Author: ExoNews Editor

Duke Brickhouse is a former trial lawyer and entertainment attorney who has refocused his life’s work to exposing the truth of our subjugated planet and to help raise humanity’s collective consciousness at this crucial moment in our planet’s history, in order to break out of the dark and negative false reality that is preventing the natural development of our species, to put our planet on a path of love, light and harmony in preparation for our species’ ascension to a fourth density, and to ultimately take our rightful place in the galactic community.

How the CIA Tried to Quell a UFO Panic During the Cold War

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Article by Becky Little                     January 5, 2020                      (history.com)

• In the 1950s, when Cold War anxiety in America ranged from Soviet psychological warfare to nuclear annihilation, LIFE Magazine published a story titled “Have We Visitors From Space?” that offered “scientific evidence that there is a real case for interplanetary saucers.” A few months later in the summer of 1952, newspaper headlines blared reports of flying saucers swarming Washington, D.C. During this period, the US Air Force said that reported UFO sightings jumped from 23 to 148.

• the U.S. government worried about the prospect of a growing national hysteria. The CIA decided it needed a “national policy” for “what should be told the public regarding the phenomenon, in order to minimize risk of panic.” The CIA convened a group of scientists to investigate whether the UFO phenomena represented a national security threat.

• The CIA’s Office of Scientific Intelligence collaborated with Howard Percy Robertson, a professor of mathematical physics at the California Institute of Technology, to gather a panel of nonmilitary scientists. The Robertson panel met for a few days in January 1953 to review Air Force records about UFO sightings going back to 1947. The panel reviewed Project Blue Book investigators Captain Edward J. Ruppelt and J. Allen Hynek and concluded that many of these ‘unexplained’ sightings were actually explainable if you just got creative about it. The panel’s main concern was controlling public hysteria.

• According to former UK government UFO investigator, Nick Pope, the CIA was worried that “the Soviets would find a way to use the huge level of public interest in UFOs to somehow manipulate, to cause panic; which then could be used to undermine national cohesiveness.” The Robertson report itself supports this viewpoint, suggesting “mass hysteria” over UFOs could lead to “greater vulnerability to possible enemy psychological warfare.”

• The Robertson report, which was released to the public in 1975 (see the Robertson report here), recommended debunking the notion of UFOs in the media content of articles, TV shows and movies in order to “… reduce the current gullibility of the public and … their susceptibility to clever hostile propaganda.”

• News reporter and book author, Leslie Kean, points to a CBS television show hosted by Walter Cronkite in 1966, which a Robertson panelist claimed to have helped organize “around the Robertson panel conclusions”. The program focused on debunking UFO sightings.

• Between 1966 and 1968, the US Air Force commissioned another ‘scientific’ inquiry into Project Blue Book by physicist Edward U. Condon and a group of scientists at the University of Colorado. The Condon Committee concluded that UFOs posed no threat to the U.S., and that most sightings could be easily explained. It also suggested that the Air Force end Project Blue Book’s investigations into UFOs—which it did in 1969. (see Condon Report here)

• UFO researchers have suggested that the government never really allowed the Robertson panel, the Condon Committee, or even Project Blue Book to review the most sensitive ‘classified’ UFO sightings. This is directly supported by a 1969 memo signed by Brigadier General Carroll H. Bolender revealing the Air Force hadn’t shared all UFO sightings with Project Blue Book and would continue to investigate sightings that could present a national security threat after the project ended.

• Critics claim that the real goal of the Robertson panel, the Condon Committee, and Project Blue Book was never to identify UFOs, but simply to influence public reaction to them. If so, then the government must have had information about extraterrestrials it wanted to conceal.

• The secrecy involving national security issues gave the CIA and the Air Force the audacity to explain away UFO sightings as “natural phenomena such as ice crystals and temperature inversions.” An example of a cover-up of UFOs that continues to today is the CIA’s claim that over half of the UFOs reported in the 1950s and 60s were actually US spy planes. CIA National Reconnaissance Office historian Gerald K. Haines notes a CIA tweet in 2014 that read, “Remember reports of unusual activity in the skies in the ‘50s? That was us.”

 

     Howard Percy Robertson

In January 1953, the fledgling Central Intelligence Agency had a thorny situation on its hands. Reports of UFO sightings were mushrooming around the country. Press accounts were fanning public fascination—and concern. So the CIA convened a group of scientists to investigate whether these unknown phenomena in the sky represented a national security threat.

                  The Robertson Panel

But there was something else.

At a time when growing Cold War anxiety about the Soviets ranged from psychological warfare to wholesale nuclear annihilation, the U.S. government worried about the prospect of a growing national hysteria. In the previous year, UFOs had begun to figure prominently in the public conversation. In April 1952, the popular magazine LIFE published a story titled “Have We Visitors from Space?” that promised to offer “scientific evidence that there is a real case for interplanetary saucers.” In July that year, newspaper headlines around the country blared reports of flying saucers swarming Washington, D.C. Between March and June that year, the number of UFO sightings officially reported to the U.S. Air Force jumped from 23 to 148. Given all the attention UFOs were getting, the CIA decided it needed a “national policy” for “what should be told the public regarding the phenomenon, in order to minimize risk of panic,” according to government documents.

The Robertson report: The real enemy is hysteria

          Edward U. Condon

To this end, the CIA’s Office of Scientific Intelligence collaborated with Howard Percy Robertson, a professor of mathematical physics at the California Institute of Technology, to gather a panel of nonmilitary scientists. The Robertson panel met for a few days in January 1953 to review Air Force records about UFO sightings going back to 1947.

Project Blue Book, which had started in 1952, was the latest iteration of the Air Force’s UFO investigative teams. After interviewing project members Captain Edward J. Ruppelt and astronomer J. Allen Hynek, the panel concluded that many sightings Blue Book had tracked were, in fact, explainable. For example, after reviewing film taken of a UFO sighting near Great Falls, Montana on August 15, 1950, the panel concluded what the film actually showed was sunlight reflecting off the surface of two Air Force interceptor jets.

The panel did actually see a potential threat related to this phenomena—but it wasn’t saucers and little green men.

“It was the public itself,” says John Greenewald, Jr., founder of The Black Vault, an online archive of government documents. There was a concern “that the general public, with their panic and hysteria, could overwhelm the resources of the U.S. government” in a time of crisis.

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Mars Helicopter is Ready for Extraterrestrial Flight

 

Article by NASA                          January 4, 2020                          (lakeconews.com)

• When NASA’s next Mars rover sets out for the Red Planet in 2020, it will bring along a Mars Helicopter. It is touted as another “first” for Mars. NASA wants to expand its exploration capabilities to include an aerial dimension, new areas for exploration, faster reconnaissance, and access to terrain not reachable by rovers or astronauts.

• The Mars Helicopter’s unique design is driven by the harsh realities of Mars’ environment. The Martian atmosphere is extremely thin and cold, with only 1 to 2 percent the density of sea-level air. With temperatures down to -130˚ F it resembles Earth’s atmosphere at 100,000 feet – an altitude far beyond the capabilities of regular helicopters.

• Researchers at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, NASA Ames Research Center, NASA Langley Research Center and AeroVironment Inc., worked together over several years to develop a viable vehicle design that is part aircraft and part spacecraft. A crucial aspect of the design is to keep the mass as low as possible, but to carry enough power and energy to sustain the helicopter during flight. With two four-foot rotors that spin in opposite directions at approximately 2500 revolutions per minute, the Mars Helicopter weighs only four lbs.

• The Mars Helicopter is designed to operate at a height of 16 feet for only about 90 seconds at a time. Between flights, the helicopter recharges its batteries with an onboard solar panel. The helicopter navigates utilizing a vision-based navigation system, unassisted by humans, GPS or other navigation aids. A 12-megapixel camera takes pictures during flight, which are beamed back to the rover for relay to Earth. During the cold Martian nights, the batteries and sensitive electronics are kept warm inside a heated and insulated fuselage.

• The research team replicated the conditions of the Martian atmosphere in a 25-foot vacuum chamber ‘Space Simulator’ complete with emulated Martian winds. The team performed extensive modeling and simulation, as well as low-density experiments to determine how the helicopter would respond to the thin atmosphere, wind gusts, temperature and radiation. Controlled flight of a test vehicle was achieved in May 2016. The actual Mars Helicopter Flight Model which will be sent to Mars performed its maiden hover flight in early 2019. It will now be integrated with the rover with its next flight over the Red Planet.

[Editor’s Note]  Once again, NASA is depicting the Martian atmosphere as extremely thin, cold and inhospitable. But we know from Mars insiders such as Andrew Basiago, Randy Cramer, Tony Rodrigues, and Corey Goode that the Martian air is breathable. The air isn’t as thin as NASA claims.  The planet is cold primarily at the poles, and electric storms pervade the equatorial region. 

NASA wants to appear as if it is exploring the surface of Mars without really exploring it, because they don’t want to reveal the extensive presence already on the planet by secret space programs and indigenous beings, mostly underground. But not to worry. This Mars Helicopter only travels in 90-second spurts, 16 feet off of the ground before needing to recharge. How much ‘exploring’ can it accomplish?

 

The Mars Helicopter is a technology demonstration for the Mars 2020 rover mission, intended to show the feasibility and utility of using helicopters for Mars exploration.

This technology may enable future missions to perform reconnaissance or independent science, and to access terrain not reachable by rovers and astronauts.

When NASA’s next Mars rover sets out for the Red Planet in 2020, it will bring along a passenger. Nestled under the belly of the rover, the Mars Helicopter will be on a mission to notch a “first” for humankind: flying a helicopter on another planet.

By sending the helicopter to Mars as a technology demonstration, NASA aims to expand its exploration capabilities to include an aerial dimension, potentially opening new areas to exploration, and enabling faster reconnaissance for the benefit of future rovers or astronauts.

With a four-foot rotor and a weight of only four lbs, the Mars Helicopter’s unique design is driven by the harsh realities of the Mars environment.

The Martian atmosphere is extremely thin and cold; at only 1 to 2 percent, the density of sea-level air and with temperatures down to -130˚ F, it resembles Earth’s atmosphere at 100,000 feet – an altitude far beyond the capabilities of regular helicopters.

To make the Mars Helicopter a reality, researchers from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, NASA Ames Research Center, NASA Langley Research Center and AeroVironment Inc., worked together over several years to understand the unique challenges of flying on Mars, and to develop a viable vehicle design that is part aircraft and part spacecraft.

A crucial aspect of the design is to keep the mass as low as possible, but to carry enough power and energy to sustain the helicopter during flight. Recent technological advances in areas such as batteries and solar cells, miniaturized sensors and computers, and lightweight materials are key to achieving this goal.

Many components of the Mars Helicopter were developed for the commercial cell phone and drone markets. They were qualified for the Mars Helicopter mission through testing in Mars-like temperatures and by subjecting them to radiation levels that would be experienced in space.

The Mars Helicopter is designed to operate independently on Mars, performing flights of about 90 s in duration at a height of 16 feet. The two rotors spin in opposite directions at approximately 2500 revolutions per minute.

 

1:22 minute Mars Helicopter demonstration (‘NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory’ YouTube)

 

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Why We’re Sending Music to Extraterrestrials

 

Article by Daniel Oberhaus                          January 2, 2020                            (slate.com)

• Any musician will tell you, there is a deep logic inherent to music: There are equal distances between notes in a scale, notes can be combined in certain ways called harmonics, rhythm can be expressed in numerical ratios called time signatures, and so on. Music is a hybrid of logic and emotion, the yin and yang of the human experience.

• In this respect, music is an ideal medium for interstellar communication, but it must be tailored for transmission across billions of miles of empty space. The music must first be encoded into the radio wave in either an analog or digital format. Music’s inherent formalism suggests that even an ET that lacks the ability to hear could gainfully analyze various elements of music—its rhythm, pitch, and so on—by studying the way these elements are encoded in radio waves.

• The founder of the METI Institute (Messaging Extraterrestrial Intelligences) Douglas Vakoch, music composer Andrew Kaiser, and Dutch computer scientist Alexander Ollongren have all proposed unique ways for encoding musical concepts in interstellar messages. Vakoch believes that musical messages can teach ET quite a bit about human physiology. The number of notes in a scale can be used to establish how sensitive we are to differences between notes. Musical and rhythmic concepts can be readily taught to extraterrestrials.

• If the goal of METI is to convey information about Earth and the people who inhabit it, neglecting to include music would be a major oversight. Music has long played a fundamental role in the human experience. So how do we select which songs to send to ET? We’ve already sent into space Mexican folk music, early rock and roll, a Peruvian wedding song, Gershwin, and of course Beethoven and Vivaldi. Many Beatles songs have found their way to space. Until now, a small committee of Caucasian scientists have leaned toward classical music. It is simply impossible to create a corpus of music that represents every cultural group on Earth or every genre of music.

• The most promising path forward is designing music specifically for interstellar transmission. It would effectively be to create an entirely new genre of music. Not only would it avoid selection bias, but it opens the possibility of creating music that carries a maximum amount of information about the species that created it.

• Sónar is an annual three-day festival in Barcelona, Spain dedicated to electronic music, art, and design. To celebrate Sónar’s 25th anniversary in 2018, the festival partnered with the Catalonia Institute for Space Studies and the nonprofit METI International to send a series of interstellar messages directly to Luyten’s star, a red dwarf about 12 light-years from Earth. The closest potentially habitable exoplanet orbits this red dwarf.

• In late 2017 and early 2018, over the course of several nights, a radar system in Tromsø, Norway, blasted a custom message from the Sónar festival toward Luyten’s exoplanet, GJ237b. It consisted of 33 prime numbers repeated on two alternating radio frequencies. This was followed by a brief tutorial intended to teach ET to extract the music written by Sónar-affiliated musicians and embedded in the message.

• The Sónar music might only be called music in the loosest sense of the word. They are basically seconds-long noises based on a computer algorithm or random frequencies. The thinking is that even random screeches reveal our basic technology and physiology – topics that would presumably be of interest to an extraterrestrial recipient.

• An artificial language for interstellar communication called the ‘lingua cosmica’ based on logic, mathematics, and natural language syntax was actually developed in the 1960s. Dutch computer scientist Ollongren proposes to upgrade the lingua cosmica based on lambda calculus.

• When Carl Sagan set about designing the Voyager Golden Record, he recognized that “launching this bottle into the cosmic ocean says something very hopeful about life on this planet.” The same holds true for musical interstellar messages, even if our terrestrial melodies never grace an extraterrestrial ear.

 

Each summer for the past 25 years, tens of thousands of people have flocked to Barcelona, Spain, to witness Sónar, a three-day festival dedicated to

         Douglas Vakoch

electronic music, art, and design. Something of a cross between a TED talk, Burning Man, and Coachella, Sónar has evolved from a small experiment into an event that the New York Times described as a “European institution” in 2017. It’s also the closest thing we have to an extraterrestrial envoy.

To celebrate Sónar’s 25th anniversary in 2018, the festival partnered with the Catalonia Institute for Space Studies and

             Andrew Kaiser

the nonprofit METI International to send a series of interstellar messages to Luyten’s star, a red dwarf about 12 light-years from Earth. Although red dwarfs are the most common stellar objects in our galaxy, Luyten’s star is remarkable for hosting GJ237b, the closest potentially habitable planet outside of our own solar system. No one knows for sure whether GJ237b hosts life, intelligent or otherwise, but if ET does call the planet home, Sónar wants to rock its socks off.

Over the course of several nights in late 2017 and early 2018, a radar system in Tromsø, Norway, blasted a custom message from Sónar toward GJ237b. Like any good correspondence, the message began with a greeting: In this case, the first 33 prime numbers repeated on two alternating radio frequencies functioned as a stand-in for “hello.” This was followed by a brief tutorial that the message designers hoped would teach ET to extract the music written by Sónar-affiliated musicians and embedded in the message.

Each song in the Sónar messages is only a few seconds long and might only be called music in the loosest sense of the word. One track was created by feeding an algorithm music and letting it remix the notes as it saw fit, which resulted in something that sounds like a horror movie sound effect. Another

    Alexander Ollongren

uses the atomic numbers of a handful of oxygen, silicon, and other elements as the frequencies for pure tones. These arrangements don’t make for easy listening, but that’s not the point. Instead, the artists use music as a way of conveying information, whether it’s about our aesthetic sensibilities, our technology, or our physiology—all topics that would presumably be of interest to an extraterrestrial recipient.

In many respects, the Sónar messages are on well-trodden ground. The first human-made object to make it to interstellar space, the Voyager 1 spacecraft, carries a gold-plated phonographic record that includes Mexican folk music, early rock and roll, a Peruvian wedding song, and more. In 2001, a message sent from the Evpatoria radar in Ukraine included theremin renditions of Beethoven, Vivaldi, and Gershwin; a few years later, NASA blasted a Beatles song at a star 400 light-years away.

 

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