP encounters are fully investigated, there is frustration with the lack of answers to specific questions about the threat that superior aircraft flying in United States airspace may pose,” Walker told POLITICO in a statement.

Navy spokesperson Joe Gradisher responded that the service is prepared to accommodate any further congressional requests for information. “At this point in time, however, we have not received any new requests for updates on this issue,” he said by email.

Congressional interest in the unidentified aircraft reports has grown since revelations by POLITICO and other news outlets in late 2017 that the Pentagon had investigated the sightings through a program established a decade earlier by former Sen. Harry Reid of Nevada.

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Trump Launches Space Command: Will They Fight Aliens And UFOs?

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Article by Arthur Villasanta                      August 30, 2019                      (ibtimes.com)

• On August 29th, President Trump announced the reactivation of the United States Space Command at a White House ceremony. But the new command of the US Armed Forces won’t be fighting invading aliens or UFOs. The US Space Command is designed to meet the threat presented to U.S. military satellites by the increasingly sophisticated anti-satellite capabilities of Russia and China. Said President Trump, “Those who wish to harm the United States, to seek to challenge us on the ultimate high ground of space, it’s going to be a whole different ballgame.”

• The US Space Command was originally established in 1985 to coordinate the use of outer space by the United States Armed Forces, but was stood down in 2002. In 2018, the Department of Defense (DoD) announced the US Space Command would be reestablished as the eleventh unified combatant command under the DoD, similar in status to US Special Operations Command, US Cyber Command, US Pacific Command and US Central Command.

• The 2019 National Defense Authorization Act, signed into law in 2018, directed the reestablishment of the US Space Command under the US Strategic Command. But in December 2018, President Trump directed that the US Space Command be re-established as a full ‘unified combatant command’ with full responsibilities for fighting wars in space. It is seen as a predecessor to Trump’s US Space Force, which will ultimately become the sixth military service in the armed forces, similar to the US Army and US Navy.

• US Air Force General John W. Raymond is the current Commander of the Air Force Space Command, and he will concurrently command the US Space Command as well. Said General Raymond, “We no longer have the luxury of treating space superiority as a given. There is a growing threat. The scope, scale and complexity is concerning.” General Raymond listed the threats that the US Space Command will deal with, including jamming of GPS communication satellites, directed energy weapons, and ground to satellite missiles which China demonstrated in 2007.

 

The defunct United States Space Command (USSPACECOM) was reactivated as a unified combatant command (UCC) of the Department of Defense (DoD) in ceremonies presided over by President Donald Trump at the White House on Thursday.

Air Force General John W. Raymond

USSPACECOM becomes the 11th UCC of the United States Armed Forces. This designation makes it similar in stature to other UCCs such as U.S. Special Operations Command, U.S. Cyber Command, U.S. Pacific Command and U.S. Central Command.

Gen. John W. Raymond, USAF, is Commander of USSPACECOM. He is also the concurrent Commander of Air Force Space Command, which is a separate command from USSPACECOM.

USSPACECOM was originally established in 1985 to coordinate the use of outer space by the United States Armed Forces but was stood down in 2002. In 2018, DoD announced USSPACECOM would be reestablished as a unified combatant command.

“We no longer have the luxury of treating space superiority as a given,” said Gen. Raymond on Thursday.
“There is a growing threat. The scope, scale and complexity is concerning.”

1:27 minute video of President Trump’s Space Command ceremony (Washington Post)

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Esper Affirms Support for U.S. Space Command and for an Independent Space Force

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Article by Sandra Erwin                  August 28, 2019              (spacenews.com)

• On August 28th, in his first news conference as defense secretary, Mark Esper (standing alongside Chairman of the Joint Chief of Staff Gen. Joseph Dunford in image above) endorsed the US Space Command as the “next crucial step” in the Pentagon’s reorganization of space forces “to ensure the protection of America’s interests in space.”

• Esper also voiced support for the creation of an independent Space Force as a branch of the armed forces. But the DoD cannot move forward on the establishment of a Space Force branch of the military until Congress authorizes it. Congress is on recess until September 9th . Sources told SpaceNews that DoD officials met with congressional committee staffers over the August recess to discuss Space Force legislation.

• The Pentagon is pushing back on the Senate version of the National Defense Authorization Act, which re-designates the Air Force Space Command as the U.S. Space Force without revising Title 10 of the U.S. Code to establish a new military service as necessary. The Senate proposes a one-year transition to consider Title 10 revisions out of concerns about excessive costs and growth in the military bureaucracy. The House version does not require a transition period.

• During his confirmation hearing in July, Esper told the Senate Armed Services Committee that this is the right time to create a separate Space Force service. Referencing the creation of a separate Air Force in 1947, Esper said, “[We’ve] got to realize that it is a new domain of warfare and it requires a different organizational construct and a different way of thinking about it.” “I urge the committee to provide the necessary technical legislative authority to establish the Space Force as the sixth branch of the Armed Forces within the Department of the Air Force. I also request the committee to provide the department with the necessary resources to ensure its success.”

[Editor’s Note]    This is a stand-off between the Trump-backed independent Space Force, and the Deep State-backed US Space Command. The Deep State players in the government want this whole space service under the control of Air Force generals whom the Deep State can still manipulate, in spite of the Air Force’s recent shift away from the Deep State. Trump and the Alliance want the space service separate from the Air Force and the US Space Command, so that he can staff the military branch with non-Deep State officials.

 

WASHINGTON — Defense Secretary Mark Esper on Wednesday gave the United States Space Command a forceful endorsement and described the standup of the new command as the “next crucial step” in the Pentagon’s reorganization of space forces.

Esper spoke on Wednesday in his first news conference as defense secretary alongside Chairman of the Joint Chief of Staff Gen. Joseph Dunford. Esper insisted that he does not intend to depart from the broad goals of the 2018 National Defense Strategy, which calls for DoD to work closely with allies and to modernize the U.S. military to outpace China and Russia.

On Thursday at the White House, President Trump and Vice President Pence will host an establishment ceremony with Esper and the commander of U.S. Space Command Gen. John Raymond.

“I’m excited for tomorrow’s activation of the United States Space Command to ensure the protection of America’s interests in space,” Esper said. “We must apply the necessary focus, energy and resources to the task. That is exactly what the command will do.”

Esper also voiced support for the establishment of an independent Space Force as a branch of the armed forces. But DoD cannot move forward until Congress authorizes it.

“As a unified command, the United States Space Command is the next crucial step toward the creation of an independent Space Force as an additional armed service — an independent additional armed service,” said Esper.

Congress is on recess until Sept. 9. But DoD officials have met with congressional committee staffs over the August recess to discuss Space Force legislation, sources told SpaceNews. The Pentagon specifically is pushing back on the Senate version of the National Defense Authorization Act, which re-designates the Air Force Space Command as the U.S. Space Force but does not rewrite Title 10 of the U.S. Code to establish a new military service. The Senate proposes a one-year transition after which it would consider Title 10 revisions. The House version of the NDAA does not require that transition period.

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