Tag: SETI

More Damage at Arecibo Alien-Hunting Facility

Article by Vistor Tangermann                                    November 9, 2020                                       (futurism.com)

• A second cable has fallen, crushing the intricate reflector dish at the Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico. A first auxiliary cable failed on August 10th, crushing a portion of the dish and resulting in a significant setback for the observatory. The massive dish was mainly used by SETI to hunt for extraterrestrial life. But research had to be put on pause for several months following the August event.

• Now, a main cable connected to the same support tower as the auxiliary cable failed this week, causing additional damage to both the dish and other nearby cables, according to a statement by the University of Central Florida, which co-manages the facility.

• Officials suspect the break may have been caused by the extra load the cables had to carry since the first cable failure. “This is certainly not what we wanted to see, but the important thing is that no one got hurt,” said observatory director Francisco Cordova. “We have been thoughtful in our evaluation and prioritized safety in planning for repairs that were supposed to begin Tuesday. Now this.”

• Engineers are hoping to support the structure with steel reinforcements to alleviate some of the additional load. Two replacement cables are already on their way to the observatory. The aging Arecibo radio telescope dates back to the early 1960s and has been in operation for over half a century. The reflector dish alone is 1,000 feet in diameter and is composed of 38,778 perforated aluminum panels.

 

                   Francisco Cordova

More bad news for the alien-hunting Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico. A second cable has fallen, crushing the intricate reflector dish below.

A first auxiliary cable failed over the massive dish on August 10, crushing a portion of the dish and representing a significant setback for the observatory.

The dish was mainly used to hunt for extraterrestrial life — but research had to be put on pause for several months following the event.

Compounding the problem, a main cable — which was connected to the same support tower as the auxiliary cable — failed this week, causing additional damage to both the dish and other nearby cables, according to a statement by the University of Central Florida, which co-manages the facility.

Luckily, nobody was hurt.

Extra Load

The cause of the break has yet to be identified. Officials suspect it may have been caused by the extra load the cables had to carry since the first cable failure.

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Half of Sun-Like Stars in Galaxy Could Host a Habitable Planet

Article by Mike Williams                                   November 3, 2020                              (unilad.co.uk)

• A new study claims that the Milky Way galaxy could in fact be home to many other inhabitable planets just like ours, within the ‘habitable zone’ of its star – just the right orbital distance where water has the potential to be stable on a planet’s surface. There are around 200 billion G dwarf stars just like our sun, so the chances of some of these solar systems having a planet like Earth is conceivable.

• To illustrate how vast space is, 200 billion stars is only 7% of the Milky Way. Says the study’s co-author, Jeff Coughlin, “This is the first time that all of the pieces have been put together to provide a reliable measurement of the number of potentially habitable planets in the galaxy.” Coughlin is an exoplanet researcher at the SETI (Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) Institute in Mountain View, California. “We’re one step closer on the long road to finding out if we’re alone in the cosmos.”

• Building upon NASA’s Kelper’s science studies conducted between 2009 and 2018, a 2020 team, led by Steve Bryson of NASA’s Ames Research Center in California, has worked hard to discover more than 2,800 exoplanets to date. Bryson and his crew have also examined the European Space Agency’s Gaia spacecraft’s stellar properties which maps out billions of Milky Way stars.

• With all that data, the researchers have been able to predict the occurrence rates of potentially habitable Earth-sized rocky planets along with a sun-like star of similar temperatures. And the chance of there being other life forms on planets like ours is becoming more and more likely.

[Editor’s Note]   What a waste to have these scientists spend their sad careers focused on deep state red herrings, just to give the public the impression that they are diligently looking for intelligent extraterrestrial life but cannot find any, when ETs currently reside throughout our solar system and extraterrestrial civilizations permeate the galaxy and the universe. They just don’t want us to know about it.

 

                        Jeff Coughlin

A new study suggests there are plenty more planets just like ours out there, suggesting we aren’t alone after all.

Having barely touched the tip of space exploration, we are still largely unaware of what is out there – let alone what’s beyond the power of any NASA probe, satellite, or telescope at our disposal.

However, recent research claims the Milky Way could in fact be home to many other inhabitable planets

             Steve Bryson

just like ours, when it comes to exploring the sun-like stars that could have small planets within each’s so-called ‘habitable zone’. The breakthrough claims these zones are just the right orbital distance where water has the potential to be stable on a planet’s surface.

The findings give a glimmer of hope to that age old question of whether it’s just us in the universe; reminding us that there are around 200 billion G dwarfs, aka balls of burning gas just like our sun, so the chances of some of them lighting up planets just like Earth is conceivable, Space.com reports.

But, just to illustrate how vast space is, the figure of 200 billion is only 7% of the Milky Way, as co-author of the study, Jeff Coughlin, shared the significant news, saying, ‘This is the first time that all of the pieces have been put together to provide a reliable measurement of the number of potentially habitable planets in the galaxy.’

Coughlin, an exoplanet researcher at the SETI (Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) Institute in Mountain View, California, also said, ‘This is a key term of the Drake Equation, used to estimate the number of communicable civilizations.’

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SETI Survey of Vela Region Finds No Signs of ET Intelligence

Article by News Staff                                 September 8, 2020                              (sci-news.com)

• Astronomers searching for technosignatures of advanced extraterrestrial civilizations using the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) radio telescope (in Western Australia) published their findings in a paper that appears in the Publications of the Astronomical Society of Australia. “The MWA is a unique telescope, with an extraordinarily wide field-of-view that allows us to observe millions of stars simultaneously,” said Dr. Chenoa Tremblay, an astronomer at the CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science.

• Dr. Tremblay and her colleague, Professor Steven Tingay from the Curtin University node of the International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research (in Perth), searched for narrow-band radio signals consistent with radio transmissions from six known exoplanets and 10,355,066 stellar systems in the Vela region of our Milky Way Galaxy.

• “The telescope was searching for powerful radio emissions at frequencies similar to FM radio frequencies, that could indicate the presence of an intelligent source,” said Dr. Tremblay. “We observed the sky around the constellation of Vela for 17 hours, looking more than 100 times broader and deeper than ever before.”

• “Even though this was the broadest search yet,” said Professor Tingay, “… we found no technosignatures – no sign of intelligent life.” “[E]ven though this was a really big study, the amount of space we looked at was the equivalent of trying to find something in the Earth’s oceans but only searching a volume of water equivalent to a large backyard swimming pool.”

• “Since we can’t really assume how possible alien civilizations might utilize technology, we need to search in many different ways,” said Professor Tingay. “Although there is a long way to go in the search for extraterrestrial intelligence, telescopes such as the MWA will continue to push the limits – we have to keep looking.”

[Editor’s Note]   I’m certain that many of these astronomers working with SETI are unaware that SETI is a Deep State front whose purpose is to make sure that scientists and astronomers do not find any intelligent extraterrestrials. The game is rigged to maintain the Deep State’s seventy-five year psyop, convincing the public that there is no such thing as UFOs and there are no extraterrestrial beings anywhere near here, when the exact opposite is the truth. I wonder how these unwitting scientists and astronomers are going to react to the imminent disclosure of the ubiquitous presence of advanced extraterrestrial beings and civilizations everywhere; that they have been lied to by their superiors; and that they themselves have been promoting Deep State disinformation all of this time.

 

     Dr. Chenoa Tremblay

Astronomers using the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) radio telescope have searched for technosignatures —

       Steven Tingay

indicators of advanced extraterrestrial civilizations — in six known exoplanets and over 10 million stellar systems in the Vela region of our Milky Way Galaxy. But in this part of the Milky Way at least, it appears alien civilizations are elusive, if they exist.

“The MWA is a unique telescope, with an extraordinarily wide field-of-view that allows us to observe millions of stars simultaneously,” said Dr. Chenoa Tremblay, an astronomer at the CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science.

Dr. Tremblay and her colleague, Professor Steven Tingay from the Curtin University node of the International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, searched for narrow-band signals consistent with radio transmissions from six known exoplanets (HD 75289b, HD 73526b, HD 73526c, HD 70642b, DE0823-49b and KELT-15b) and 10,355,066 stellar systems in the Vela region.

“The telescope was searching for powerful radio emissions at frequencies similar to FM radio frequencies, that could indicate the presence of an intelligent source,” she explained.

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