Japan Vows to Work Closely on Lunar Exploration With the US

Article from Kyodo News                            August 26, 2020                              (english.kyodonews.net)

• In August 26th, US and Japanese officials met in Tokyo to further discuss Japan’s role in the NASA-led joint lunar exploration project culminating in a return to the Moon in 2024, actual exploration of the lunar surface beginning in 2028, and ultimately the international ‘Artemis’ lunar habitat project. This will be the first time that humans walk on the Moon since the Apollo 17 mission in 1972.

• The meeting was attended by Scott Pace, executive secretary of the US National Space Council, Gen. John Raymond, chief of Space Force, and Japanese government officials from the Cabinet Office, Defense Ministry and other Japanese agencies.

• Pursuant to a lunar cooperation accord signed in July 2020, the US and NASA acknowledged opportunities for “Japanese crew activities” on the ‘Gateway’, a small spaceship that will orbit the Moon, as well as participate in activities on the lunar surface.

• US officials also acknowledged Japan’s new ‘Space Operation Squadron’, an Air Self-Defense Force space unit monitoring threats to Japanese satellites in outer space. Japanese officials acknowledged the significance of the US Space Command and Space Force.

• Tokyo and Washington also touched on “growing concern for threats to the continuous, safe and stable use of outer space,” a veiled reference to the growing space capabilities of countries such as China and Russia.

 

                       Scott Pace

Japan and the United States on Wednesday pledged to work closely on a lunar exploration project led by

           Gen. John Raymond

the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration after Tokyo joined it last month.

In a joint statement issued after a meeting in Tokyo, the two governments said they “reaffirmed their commitment to Artemis,” the multilateral project intended to return humans to the Moon by 2024 and establish sustainable lunar surface exploration with NASA’s commercial and international partners by 2028.

The two sides “also acknowledged opportunities for Japanese crew activities” on the Gateway, a small spaceship that will orbit the Moon, as well as on the lunar surface, as highlighted in a lunar cooperation accord they signed in July, the statement said.

The last humans to walk on the Moon were American astronauts from the Apollo 17 mission in 1972.

READ ENTIRE ARTICLE

 

FAIR USE NOTICE: This page contains copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. ExoNews.org distributes this material for the purpose of news reporting, educational research, comment and criticism, constituting Fair Use under 17 U.S.C § 107. Please contact the Editor at ExoNews with any copyright issue.

When Frederick Valentich Disappeared Did He See a UFO?

Article by Bee Heim                                August 19, 2020                              (filmdaily.co)

• In 1978, Frederick Valentich was a 20-year old Australian who was training to become a commercial airplane pilot. He had 150 hours of flight time and was allowed to fly at night. But it was not an easy road for Valentich. He consistently failed his commercial license examinations. He also had been involved in a couple of air incidents – straying into controlled airspace above Sydney, and twice deliberately flying into a cloud, which was illegal in his aircraft.

• On the evening of October 21, 1978, Valentich was attempting a training flight over the Bass Strait, between the Australian mainland of Victoria and Tasmania, piloting a Cessna 182L light aircraft. The exact path of the flight was approximately 125 miles from Moorabbin, Victoria to King Island, Tasmania. At 7:06pm Valentich radioed Melbourne Flight Service to let them know that an unidentified aircraft was following him. The Service informed him that radar was showing no traffic near him at the time.

• Valentich insisted that a craft with four bright landing lights was flying 1,000 feet above him. He described the craft as shiny, metallic, and with a green light on it. He kept reporting the craft’s movements for five minutes, saying that he believed that the pilot of the craft was “toying” with him. He described the craft as “orbiting” around his plane. Then Valentich reported engine trouble. Officials asked him to identify the other aircraft. The only thing Valentich could say, and these were his final words before he was cut off by a metallic, scraping sound, was, “It isn’t an aircraft.”

• The authorities assumed that Valentich’s Cessna crashed. An air and sea search was conducted in the area where Valentich last reported his coordinates, but nothing turned up. The matter was turned over to the Australian Department of Transportation, but its investigation came up empty as well. Witnesses reported seeing planes landing or flying overhead, but no one saw a crash. Eventually, Valentich was presumed dead and the case was closed. Five years later, in 1983, an engine cowl flap from the same kind of plane Valentich was flying washed ashore on Flinders Island. Serial numbers on the parts were in the ‘same range’ as Valentich’s Cessna as well.

• Valentich was actually a believer in UFOs and worried about running into one while out flying, according to his father. A Victorian farmer would later claim that he saw a UFO on his property the next day, with Valentich’s plane sticking out of the side of it “leaking” oil. A Victorian UFO group, following up on the lead in 2013, could not identity the farmer,

• Forty years since the incident, the case has never been solved, although it continues to fascinate and haunt people. Was it a real UFO encounter? Or did Valentich make a mistake before crashing? It looks like we may never know.

 

           20 year old Valentich

Is there such a thing as a real UFO? Well, that’s the million-dollar question, isn’t it? There have been plenty of stories of UFO sightings and claims of alien abductions over the years. Very few of those, however, are as spine-chilling as the case of Frederick Valentich, who claims to have seen a UFO before disappearing off the face of the Earth. Y-I-K-E-S, am I right?

Did Frederick Valentich truly see a real UFO before mysteriously disappearing? What happened the night that young pilot disappeared? Will the mystery always remain unsolved? Or is there a chance to know once and for all if aliens truly took Valentich back in the 70s?

Who was Frederick Valentich?

Born in 1958, Valentich was training to become a commercial pilot at the time of his disappearance. He had 150 hours of flight time and was allowed to fly at night. Despite working to become a commercial pilot, Valentich failed all five commercial licence examination subjects. Before he went missing, Valentich failed three more commercial licence subjects.

The 20-year-old Valentich had also been involved in a couple of air incidents. He strayed into controlled airspace above Sydney, which he was let off with a warning. Twice, Valentich flew into a cloud deliberately, which prosecutors were considering pressing charges against Valentich for.

The final flight of Frederick Valentich

On the evening of Oct. 21, 1978, Valentich was attempting a training flight over the Bass Strait, which is between the Australian mainland and Tasmania. To make this flight, Valentich was piloting a Cessna 182L, which is a light aircraft. The exact path of the flight was approx. 125 miles from Moorabbin to King Island.

Any hope of this being a routine training flight, however, went out the window at 7:06pm when Valentich radioed in. He contacted the Melbourne Flight Service and let them know that an unidentified aircraft was following him. The Service, however, said that there was no traffic near him at the time.

READ ENTIRE ARTICLE

 

FAIR USE NOTICE: This page contains copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. ExoNews.org distributes this material for the purpose of news reporting, educational research, comment and criticism, constituting Fair Use under 17 U.S.C § 107. Please contact the Editor at ExoNews with any copyright issue.

The US Deems UFOs a National Security Threat. Why Isn’t Canada Taking it As Seriously?

Article by MJ Banias                               August 14, 2020                                   (theglobandmail.com)

• While the U.S. government is actively investigating UFO reports and Congress is calling for more public oversight on unknown aerial incursions, the Canadian government seems to be doing nothing. After nearly a century of the media portraying the UFO phenomenon as a tinfoil hat-wearing enterprise, filled with extraterrestrials, Martian invasions and far-future technology, it is easy to dismiss UFOs.

• A recently released 2019 Canadian UFO Survey (see here) indicates Canadians see about two or three unidentified flying objects a day. And while many will laugh UFOs off as being a delusion, several sighting events present in the Transport Canada 2019 survey involve pilots coming into close proximity with unknown aerial objects, indicating a clear risk to air safety.

• In April, 2019, a Sunwing airliner on approach into Toronto’s Pearson International Airport was ordered by air traffic control to climb in altitude because an unknown aircraft had entered into its flight path. The Sunwing pilots reported that the “target appeared momentarily to them then disappeared.”

• In June 2019, an airliner on final approach to the St. Hubert airport near Montreal was notified by air traffic control of “unidentified traffic.” The airliner’s collision avoidance system confirmed the object was roughly 3.5 nautical miles ahead of the aircraft and climbing in altitude to 2,700 feet. The pilots made visual contact as the object continued to gain altitude and crossed into controlled airspace.

• In July 2019, air traffic controllers in Langley, British Columbia reported to Transport Canada that “radar targets were coasting in and out to the northwest of the airport” and “random targets popping up, radar tags swapping, targets jumping to random locations.”

• In 2012, a Chinese Eastern Airlines Airbus was flying over Alberta when the pilot spotted an unknown object 40 nautical miles to the south, at 41,000 feet. Most commercial drones cannot even get close to that kind of altitude. Another incident in 2015 occurred over Saskatoon’s international airport where the pilot notified air traffic control that they witnessed a bright white light above their aircraft at roughly 34,000 feet.

• Two flight attendants were injured in 2016 when a Porter flight landing in Toronto nearly collided with an unknown object over Lake Ontario at 9,000 feet. In 2019, several aircraft over the vicinity of Medicine Hat in Alberta reported multiple unidentified objects above their aircraft. In September 2019, an unidentified aircraft buzzed the Kitchener/Waterloo Ontario radar control zone at 2,100 feet.

• While Canadian authorities tend to dismiss the sightings, lately the Americans seem to consider UFOs an important issue that needs more attention. A recent congressional report reveals that the U.S. Office of Naval Intelligence has an active task force that investigates incursions of UFOs into U.S. airspace. Senator Marco Rubio, who chairs the Senate intelligence committee, introduced a congressional bill giving this intelligence-gathering operation 180 days to disclose its findings regarding these UFO incursions.

• Canadian science writer and UFO researcher Chris Rutkowski diligently collects nearly all of Canada’s UFO reports from civilian research organizations and those reported to Transport Canada. Rutkowski says that Canada is experiencing a “possible public safety issue.” “We have no idea if UFO reports are investigated,” says Rutkowski. Transport Canada investigates air incidents, such as near misses or crashes. But when pilots and radar operators see UFOs, such cases are “not investigated.”

• When pilots witness UFOs, they are only “requested’ to make ‘aviation occurrence reports’ to the regional Flight Information Centre in “the interests of national security,” according to regulations published by Nav Canada, a private non-profit organization that handles all Canadian air navigation services. According to Nav Canada’s media relations manager Brian Boudreau, examples include “sightings of aircraft violating operating parameters, unidentified aircraft, unauthorized aircraft, or any activity that may impact flight safety or pose a security threat.” Nav Canada may send a report to the Department of National Defence, the North American Aerospace Defence Command (NORAD), Transport Canada or the American Federal Aviation Administration, at its own discretion.

• A spokesperson from the Canadian Department of National Defence said that all UFOs are reported via Nav Canada’s procedure, including hose made by military personnel. But in a contradictory email, the Dept of National Defence stated: “We wouldn’t really comment on speculative matters such as this. The Canadian Armed Forces concerns itself with credible threats, and this falls outside the scope of our operations.” In response to a Canadian ‘Access to Information Request’ to clear up the matter, the Dept of National Defence responded that it “neither confirms or denies records exist …” and that “if documentation did exist, it is exempted in its entirety” from Access to Information Requests due to national defence.

• Matthew Hayes, a filmmaker and UFO researcher said, “There were many attempts over the years and decades to ignore the UFO phenomenon and requests for information about UFOs, as something outside the scope of the [Canadian government].” While some individuals within the Canadian government take the UFO issue seriously, “most efforts were put toward debunking the subject.” Says Hayes, “[T]hey really wanted the whole thing just to go away.”

• While the various Canadian governmental agencies attempt to make light of UFOs, the data indicates this issue is not going away. Canada saw a reduction in sightings in 2019, but has seen a dramatic increase during the first few months of 2020. When the role of the government and the military is to protect that nation, pretending something does not exist is more politically palatable than admitting there has been an intelligence failure.

• In America however, politicians and intelligence experts have publicly expressed their opinions that perhaps a foreign adversary has developed a superior system of propulsion or technology that can trick sophisticated radar and video recording systems. Or, this phenomenon could be something else entirely. “In the past, the Canadian government has certainly tried to take its lead from the U.S. when it comes to UFO information,” said Hayes. Now that the United States is taking the UFO issue seriously. Canada ought to take it seriously as well.

 

In April, 2019, a Sunwing airliner was on approach into Toronto’s Pearson International Airport when it was ordered by air traffic control operators to climb in altitude because an unknown aircraft had entered into its flight path. The Sunwing pilots reported that the “target appeared momentarily to them then disappeared.” Two months later, in June, an airliner on final approach to the St. Hubert airport near Montreal was notified by air traffic control of “unidentified traffic.” The airliner’s collision avoidance system confirmed the object was roughly 3.5 nautical miles ahead of the aircraft and climbing in altitude to 2,700 feet. The pilots eventually made visual contact as the object continued to gain altitude and crossed into controlled airspace without radio contact or clearance from air traffic control. A month later, air traffic controllers in Langley, B.C., reported to Transport Canada that “radar targets were coasting in and out to the Northwest (NW) of the airport” and “Random targets popping up, radar tags swapping, targets jumping to random locations.”

          Chris Rutkowski

The recently released 2019 Canadian UFO Survey indicates Canadians see about two or three unidentified flying objects a day, and while many will laugh UFOs off as being a silly fringe delusion, several sighting events reported to Transport Canada present in the 2019 survey, such as those outlined above, involve pilots coming into close proximity with unknown aerial objects, and indicate a clear risk to air safety. While the U.S. government is actively investigating UFO reports and Congress is calling for more public oversight on unknown aerial incursions, the Canadian government seems to be doing nothing.

It is easy to dismiss UFOs, or as they are called today, unidentified aerial phenomena (UAP). Nearly a century of mass media has turned a curious phenomenon into a tinfoil hat-wearing enterprise filled with extraterrestrials, martian invasions and far-future technology. It is unlikely that pilots are being harassed by pop culture aliens in flying saucers. However, our southern neighbours seem to be concerned with the fact that something is zipping around  North American airspace and no one seems to know how to deal with it.

A recent congressional report indicates that the U.S. Office of Naval Intelligence has an active task force that investigates incursions of UAP into U.S. airspace. Recently, Senator Marco Rubio, who chairs the Senate intelligence committee, introduced a congressional bill giving this intelligence-gathering operation 180 days to disclose its findings regarding these incursions. The Americans seem to consider this an important issue that needs more attention.

Canadian science writer and researcher Chris Rutkowski, who diligently collects nearly all of Canada’s UAP reports from civilian research organizations and those reported to Transport Canada, told me that Canada is experiencing a “possible public safety issue.” While Canada has had 849 reports in 2019, somewhat lower than the usual yearly average, Mr. Rutkowski disclosed that a more in-depth look into Transport Canada’s Civil Aviation Daily Occurrence Reporting System, known as CADORS, seems to portray that pilots have been reporting unknown objects frequently within Canadian airspace for decades. While many of those sightings can be attributed to misidentification or commercial drones and quadcopters, some reports defy prosaic phenomena.

READ ENTIRE ARTICLE

 

FAIR USE NOTICE: This page contains copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. ExoNews.org distributes this material for the purpose of news reporting, educational research, comment and criticism, constituting Fair Use under 17 U.S.C § 107. Please contact the Editor at ExoNews with any copyright issue.

Copyright © 2019 Exopolitics Institute News Service. All Rights Reserved.