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The Pentagon Has No Intention of Sharing UFO Information

Article by Jazz Shaw                                  September 10, 2020                                         (hotair.com)

• All of the UFO/UAP (‘Unidentified Aerial Phenomena’) news this summer created a considerable excitement in the air. Florida Senator Marco Rubio made an unprecedented request for a report from the Pentagon’s UAP Task Force. Most people, civilians and government officials alike, didn’t even know we HAD a UFO task force. Then the Pentagon came out and officially announced the ‘formation’ of the task force. Then the NY Times published an article alluding to additional programs and an acknowledgment of a government “crash retrieval program” that could be in possession of “off-world materials”. Heady stuff.

• Journalist Roger Glassel contacted Pentagon UAP spokesperson Susan Gough with some specific questions about the new task force. Ms. Gough provided answers in a professional fashion, but seemingly doused most hopes for some new era of government transparency on the subject.

• Question: Will the public be informed about any findings from the UAPTF of the nature and/or origins of Unidentified Aerial Phenomena?   Answer: “[T]o avoid disclosing information that may be useful to our adversaries, DOD does not discuss publicly the details of either the observations or the examination of reported incursions into our training ranges or designated airspace, including those incursions initially designated as UAP.” (ie: “No.”)

• Question: Will the newly established UAP Task Force look into other aspects of the nature and origins of Unidentified Aerial Phenomena, or will the UAPTF just look at the aspect of UAP being a potential threat to U.S. national security?   Answer: “The Department of Defense established the [task force] to improve its understanding of, and gain insight into, the nature and origins of UAP incursions into our training ranges and designated airspace. The mission of the task force is to detect, analyze and catalog UAP incursions that could potentially pose a threat to U.S. national security. (ie: Pentagon is sticking to its position that they have no curiosity as to what these things are or where they came from, and are solely focusing on the potential national security threat, severely limiting the scope of what might be examined.)

• To summarize, the Pentagon’s UFO task force will take reports about UAP encounters if they might constitute a threat to national security and they promise to do a better job collecting and correlating such reports. But they won’t be releasing any of it for public consumption. The same goes for the Senate Intelligence Committee and the report the “requested”. That committee request may not even make it to the House bill, much less law. Furthermore, Congress hasn’t tied the request to any funding, so the DoD is under no obligation to comply. They can simply thank Congress for their input and proceed to ignore them, just as Ms Gough evaded the journalist’s questions.

• If there’s going to be any serious UFO disclosure it’s going to be up to the private sector and organizations such as Tom DeLonge’s ‘To The Stars Academy’, or whistleblowers like Luis Elizondo, or some high-ranking deathbed confessions – which the Pentagon can deny or obfuscate.

 

                 Roger Glassel

Some disappointing news on the UFO front came out this week, likely dampening the hopes of many people in the ufology community who have been eagerly looking forward to some sort of forthcoming disclosure from the government on this subject. As regular readers are already aware, there was considerable excitement in the air this summer following a number of revelations and surprising announcements on the topic of Unidentified Aerial Phenomena (UAPs). First we saw a request from the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, led by Marco Rubio, for a public report from the Pentagon’s UAP Task Force. This came as quite a surprise to people, including many in the government, who didn’t even know that we had a UAP Task Force.

           Susan Gough

That was followed by an official announcement of the formation of the task force by the Pentagon. After that, major newspapers such as the New York Times began digging into the subject, even raising the prospect of the potential disclosure of additional programs that might even include an acknowledgment of a government “crash retrieval program” that could be in possession of “off-world materials.

This led journalists in the ufology field to press the Pentagon for additional details. One such person was investigative journalist Roger Glassel, who contacted Pentagon UAP spokesperson Susan Gough with a number of specific questions about the new task force and its anticipated activities as they proceed to compile existing information on UAP encounters by the military and create channels for the collection of future reports. I first saw the article teased on Twitter.

The answers Roger received give us the disappointing news I alluded to above. Ms. Gough (which is pronounced “Goff,” by the way, as I only learned from her this week) provided Glassel with answers in a professional fashion, but seemingly doused most hopes for some new era of government transparency on the subject. Here are two of the key questions that produced bad news.

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The Pentagon Finally Admits It Investigates UFOs

by Steven Greenstreet                 May 22, 2019                 (nypost.com)

• In an ‘about face’, US Department of Defense (DoD) spokesman, Christopher Sherwood, was uncharacteristically open and honest with the NY Post about the fact that the Pentagon’s $22M ‘Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program’ which ran from 2007 to 2012 was intended to study UFOs – or “unidentified aerial phenomena” (UAPs) as they call them now – and continues to investigate extraterrestrial UFO reports. (see 4:22 minute video about the NY Post interview below)

• “The department will continue to investigate, through normal procedures, reports of unidentified aircraft encountered by US military aviators in order to ensure defense of the homeland and protection against strategic surprise by our nation’s adversaries,” said Sherwood.

• Former UFO investigator for the UK’s Ministry of Defence, Nick Pope, called the DoD’s comments a “bombshell revelation.” “Previous official statements were ambiguous and left the door open to the possibility that AATIP was simply concerned with next-generation aviation threats from aircraft, missiles and drones — as skeptics claimed,’ said Pope. “This new admission makes it clear that they really did study what the public would call ‘UFOs.’ ”

• John Greenewald Jr., of ‘The Black Vault’ government document archival website, called the Pentagon’s use of the term “unidentified aerial phenomena” unprecedented in its frankness. “I’m shocked,” said Greenwald “… they’ve seemingly worked very hard not to say that.” “[N]ow we have actual evidence — official evidence — that said, ‘Yes, AATIP did deal with UAP cases, phenomena, videos, photos, whatever.’” “[A]t least we’re one step closer to the truth.”

 

The Pentagon has finally uttered the words it always avoided when discussing the possible existence of UFOs — “unidentified aerial phenomena” — and admits that it still investigates reports of them.

Pentagon spokesman, Christopher Sherwood

In a statement provided exclusively to The Post, a Department of Defense spokesman said a secret government initiative called the Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program “did pursue research and investigation into unidentified aerial phenomena.”

And while the DOD says it shut down the AATIP in 2012, spokesman Christopher Sherwood acknowledged that the department still investigates claimed sightings of alien spacecraft.

“The Department of Defense is always concerned about maintaining positive identification of all aircraft in our operating environment, as well as identifying any foreign capability that may be a threat to the homeland,” Sherwood said.

“The department will continue to investigate, through normal procedures, reports of unidentified aircraft encountered by US military aviators in order to ensure defense of the homeland and protection against strategic surprise by our nation’s adversaries.”

Nick Pope, who secretly investigated UFOs for the British government during the 1990s, called the DOD’s comments a “bombshell revelation.”

4:22 minute New York Post video with Steven Greenstreet discussing DoD UFO disclosure

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FAIR USE NOTICE: This page contains copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. ExoNews.org distributes this material for the purpose of news reporting, educational research, comment and criticism, constituting Fair Use under 17 U.S.C § 107. Please contact the Editor at ExoNews with any copyright issue.

The Paranormal Roots of the Pentagon’s UFO Program

by Alejandro Rojas                    May 15, 2019                     (denofgeek.com)

• The Pentagon’s five-year, $22M ‘Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program’ (AATIP) UFO study program, headed by Luis Elizondo, which The New York Times revealed in a December 2017 article (see here), did not begin with interest in UFOs. It began with the Defense Intelligence Agency’s interest in the paranormal activities going on at billionaire Robert Bigelow’s ‘Skinwalker Ranch’ in Utah. The original name for the secret project was the Advanced Aerospace Weapons System Application Program (AAWSAP).

• Soon, the fundamentalist Christians within the various US intelligence agencies began to raise their religious concerns. “They’re basically high-level people in different intelligence agencies… who think that anything involving UFOs and the paranormal is satanic,” said George Knapp (the I-Team Las Vegas television journalist who has been closely following this story). “Certain senior government officials thought our collection of facts on Unidentified Aerial Phenomena (UAP) was dangerous to their philosophical beliefs,” said Elizondo. “[T]he data was a threat to their (Christian) belief system.”

• By 2008, the pressure from the Christian right to end these demonic “paranormal investigations” caused them to create a sub-group inside of AAWSAP that focused only on military UFO cases. This was AATIP. When Elizondo took over as the head of the program in 2010, he only worked within the AATIP UFO division while the DIA closed the AAWSAP paranormal division. By 2012, the AATIP was closed down as well (so they say), and Elizondo left the government to work with Tom DeLonge’s ‘To The Stars Academy’.

• The DIA had initially approached Las Vegas billionaire Robert Bigelow “to visit Mr. Bigelow’s ranch in the Uintah Basin of Utah, where he conducted research”. The original AAWSAP Paranormal division’s investigations included “bizarre creatures, poltergeist activity, invisible entities, orbs of light, animal and human injuries and much more,” according to a senior manager on the project.

• Bigelow’s first significant foray into the unknown was an organization created in 1995 called the National Institute for Discovery Sciences (NIDS). Its purpose was to conduct scientific investigations of the paranormal. Bigelow bought the Skinwalker Ranch in 1996. By the time the DIA official had approached him, Bigelow had already spent decades and large sums of money researching the paranormal.

• Among the paranormal manifestations at the Skinwalker Ranch were floating orbs and a giant wolf-like creature that attacked cattle, could withstand multiple point-blank gunshots, and seemed to disappear into thin air. On one occasion, NIDS investigators were observing the ranch from the edge of a bluff when one of them noticed a light in the forest below. The light began to grow. Once it became a couple of feet wide, they say it looked like a tunnel opening up, and they saw a creature within. It was large and black with no face. It crawled out of the light and into the dark forest. The light then began to disappear until it was gone.

• After the DIA began investigating the Skinwalker Ranch in 2007, DIA officials met with Nevada Senator Harry Reid about starting a paranormal research program. Senator Reid, a friend of Bigelow’s, shared Bigelow’s interest in the topic and found bipartisan support from a couple of fellow members of Congress to secure funding and get the project launched in 2007. Bigelow Aerospace Advanced Space Studies (BAASS) won the government contract to manage the project.

• John Alexander, a retired Colonel in U.S. Army Intelligence, helped organize NIDS investigations. “What we learned was that the events were real and tangible, and definitely occurring,” Alexander explained. “These weren’t figments of someone’s imagination, or folklore or any of these sorts of things.”

 

At the end of 2017, The New York Times broke the story of a secretive Pentagon program with a budget of $22 million to investigate UFOs called the Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program (AATIP). The man who exposed the existence of the program, Luis Elizondo, was the former head of the project. Elizondo’s ongoing efforts to investigate the UFO mystery with his new employer, the To the Stars Academy (TTSA), will be featured in a History Channel series premiering May 31 called Unidentified: Inside America’s UFO Investigation.

          Luis Elizondo and George Knapp

However, what The New York Times apparently did not know when they published their story is that the program went by a different name at its inception, and the scope of the program was much broader than just UFOs. In fact, according to a senior manager on the project, the investigations included “bizarre creatures, poltergeist activity, invisible entities, orbs of light, animal and human injuries and much more.”

It is unknown whether Undisclosed will cover the paranormal aspects of the program. Although Elizondo did work with this paranormal project, he only worked in the UFO division. By the time he was the head of the entire program, the UFO division was all that was left. The rest of the program had been shut down, and you will never guess why. It wasn’t because people inside the Department of Defense (DoD) thought the program was too weird, although some did. It was shut down because of demonic forces.

Don’t worry, demons didn’t attack the Pentagon, but apparently, some people inside the government were afraid the potentially paranormal incidents being investigated could be demonic, especially scary occurrences taking place at a ranch in Utah, and they wanted no part of it. They didn’t want the government messing with demons either, so they lobbied for the program to be ended and it was.

                    Robert Bigelow

This may sound extremely odd, but according to those involved, it’s true.

The New York Times story that broke the Pentagon UFO program began when an official with the Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) approached Las Vegas billionaire Robert Bigelow “to visit Mr. Bigelow’s ranch in Utah, where he conducted research.”

That sounds innocent enough, but what the article did not cover is what Bigelow researched at this ranch in Utah. Bigelow was known for his interest in the paranormal and UFOs, and by the time the DIA official had approached him, Bigelow had already spent decades and large sums of money researching the paranormal. Bigelow’s first significant foray into the unknown was an organization created in 1995 called the National Institute for Discovery Sciences (NIDS). Its  purpose was to conduct scientific investigations of the paranormal.

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FAIR USE NOTICE: This page contains copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. ExoNews.org distributes this material for the purpose of news reporting, educational research, comment and criticism, constituting Fair Use under 17 U.S.C § 107. Please contact the Editor at ExoNews with any copyright issue.

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