The Pentagon Has No Intention of Sharing UFO Information

Article by Jazz Shaw                                  September 10, 2020                                         (hotair.com)

• All of the UFO/UAP (‘Unidentified Aerial Phenomena’) news this summer created a considerable excitement in the air. Florida Senator Marco Rubio made an unprecedented request for a report from the Pentagon’s UAP Task Force. Most people, civilians and government officials alike, didn’t even know we HAD a UFO task force. Then the Pentagon came out and officially announced the ‘formation’ of the task force. Then the NY Times published an article alluding to additional programs and an acknowledgment of a government “crash retrieval program” that could be in possession of “off-world materials”. Heady stuff.

• Journalist Roger Glassel contacted Pentagon UAP spokesperson Susan Gough with some specific questions about the new task force. Ms. Gough provided answers in a professional fashion, but seemingly doused most hopes for some new era of government transparency on the subject.

• Question: Will the public be informed about any findings from the UAPTF of the nature and/or origins of Unidentified Aerial Phenomena?   Answer: “[T]o avoid disclosing information that may be useful to our adversaries, DOD does not discuss publicly the details of either the observations or the examination of reported incursions into our training ranges or designated airspace, including those incursions initially designated as UAP.” (ie: “No.”)

• Question: Will the newly established UAP Task Force look into other aspects of the nature and origins of Unidentified Aerial Phenomena, or will the UAPTF just look at the aspect of UAP being a potential threat to U.S. national security?   Answer: “The Department of Defense established the [task force] to improve its understanding of, and gain insight into, the nature and origins of UAP incursions into our training ranges and designated airspace. The mission of the task force is to detect, analyze and catalog UAP incursions that could potentially pose a threat to U.S. national security. (ie: Pentagon is sticking to its position that they have no curiosity as to what these things are or where they came from, and are solely focusing on the potential national security threat, severely limiting the scope of what might be examined.)

• To summarize, the Pentagon’s UFO task force will take reports about UAP encounters if they might constitute a threat to national security and they promise to do a better job collecting and correlating such reports. But they won’t be releasing any of it for public consumption. The same goes for the Senate Intelligence Committee and the report the “requested”. That committee request may not even make it to the House bill, much less law. Furthermore, Congress hasn’t tied the request to any funding, so the DoD is under no obligation to comply. They can simply thank Congress for their input and proceed to ignore them, just as Ms Gough evaded the journalist’s questions.

• If there’s going to be any serious UFO disclosure it’s going to be up to the private sector and organizations such as Tom DeLonge’s ‘To The Stars Academy’, or whistleblowers like Luis Elizondo, or some high-ranking deathbed confessions – which the Pentagon can deny or obfuscate.

 

                 Roger Glassel

Some disappointing news on the UFO front came out this week, likely dampening the hopes of many people in the ufology community who have been eagerly looking forward to some sort of forthcoming disclosure from the government on this subject. As regular readers are already aware, there was considerable excitement in the air this summer following a number of revelations and surprising announcements on the topic of Unidentified Aerial Phenomena (UAPs). First we saw a request from the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, led by Marco Rubio, for a public report from the Pentagon’s UAP Task Force. This came as quite a surprise to people, including many in the government, who didn’t even know that we had a UAP Task Force.

           Susan Gough

That was followed by an official announcement of the formation of the task force by the Pentagon. After that, major newspapers such as the New York Times began digging into the subject, even raising the prospect of the potential disclosure of additional programs that might even include an acknowledgment of a government “crash retrieval program” that could be in possession of “off-world materials.

This led journalists in the ufology field to press the Pentagon for additional details. One such person was investigative journalist Roger Glassel, who contacted Pentagon UAP spokesperson Susan Gough with a number of specific questions about the new task force and its anticipated activities as they proceed to compile existing information on UAP encounters by the military and create channels for the collection of future reports. I first saw the article teased on Twitter.

The answers Roger received give us the disappointing news I alluded to above. Ms. Gough (which is pronounced “Goff,” by the way, as I only learned from her this week) provided Glassel with answers in a professional fashion, but seemingly doused most hopes for some new era of government transparency on the subject. Here are two of the key questions that produced bad news.

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Trump’s Promises for Space Force and NASA in His Second Term

Article by Mark Whittington                              August 30, 2020                              (thehill.com)

• Among the promises that President Trump has made as part of his “Contract with America,” (see here) should he be re-elected, will be to “launch Space Force, establish permanent manned presence on the Moon, and send the first manned mission to Mars.”

• A permanent Moon base is not likely to happen in Trump’s second term. Nor will a mission to Mars. As his presidency draws to a close, the best that Trump can hope for during a second term is to preside over the first human Moon landing since 1972. The lunar landing promises to include the first woman to step on the Moon, ever.

• President Trump has executed the most far-reaching space policy since President Kennedy’s race to the Moon. Deep space exploration programs that involve returning astronauts to the Moon and dispatching crewed expeditions to Mars have been a perennial project for Republican presidents. Trump has proposed a deep space exploration program that employs a combination of NASA and the commercial sector. Both Trump’s executive orders and Congressional legislation have encouraged the economic development of space, particularly mining the Moon and the asteroids along with space-based manufacturing.

• Trump’s space agenda is more remarkable because he gave barely a hint of it during his first campaign. Twice, when he was running for president, Trump was dismissive of sending humans to Mars. Now he can talk of little else.

• While the idea of a separate space-faring military branch has been kicked around for years, the Space Force initiative came out of the blue. In a remarkably short time, Trump has turned an obscure policy proposal into reality. While some critics mock the Space Force, others agree that the nation’s dependence on communications satellites and GPS needs a Space Force branch to defend those assets.

• The Democrats have, quite cleverly, endorsed the President’s space agenda in their own party platform (see here), suggesting that it doesn’t matter who is president insofar as space is concerned. But how would a President Biden go to advance deep space exploration, commercial space development and the Space Force? No one can be quite sure about Biden, especially as he is being heavily influenced by space opponents like Bernie Sanders.

• We don’t know whether Joe Biden would work to enhance America’s space power, and one suspects that he won’t, if elected. Trump, on the other hand, will work relentlessly to make America a space superpower.

 

Instead of a party platform, the Republicans have deferred to President Donald Trump, who has offered what is in effect a “Contract with America,” similar to the one Newt Gingrich drew up in advance of the 1994 midterm elections. Among the promises Trump has made is the following:
“Launch Space Force, Establish permanent manned presence on the moon and send the first manned mission to Mars.”

        Democrat nominee Joe Biden

The space promise, succinct and to the point, elicits a couple of quibbles.

First, a permanent moon base is not likely to happen in the second term. Nor will a mission to Mars. As his presidency draws to a close, the best that Trump can hope for is to preside over the first human moon landing since 1972, a remarkable feat regardless.

Also, the use of the adjective “manned” is likely to trigger outrage in certain quarters. America has been launching female astronauts since Sally Ride’s first flight in the early 1980s. Indeed, NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine always takes pains to state that the first human moon landing in over 40 years will consist of “the first woman and the next man.”

One can also point out that, like the space plank in the Democratic Party platform, Trump’s promise lacks certain specifics. However, the president has a record forged during his current term that fills in the blanks in great detail.

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Space Weapons to Counter China and Russia

Article by Dave Makichuk                                August 28, 2020                                 (asiatimes.com)

• The Pentagon and President Trump consider space to be a warfighting domain on par with land, air and sea. And the newly established US Space Command indeed faces a clear and present danger. China has already tested anti-satellite missiles, while Russia has deployed on-orbit systems that could threaten US satellites. America’s adversaries now have the ability to use jammers, ground-based lasers, ground- and space-based kinetic weapons, attack ground facilities that support space operations or even carry out a nuclear detonation in space.

• “As a geographical combatant command focused on the space domain, those are the things that keep us up at night,” says Army National Guard Major General Tim Lawson. But Lawson told the virtual audience at the National Defense Industrial Association’s Space Warfighting Industry Forum (on August 21st) that America has new capabilities are on the way to mitigate the threat. But these capabilities classified as “black budget” projects, and he can’t tell you about them.

• “A lot of times you listen to that threat picture and you kind of get a little dismayed at what you’re seeing, but then you look at our side and — trust me — we’ve got some things coming. So, it’s good news,” said Lawson.

• Lawson highlighted the need to have resilient space architectures that utilize large networks of small communications and intelligence-gathering satellites that would be less vulnerable to enemy attacks. “If you had hundreds of small satellites up there in a constellation … the enemy can take out quite a few of those and it will really never have an impact on us,” he said. “That really is the resiliency piece that we’re seeking out there and we need.” The ‘Spacecom’ command is also interested in developments in space logistics such as on-orbit refueling or servicing of satellites. Lawson says that if American industry could put assets into orbit to overwhelm adversaries’ ability to shoot them down, “it would be a game-changer”.

• But it’s not the first time a US president has launched a major military defense project in space. President Ronald Reagan envisioned a Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) as an array of space-based X-ray lasers would detect and deflect any nukes headed toward the United States. On March 23, 1983, Reagan called upon the US scientists who “gave us nuclear weapons to turn their great talents to the cause of mankind and world peace: to give us the means of rendering these nuclear weapons impotent and obsolete.”

• But politicians and scientists argued that SDI was overambitious. Massachusetts Senator Edward Kennedy referred to it as Reagan’s ”reckless ‘Star Wars’ schemes.” The “Star Wars” moniker stuck. Over the course of 10 years, the government spent up to $30 billion on developing the concept without achieving operational status. It was scrapped by President Bill Clinton in 1993.

[Editor’s Note]   So where did this $30 billion go? By coincidence, the 1980’s was when the US Navy created and deployed its deep space fleet of eight oversized submarine-type warp drive spacecraft known as ‘Solar Warden’, unbeknownst to the public.

 

To say that officials at the newly established US Space Command face a clear and present danger, is an understatement.

                       Tim Lawson

America’s adversaries now have the ability to use jammers, ground-based lasers, ground- and space-based kinetic weapons, attack ground facilities that support space operations or even carry out a nuclear detonation in space.

               Ronald Reagan

China has already tested anti-satellite missiles, while Russia has deployed on-orbit systems that could threaten US satellites.

But according to Army National Guard Major General Tim Lawson, new capabilities are on the way to mitigate the threat — he just can’t tell you about them, because they are classified under the umbrella of “black budget” projects.

“As a geographical combatant command focused on the space domain, those are the things that keep us up at night,” said Lawson, who made the remarks at the National Defense Industrial Association’s Space Warfighting Industry Forum, which was held virtually due to the Covid-19 pandemic.

                Sen. Edward Kennedy

“I would love to sit behind some closed doors and have this discussion on some of the things we really think we need,” Lawson said when asked about the types of capabilities Spacecom is seeking.

“A lot of times you listen to that threat picture and you kind of get a little dismayed at what you’re seeing, but then you look at our side and — trust me — we’ve got some things coming. So, it’s good news.”

Significant portions of the US military’s space programs are classified, making it difficult for outside observers to know what’s coming down the pike.

Meanwhile, Lawson highlighted the need to have resilient space architectures that utilize large networks of small communications and intelligence-gathering satellites that would be less vulnerable to enemy attacks.

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