Author: ExoNews Editor

Duke Brickhouse is a former trial lawyer and entertainment attorney who has refocused his life’s work to exposing the truth of our subjugated planet and to help raise humanity’s collective consciousness at this crucial moment in our planet’s history, in order to break out of the dark and negative false reality that is preventing the natural development of our species, to put our planet on a path of love, light and harmony in preparation for our species’ ascension to a fourth density, and to ultimately take our rightful place in the galactic community.

Speaker Says Crash Site Material Unknown Alloy

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by Lisa Dunlap                      July 5, 2019                     (rdrnews.com)

• On July 5th, Frank Kimbler, an associate professor of geology with the New Mexico Military Institute, gave a talk entitled: “UFOs: The Global Quest for Physical Evidence,” at the Roswell UFO Festival. Kimbler has spent nine years researching the Roswell and the nearby Corona UFO crash sites using metal detectors.

• Among military relics scattered about, Kimbler found an alloy at the Roswell site and had it tested by Atlas Testing Laboratories Inc in California, which tested the alloy at the behest of a TV production studio. The test indicated an alloy known to be commonly used in aerospace skins. But the small amount of iron, among other factors, made the material unlike anything ever produced on Earth. Said Kimbler, “[I]t is something that is not on any registry or anything anywhere.” “What we end up with is a brand-spanking new aerospace alloy that nobody has manufactured, at least that I’m aware of. Could it be of ET origin? Maybe,” he said. Kimbler stresses that he isn’t interested in commercializing his work, only searching for answers.

• In his presentation, Kimbler also looked at the physical evidence from three other suspected UFO sightings. In 1957, a young couple were walking along the beach in Ubatuba, Brazil, when they saw a UFO that appeared in distress. After it was assisted by another craft, materials from the distressed craft fell onto the beach. Those samples have isotopes that are outside the range of known Earth-originated materials, according to Kimbler.

• In 1986, a UFO crashed on a mountain peak near the Russian mining town of Dalnegorsk, and was witnessed by over 100 people. Exotic material was recovered. But Kimbler is a bit dubious, since the mining town would be capable of smelting unusual metals.

• In 1976, two university students in Bogota, Columbia saw a UFO in distress, and after being aided by another craft, ejected molten materials. Tests on the materials found a composition of primarily aluminum with some phosphorus, iron and sulphur, Kimbler said.

• These cases are unique as the physical evidence has a clear “chain of provenance” from the eyewitnesses to the testing labs. However, Kimbler noted that in some cases the materials were ‘misplaced’ after testing.

 

An aerospace alloy not known to have been produced on Earth was found at the site of the famous 1947 “Roswell Incident,” according to a local geologist.

Frank Kimbler, an associate professor of geology with the New Mexico Military Institute, has spent nine years conducting research about the alleged UFO crash site on ranch land near Corona and using metal detectors to search the site. He said he has recovered World War II-era artifacts and some still-not-fully-understood materials, including the alloy tested by a California aerospace lab.

                       Frank Kimbler

Kimbler gave a talk, “UFOs: The Global Quest for Physical Evidence,” Friday at the International UFO Museum and Research Center as one of the speakers at the 2019 UFO Festival.

“It is not on the books,” said Kimbler about one sample from the crash site that has been tested. “It is not something that we can’t make, because we probably could make it, but it is something that is not on any registry or anything anywhere.”

Kimbler said he reached his conclusion after he reviewed the results of tests on samples done by Atlas Testing Laboratories Inc., which did the work at the behest of a TV production studio.

The TV group didn’t think the results showed anything interesting. But Kimbler said that, in fact, the data that is intriguing is not from the sample the TV production group was most concerned about, but another sample he provided, labeled as NI-0420, but that he also refers to as NP-0420.

                     exotic metal alloy

Kimbler said he has become an expert on aluminum alloys during the past nine years and he knows that the combination of elements found in the NI-0420 sample indicates the material is very similar to 6951 alloys, known to be used in aerospace skins. But the small amount of iron found, among other factors, makes the material unlike anything ever recorded as produced on Earth.

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The Pitfalls of Searching for Alien Life

by Diane Peters                     July 3, 2019                        (thewire.in)

• In October 2017, a telescope at the University of Hawaii picked up a cigar-shaped object which had sling-shotted past the sun at 196,000 miles per hour. Scientists at the university dubbed it ‘Oumuamua’, Hawaiian for scout (depicted above). At first it was labeled an asteroid, and then a comet, but it certainly came from another solar system.

• Avi Loeb, the chair of Harvard University’s astronomy department, and Shmuel Bialy, a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard, published a paper in The Astrophysical Journal Letters theorizing that the object could be “light sail”, floating in interstellar space as debris from advanced technological equipment. “Alternatively,” they wrote, “a more exotic scenario is that Oumuamua may be a fully operational probe sent intentionally to Earth vicinity by an alien civilization.”

• While scientists theorizing about alien life may find a rapt public audience, they can also draw cynical, even hostile reactions from their fellow scientists. Paul Sutter, an astrophysicist at Ohio State University, tweeted: “No, ‘Oumuamua is not an alien spaceship, and the authors of the paper insult honest scientific inquiry to even suggest it.” Or they may draw sarcasm, as Neil deGrasse Tyson once quipped to CNN: “Call me when you have a dinner invite from an alien.”

• The threat of being written off as a kook looms large for researchers. Many academics “won’t touch it with a ten-foot pole,” said Don Donderi, a retired associate professor of psychology at McGill University in Montreal who now teaches a non-credit course called “UFOs: History and Reality” in the school’s continuing education department. No one at McGill seemed to mind when Donderi began writing about the paranormal in the 1970’s. But when he applied for a grant to investigate UFO sightings he was rejected. At his retirement, Donderi offered to give a free seminar on his UFO and alien abduction research, and was again turned down.

• Donderi notes that people who speak at UFO conferences “aren’t all equally good enough.” Meanwhile, those engaged in the search through bona fide organizations have come up with minimal results. Astronomers have been trying to communicate with alien life using radio waves since 1959, work that has continued by the SETI Institute to the present, but have found nothing. As a psychologist, Donderi believes that cognitive dissonance keeps the search for ET intelligence in limbo. “[A]cademics will bristle at conclusions that point to aliens,” says Donderi.

• Physicist Richard Bower of Durham University in England studies parallel universes. “We used to say that life is incredibly rare and we’re lucky to live on a habitable planet,’’ Bower said. “But we’ve now observed so many planets that are plausible habitats. It seems, based on scientific evidence, there’s no reason to think that planets like the Earth are rare.” Still, Bower is “less comfortable” with excessive speculation. Simply looking for alien life is too binary: if you don’t find it, you’ve got nothing. It is better to focus on questions that we may soon have the evidence to answer.

• We may be finding nothing because we’re doing it wrong. NASA physicist Silvano Colombano maintains that long-held assumptions have limited the earnest search for extraterrestrial intelligence, and that the “general avoidance of the subject by the scientific community” means no one questions them. Colombano suggests the search for alien intelligence is based on “cherished assumptions” that are holding it back, e.g.: that interstellar travel is unlikely, that alien civilizations use radio waves, that other life must be carbon-based, and that UFOs have never visited earth. Colombano makes a case for discarding these dusty beliefs, and instead imagine how alien societies’ technology might have evolved.

• Donderi concludes that the evidence is rising and feels that cognitive dissonance is at the moment collapsing. “[W]e’re at the beginning of the change,” he stated. Researchers expect more data about interstellar objects when the Large Synoptic Telescope in Chile starts operating in 2022.

 

In October 2017, a telescope operated by the University of Hawaii picked up a strange cigar-shaped object (artist rendering in top image), which had slingshotted past the sun at a more-than-brisk top speed of 196,000 miles per hour. Scientists at the university dubbed it ‘Oumuamua, Hawaiian for scout, and at first labelled it an asteroid, then a comet, but agreed that it came from another solar system.

Avi Loeb

Around the world, telescopes were quickly aimed toward ‘Oumuamua’s path, and scientists dove into the data. One of them, Avi Loeb, the chair of Harvard University’s astronomy department, published a paper in The Astrophysical Journal Letters the following year theorising that the object could be artificial. “Considering an artificial origin, one possibility is that ‘Oumuamua is a light sail, floating in interstellar space as a debris from advanced technological equipment,” he and co-author Shmuel Bialy, a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard, wrote. “Alternatively, a more exotic scenario is that ‘Oumuamua may be a fully operational probe sent intentionally to Earth vicinity by an alien civilisation.”

   Don Donderi

That’s not something you read every day in a serious scientific journal. The paper went viral, and Loeb began fielding an onslaught of media calls while fellow scientists weighed in. In terms of his colleagues’ reaction, Loeb said, “almost all of them reacted favourably, and they thought, you know, it’s just an interesting idea.”

Even so, he added, there were some adverse reactions as well. One cutting tweet by Paul Sutter, an astrophysicist at Ohio State University, reads: My publicist asked me for a quote on the ‘Oumuamua story making the rounds. Here it is:
“No, ‘Oumuamua is not an alien spaceship, and the authors of the paper insult honest scientific inquiry to even suggest it.”

Richard Bower

Feel free to use that, @fcain, @tariqjmalik!  — Paul M. Sutter (@PaulMattSutter) November 6, 2018
Also read: India Planning to Launch Own Space Station by 2030, ISRO Chief Says

All this hubbub took place in the aftermath of news reports that the Pentagon had been collecting data on UFO sightings for years. Clearly, the hunt for alien intelligence is alive and well in our solar system, and it’s hot news. Indeed, Loeb’s article was approved for publication in mere days.

                Silvano Colombano

But while scientists tossing around the idea of alien life may find a rapt public audience, they can also draw cynical, even hostile reactions from their fellow scientists, a response summed up by acclaimed physicist Neil deGrasse Tyson, who once quipped to CNN: “Call me when you have a dinner invite from an alien.”

This paradox has ripple effects. The threat of being written off as a kook can loom large for researchers, especially young ones. A lot of academics “won’t touch it with a ten-foot pole,” said Don Donderi, a retired associate professor of psychology at McGill University in Montreal who now teaches a non-credit course called “UFOs: History and Reality” in the school’s continuing education department.

Loeb says many discoveries have their roots in theories that were initially dismissed. He thinks open-mindedness keeps scientific inquiry moving forward while shutting down new theories “reduces the efficiency of science.”

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Shaheen Says She Was Given Classified UFO Briefing

by Daymond Steer                   July 2, 2019                   (conwaydailysun.com)

• On July 2nd, US Senator Jeanne Shaheen (D-NH, pictured above) was in North Conway, New Hampshire where she confirmed receiving a briefing as a member of the Senate Armed Services Committee on reports by Navy fliers of UFOs in the skies over both the East and West Coasts. Said Shaheen, “It was a classified briefing so I’m not allowed to talk about it. But if you were to ask me personally do I believe there are UFOs, I think that there are events that have happened that have not been explained adequately.”

• UFOs have been in the news quite a lot in recent years. The New York Times has reported a secret Pentagon UFO program from 2007-12 (and beyond), and released Navy cockpit video footage of a “tic tac” UFO flying over the Pacific Ocean in 2004. That Navy pilot was Windham, New Hampshire’s own David Fravor who has also told his story on the History Channel’s television show “Unidentified.” Last October, The Guardian reported that the Senate Armed Services Committee was briefed on the 2004 incident described by Fravor.

• Earlier this year, Navy pilots on the East Coast also were also interviewed by the Times about encounters with UFOs. The Navy has recently relaxed its UFO reporting policies. ABC News’ George Stephanopoulos asked President Donald Trump about UFOs. Trump confirmed that he was briefed on UFOs and didn’t “particularly” believe in them.

• Shaheen happened to be in Conway on “World UFO Day”, commemorating the July 2, 1947 crash of a UFO in Roswell, NM. The goal for the day was to raise awareness of UFOs and to promote what enthusiasts call “disclosure” of the same.

 

U.S. Sen. Jeanne Shaheen she confirmed during her trip to North Conway Tuesday, which was “World UFO Day,” that she’s been briefed on unidentified flying objects.

July 2 was chosen as World UFO day because it “commemorates the supposed UFO crash in 1947,” said Wikipedia, making reference to an alleged incident in Roswell, N.M.

The goal for the day was to raise awareness of UFOs and also to promote what enthusiasts call “disclosure” of the same.
Shaheen is on the Armed Services Committee of the U.S. Senate. She was not aware of World UFO Day. However, she confirmed a briefing on them.

“We have been briefed,” said Shaheen. “It was a classified briefing so I’m not allowed to talk about it. But if you were to ask me personally do I believe there are UFOs, I think that there are events that have happened that have not been explained adequately.”

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