Tag: Tom Delonge

The Navy Says Those UFO Videos Are Real

Article by Kyle Mizokami                  September 16, 2019                 (popularmechanics.com)

• The US Navy has confirmed that, while they should never been released to the public, the three online videos taken by Navy pilots of UFOs: the “FLIR1” (aka “Tic Tac”), “Gimbal”, and “GoFast”, are indeed genuine.

• (The “FLIR1”/ “Tic Tac” video was taken November 14, 2004 over the Pacific Ocean off of the coast of San Diego. The “GoFast” video was taken January 21, 2015 over the Atlantic Ocean off of Virginia, and the “Gimbal” video was taken January 21, 2015 over the Atlantic Ocean off of Florida.) In the videos, air crews debate what the objects are and where they came from.

• The videos were released by The New York Times and ‘To The Stars Academy of Arts & Sciences’, a UFO research group headed by former Blink-182 member Tom DeLonge.

• In each case, the UFOs (or ‘UAPs’ – ‘unidentified aerial phenomenon’) undertook aerial maneuvers that aren’t possible with current aviation technology. In the 2004 incident, according to The New York Times article, the ‘Tic Tac UFO’ “appeared suddenly at 80,000 feet, and then hurtled toward the sea, eventually stopping at 20,000 feet and hovering. Then they either dropped out of radar range or shot straight back up.”

• The Department of Defense told The Black Vault website that the videos were unclassified but never cleared for public release, and that there had been no review process within the Pentagon for releasing them. The Pentagon now says the aerial objects in the videos are simply unidentified, and for now, unexplained. The Navy is pointedly not saying the objects are flying saucers or otherwise controlled by aliens.

[Editor’s Note]   And the full disclosure of the Deep State government cover-up of a flourishing extraterrestrial presence takes another step forward.

 

The U.S. Navy has confirmed that three online videos purportedly showing UFOs are genuine. The service says the videos, taken by Navy pilots, show “unexplained aerial phenomena,” but also states that the clips should have never been released to the public in the first place.

The three videos in question are titled “FLIR1,” “Gimbal,” and “GoFast.” They show two separate encounters between Navy aircraft and UFOs.

One video was taken in 2015 off the East Coast by a F/A-18F fighter jet using the aircraft’s onboard Raytheon AN/ASQ-228 Advanced Targeting Forward-Looking Infrared (ATFLIR) Pod. The other clip, also recorded with a Super Hornet ATFLIR pod, was taken off the coast of California in 2004 by pilots flying from the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz. In the videos, air crews loudly debate what the objects are and where they came from.

The videos were released for public viewing by The New York Times and To The Stars Academy of Arts & Sciences, a UFO research group from former Blink-182 member Tom DeLonge.

In each case, the objects in the videos undertook aerial maneuvers that aren’t possible with current aviation technology. In the 2004 incident, according to The New York Times, the objects “appeared suddenly at 80,000 feet, and then hurtled toward the sea, eventually stopping at 20,000 feet and hovering. Then they either dropped out of radar range or shot straight back up.”

2:46 minute FLIR1 ‘Tic Tac’ Video (To The Stars Academy YouTube)

1:53 minute Gimbal Video (To The Stars Academy YouTube)

2:04 minute Go Fast Video (To The Stars Academy YouTube)

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Tom DeLonge’s UFO Research Center is Making Politicians Demand Answers

Listen to “E72 8-20-19 Tom DeLonge’s UFO Research Center is Making Politicians Demand Answers” on Spreaker.
Article by MJ Banias                         August 9, 2019                          (vice.com)

• In July, Republican US Representative Mark Walker of North Carolina, wrote a letter to the Secretary of the Navy expressing concern over the recent surge in UFO-related events affecting American military forces. Walker noted a December 2017 article in the New York Times about the secret Pentagon UFO program called AATIP and revelations that Navy pilots encountered anomalous aerial objects off of the coast of California in 2004 and off of the East Coast in 2015, and whether it could pose a security risk.

• Tim McMillan, a law enforcement consultant and intelligence analyst interested in UFOs said, “It’s abundantly clear by the language of his letter, Rep. Walker is acting on information brought out by To The Stars Academy or their proxies.” TTSA is Tom DeLonge’s UFO study organization that has been promoting the government’s knowledge of the existence of UFOs. “What we see here,” says McMillan, is the “most successful component of TTSA—[as] a political lobby.”

• Walker concludes his letter to the Navy Secretary by asking: does the DoD “continue to dedicate resources to tracking and investigating these claims” of UFOs and have they found any “physical evidence or otherwise that substantiates these claims?” McMillan says, “The Navy’s response to Rep. Walker will be the most interesting aspect of all this.” “Will Representative Walker make the Navy’s response public? [W]ill Representative Walker push the issue further?”

• The study of UFOs is becoming serious political business and has convinced many within the UFO community that this is a pivotal moment in the study of the phenomenon. But Walker’s letter is just another example in a long history of politicians trying to get answers. Politicians and high-ranking officials have been questioning the UFO cover-up for decades.

• Republican Presidential candidate in 1964, Barry Goldwater was denied access to Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in the late 1960’s and 70’s where he alleged that the Air Force was hiding evidence of flying saucers. In a 1994 interview, he stated, “I think the government does know [about UFOs].” Goldwater related that he called his former running mate, Air Force General Curtis LeMay, and said, “’General, I know we have a room at Wright-Patterson where you put all this secret [UFO] stuff. Could I go in there?’ … [H]e got madder than hell at me, cussed me out, and said, ‘Don’t ever ask me that question again!’”

• In 1967 in open dialogue on the floor of the Canadian House of Commons Ministers of Parliament, Ed Schreyer and Barry Mather demanded more information on UFOs from the Department of National Defence. This led to a formal motion to have all related UFO documents released. The motion was denied.

• In 1993, New Mexico Congressman Steven Schiff made several inquiries to the DoD regarding the Roswell UFO crash of 1947. This prompted a General Accounting Office investigation into the Roswell crash. In July 1995, the GAO determined that what crashed at Roswell was a Project Mogul balloon.

 

Last month, Republican representative Mark Walker of North Carolina wrote a letter expressing concern over the recent surge in UFO-related events affecting American military forces.

Walker’s concerns stem from the December 2017 article in the New York Times about the now defunded secret Pentagon UFO program called AATIP and the revelations that several Navy pilots in 2004 and 2015 engaged in bizarre encounters with anomalous aerial objects off the coast of California and Florida. The news that the Navy is now changing its protocols for personnel to report UFO sightings has spurred a renewed interest in the potential safety and security risks these unknown objects pose.

“The reports mention the existence of these encounters both domestically and abroad during various missions and trainings,” Walker wrote. “Based on pilot accounts, encounters with these UAPs (unidentified aerial phenomena) often involved complex flight patterns and advanced maneuvering, which demand extreme advances in quantum mechanics, nuclear science, electromagnetics, and thermodynamics.”

What’s most notable is that what Walker is asking for closely aligns with what Blink 182 singer Tom Delonge’s To the Stars Academy (TTSA) has been uncovering and publishing over the last few years. While TTSA has made some odd claims, the sheer amount of attention the media is giving the UFO topic in the last two years has undoubtedly increased.

“What we see here with Mark Walker’s letter to the Secretary of the Navy is the undiscussed, but most successful component of TTSA—a political lobby,” Tim McMillan, a law enforcement consultant and intelligence analyst interested in UFOs, said in an interview. “It’s abundantly clear by the language of his letter, Rep. Walker is acting on information brought out by TTSA or their proxies.”

“The Navy’s response to Rep. Walker will be the most interesting aspect of all this,” McMillan added. “Will Rep. Walker make the Navy’s response public? If he feels the Navy’s response is inadequate, will Rep. Walker push the issue further?”

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Tom DeLonge’s UFO Organization Says It’s Obtained ‘Exotic’ Metals Unknown to Science

Listen to “E55 8-6-19 UFO Organization Says It’s Obtained ‘Exotic’ Metals Unknown to Science” on Spreaker.

Article by MJ Banias                     July 26, 2019                   (vice.com)

• In 2017 when the New York Times ran an article about a secret Pentagon UFO program, the article tantalizingly noted that aerospace billionaire Robert Bigelow was housing “metal alloys and other materials…that [allegedly] had been recovered from unidentified aerial phenomena.” These “alien alloys” quickly became the topic of great intrigue.

• Rocker-turned-Ufologist, Tom DeLonge (pictured above), now says that his ‘To the Stars Academy’ has acquired “potentially exotic materials.” It is not clear whether his metamaterials are the same ones as previously referenced in the NY Times article.

• “The structure and composition of these materials are not from any known existing military or commercial application,” said Steve Justice, the COO of the ‘To The Stars Academy’ and former head of Advanced Systems at Lockheed Martin’s Skunk Works. “They’ve been collected from sources with varying levels of chain-of-custody documentation, so we are focusing on verifiable facts and working to develop independent scientific proof of the materials’ properties and attributes. In some cases, the manufacturing technology required to fabricate the material is only now becoming available.” Justice says that the organization wants to reverse engineer the metals with hopes of manufacturing more of them. 

• According to the press release, some of these materials were in the possession of UFO researcher and journalist Linda Moulton Howe, who, in 2004, gave a presentation at the Xcon Conference regarding these materials. In her lecture, she suggests that the material could become a “lifting body” with the right amount of electromagnetic static and certain RF frequency. These are undoubtedly the same materials mentioned by DeLonge on his Joe Rogan interview where he stated, “if you hit it with enough terahertz, it’ll float.”

• In an interview with Motherboard, Dr. Chris Cogswell, who hosts the Mad Scientist Podcast and who holds a PhD in Chemical Engineering, said that layered magnesium and bismuth alloys are pretty common and are certainly easily explainable by science. “Micrometer thick layers are made by mistake in metallurgy facilities all the time.” Cogswell says that if these materials are truly exotic, then initial results should come relatively quickly. “[T]hese tests would take all of a month to run and analyze to see if there is something worth pursuing.”

• Until some rigorous third party scientific testing occurs, or a peer-reviewed paper in an academic journal is published, the best course of action here is to just wait and see.

 

Former Blink 182 frontman and current UFOlogist Tom DeLonge says that his UFO research organization has acquired “potentially exotic materials featuring properties not from any known existing military or commercial application.” It has not yet provided any proof to back up this claim.

For 70 years, the UFO community has been engaged in active debate regarding physical debris from unidentified flying objects, but the general public got a true taste of that in 2017 when the New York Times ran an article about a secret Pentagon UFO program. The article tantalizingly noted that aerospace billionaire Robert Bigelow, whose interest in UFOs is no secret, modified buildings to house “metal alloys and other materials…that [allegedly] had been recovered from unidentified aerial phenomena.”

These “alien alloys” quickly became the topic of great intrigue. DeLonge’s To the Stars Academy, a UFO research outfit that may or may not be broke, said that it has recently acquired some metamaterials, though it’s not clear whether they are the same ones referenced in the NY Times article.

“The structure and composition of these materials are not from any known existing military or commercial application,” Steve Justice, To The Stars Academy’s COO and former head of Advanced Systems at Lockheed Martin’s Skunk Works said in a statement. “They’ve been collected from sources with varying levels of chain-of-custody documentation, so we are focusing on verifiable facts and working to develop independent scientific proof of the materials’ properties and attributes. In some cases, the manufacturing technology required to fabricate the material is only now becoming available.”

Justice said that the organization wants to reverse engineer the metals with hopes of manufacturing more of them.

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