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Research Laying Groundwork For Off-World Colonies

March 4, 2019                        (sciencedaily.com)

• The University of Central Florida’s Center for Lunar and Asteroid Surface Science’s Exolith Lab creates simulated extraterrestrial surface material, ranging from lunar soil to Martian dirt, in order to lay the “groundwork” (pun intended) for establishing off-world colonies. Their most recent study is on asteroid surfaces, which Phil Metzger, a planetary scientist at UCF and lead author of the study, published in the journal Icarus.

• The wealth management company Morgan Stanley estimates that the space economy will be worth more than $1.1 trillion by 2040. Metzger believes that by the end of the century there will be more economic activity off planet Earth than on planet Earth. “With economics moving in that direction, it’s important for us to get a head start trying to create the regulatory and engineering environments to make sure everything is done safely and justly,” Metzger says.

• The team measured meteorites’ (as reference material) mineralogical composition; elemental composition; densities of rocks and crushed rocks known as regolith; mechanical strength; magnetic susceptibility; volatile release pattern; and particle size destruction. This standardization is highly needed, Metzger said, as previous attempts at creating simulated extraterrestrial surface material have used everything from floral foam to beach sand. If tests are performed on simulant that isn’t similar to the real thing or is not suited for that test, then it makes the test results invalid.

• The team achieved a “high-fidelity simulant”, which “will be very valuable for companies doing asteroid mining, doing tests of constructions of facilities and landing pads, metal extraction and more,” says Metzger. The studies’ co-author, Dan Britt added, “I think we did a good job of producing a simulant that mimics the parent asteroidal material pretty well.”

• Metzger said the research team will continue to grade simulants created in the Exolith Lab as well as offer their grading system to simulants created in other labs. They will also be receiving feedback from the community about improvements in the grading system and will work with the American Society of Civil Engineers for consensus on having the grading standards adopted.

[Editor’s Note] They’re right about there being more economic activity off-planet than on the Earth by the end of the century. Because this is already true. According to Corey Goode, the largest and most technologically advanced secret space program is the interplanetary Corporate Conglomerate (ICC), which is made up by dozens of mega-rich, multi-national corporations on Earth that have established at least fifteen work colonies on Mars, and who know where else, to manufacture unique technology-based goods, and is conducting ongoing trade with at least nine hundred extraterrestrial species throughout the galaxy.

 

University of Central Florida researchers are already laying the groundwork for the off-world jump by creating standards for extraterrestrial surfaces. Their work was detailed recently in a study published in the journal Icarus.

“I’m firmly convinced that by the end of the century there will be more economic activity off planet Earth than on planet Earth,” says Phil Metzger, a planetary scientist at UCF and lead author of the study.

              Phil Metzger

According to the wealth management company, Morgan Stanley estimates the space economy will be worth more than $1.1 trillion by 2040.

“With economics moving in that direction, it’s important for us to get a head start trying to create the regulatory and engineering environments to make sure everything is done safely and justly,” Metzger says.

In the study, Metzger and the team of researchers outlined standards for simulated extraterrestrial surface material and then applied the standards to a simulated extraterrestrial surface material created in the Center for Lunar and Asteroid Surface Science’s Exolith Lab housed at UCF.

While extraterrestrial surface material can range from lunar soil to Martian dirt, Metzger and the researchers created standards specifically for asteroid surfaces in this study.

                      Dan Britt

The team measured mineralogical composition; elemental composition; densities of rocks and crushed rocks known as regolith; mechanical strength; magnetic susceptibility; volatile release pattern; and particle size destruction.

This standardization is highly needed, Metzger said, as previous attempts at creating simulated extraterrestrial surface material have used everything from floral foam to beach sand.

If tests are performed on simulant that isn’t similar to the real thing or is not suited for that test, then it makes the test results invalid, Metzger said.

“We have to communicate what the properties are so everyone knows its limitations so they won’t use it for a test it wasn’t designed to simulate,” Metzger said.

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Penn State Center to Focus on Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence

by Geoff Rushton                   March 4, 2019                     (statecollege.com)

• The Pennsylvania State University, or “Penn State”, has received a $2.5 million endowment from alumnus John and Natalie Patton, plus another $1 million anonymous pledge, to create “PSETI” – Penn State’s SETI program (Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence). It will be called the Penn State Extraterrestrial Intelligence Center.

• PSETI will create a “world-class SETI research program,” establish graduate curriculum to train the next generation of researchers, initiate a competitive research grants program, coordinate conferences and symposia and establish a permanent, worldwide SETI community.

• SETI is an international scientific effort that seeks to answer whether ours is the only technologically-capable species in the Milky Way galaxy. Jason Wright, an associate professor of astronomy and astrophysics who will lead the center, told Science Magazine the field has been lacking in academic training.

• SETI also has been lacking in financial support since 1993, when Congress prohibited NASA from funding it. Wright told Science that the prospect of no funding and few jobs has discouraged researchers from pursuing the field, and that he had identified only five people with doctoral degrees in SETI-related research.

 

Penn State is planning to establish an international research center dedicated to the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI), an initiative that would be one of only a few academic SETI research centers and would offer a graduate program training the next generation of researchers.

The university announced last week the first two donations, totaling $3.5 million, toward creating the Penn State Extraterrestrial Intelligence Center.

SETI is an international scientific effort that seeks to answer whether ours is the only technologically-capable species in the Milky Way galaxy. Jason Wright, an associate professor of astronomy and astrophysics who will lead the center, told Science Magazine the field has been lacking in academic training.

“There really isn’t an academic ecosystem for the field as a whole,” Jason Wright, associate professor of astronomy PSETI Center head. “You can’t work on it if you can’t hire students and postdocs.”

SETI also has been lacking in financial support since 1993, when Congress prohibited NASA from funding it. Wright told Science that the prospect of no funding and few jobs has discouraged researchers from pursuing the field, and that he had identified only five people with doctoral degrees in SETI-related research.

Penn State will draw on its infrastructure and expertise to provide PSETI with endowment funding and administrative framework. The university’s existing astronomy and astrophysics departments and centers make it a “natural home” for a new center.

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Humans Are Likely Alone in the Universe, Study Concludes

by Jeff Parsons                February 26, 2019                   (metro.co.uk)

• A new study entitled ‘Dissolving the Fermi Paradox’, by Oxford University researcher Anders Sandberg, and reported to Universetoday.com, concludes that we are the only intelligent life in the known universe.

• The Oxford research team used the famous Fermi paradox as the basis for their study. The Fermi paradox looks at the contradiction between the high probability of existence of alien civilizations and the overwhelming lack of evidence we’ve found since starting to scan the stars. The researchers incorporated new elements into the paradox equation, such as bias and uncertainty, and determined that the paradox’ conclusions of a small chance of other intelligent life existing in the universe was not accurate. Their conclusion is that we are completely alone in the universe.

• In the report goes on to say that even if we did somehow stumble across aliens, they may not be intelligent ones. “When the model is recast to represent realistic distributions of uncertainty, we find a substantial ex ante probability of there being no other intelligent life in our observable universe, and thus that there should be little surprise when we fail to detect any signs of it,” the team wrote.

• Bottom line: time to go back to those X-Files re-runs on Netflix because that’s the closest we’re going to get to any sort of alien encounter at the moment.

[Editor’s Note]  The only thing that this new study reveals, with certainty, is that the University of Oxford in England is a Deep State stronghold, spewing copious volumes of disinformation. These mainstream scientific “researchers” use pseudo-scientific intellectual gibberish to mask their stunningly ignorant “conclusion” that there is no other intelligent life in the universe except for our own. Perhaps puppet scientists and researchers, such as Anders Sandberg, should focus on a different issue: whether their kind will have any place in our scientific community once the existence of innumerable alien species throughout our galaxy, and even our historic and continuing interaction with many of them, is finally disclosed to the public. Let’s hope not.

 

In a new study published online they conclude that we are the only intelligent life in the known universe. The team used the famous Fermi paradox as the basis for their study. The paradox looks at the contradiction between the high probability of existence of alien civilisations and the overwhelming lack of evidence we’ve found since starting to scan the stars.

            Anders Sandberg

The researchers took the paradox, which was developed in the first half of the 20th century, then incorporated new elements such as bias and uncertainty. In a nutshell, they reckon it’s not as accurate as previously thought. The report is entitled ‘Dissolving the Fermi Paradox,’ and the researchers come to the conclusion we’re very much alone in the known galaxy. ”One can answer the Fermi Paradox by saying intelligence is very rare, but then it needs to be tremendously rare,’ said Anders Sandberg, a researcher at Oxford University and a lead author of the study. ‘Another possibility is that intelligence doesn’t last very long, but it is enough that one civilization survives for it to become visible,’ he told Universetoday.com.

In the report, the researchers go on to say that even if we did somehow stumble across aliens, they may not be intelligent ones. ‘When the model is recast to represent realistic distributions of uncertainty, we find a substantial ex ante probability of there being no other intelligent life in our observable universe, and thus that there should be little surprise when we fail to detect any signs of it,’ the team wrote.

‘This result dissolves the Fermi paradox, and in doing so removes any need to invoke speculative mechanisms by which civilizations would inevitably fail to have observable effects upon the universe.’ Bottom line: time to go back to those X-Files re-runs on Netflix because that’s the closest we’re going to get to any sort of alien encounter at the moment.

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