Tag: Roswell

Wernher von Braun and the Roswell Incident

 

Article by Christina Stock                           March 2, 2020                               (rdrnews.com)

• At the end of World War II, the U.S. Government brought a number of prominent German scientists to America under what was called ‘Operation Paperclip’. One of these scientists was the now legendary Wernher von Braun (pictured above), who functioned as a key figure in the design of American rocket technology, including the Saturn rocket that first took us to the moon in 1969.

• When a UFO crash occurred northwest of Roswell in early July 1947, President Harry Truman needed to make some quick decisions. As we all know, he ordered the military to cordon off the area and take control of the crash site. Truman also decided to bring in civilian scientists to examine the crashed UFO. This may have included Robert Oppenheimer and Wernher von Braun. In his book, “Is E.T. Here?”, UFO researcher Robert Trundle indicates that von Braun was indeed one of the scientists Truman brought in on the Roswell UFO crash.

• In the book, Trundle cites an account given by Clark McClelland, astronaut and former science officer with the Kennedy Space Center, who describes a memorable exchange he once had with von Braun. During one of many meetings of Cape Canaveral launch crews, McClelland and von Braun stepped outside onto a patio for a chat. The conversation drifted to the 1947 Roswell incident. Von Braun and his colleagues were working at the White Sands Testing Range near Roswell, testing captured V-2 rockets. McClelland asked von Braun whether the rumored Roswell UFO crash really happened.

• On condition that McClelland wouldn’t repeat any of it while von Braun was still alive — a pledge which McClelland kept — von Braun told McClelland that in fact he had been asked to help inspect the crashed UFO. Von Braun described the craft’s material as being a thin, unfamiliar substance more resembling some sort of skin than metal. Some pieces were like silvery chewing gum wrappers, von Braun said.

[Editor’s Note]  Wernher von Braun died in 1977. In 1978, investigative reporter Stanton Friedman interviewed former Air Force intelligence officer Major Jesse Marcel, a Roswell eye witness who said that it was no weather balloon that crashed in the desert, but a UFO. Thus, the legend of the Roswell UFO crash entered the public zeitgeist. And the silvery ‘chewing gum wrapper’ like material that von Braun mentioned? Jesse Marcel hid several sheets of it in his hot water heater at his home in Houma, Louisiana. It may still be there today. (see ExoArticle here)

 

When the UFO crash northwest of Roswell occurred in early July 1947, President Harry Truman, upon receiving that fateful phone call in the wee hours, must have needed to make some quick and shrewd decisions about what to do. As we all know, this obviously ended up including a cordoning off of the crash site and the control of that site by the military.

                     Clark McClelland

Some other actions must have been needed as well, notably including the decision to bring in some civilian scientists to examine what had to be the most remarkable object ever encountered in human history.

Various speculations and inferences over the years have been made as to who some of those experts might have been, for example, my own conclusions about consultation with Robert Oppenheimer. In addition, another interesting choice has come to light.

At the end of World War II, the U.S. Government brought a number of prominent German scientists to America, in what was called Operation Paperclip. One of these scientists was the now legendary Wernher von Braun, who functioned as a key figure in the design of American rocket technology, including the Saturn rocket that first took us to the moon in 1969.

Recently, UFO researcher George Filer has explored, published in his online journal Filer’s Files, an account given by Ufologist Robert Trundle in his book, “Is E.T. Here?” to the effect that von Braun was one of the scientists Truman brought in on the Roswell UFO crash. Trundle cites an account given by Clark McClelland, astronaut and former science officer with the Kennedy Space Center, who describes a memorable exchange he once had with von Braun.

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Why Would Our Government Lie About Aliens?

 

Article by Sarah Scoles                            February 29, 2020                                   (slate.com)

• A 2019 Gallup poll revealed that 68 percent of Americans believe that the government is hiding information about aliens and UFOs from the public. Thirty-three percent of respondents said that they believe UFOs are alien spacecraft from other worlds. So why then would the government lie about aliens? Sarah Scoles, the author of the book: They Are Already Here: UFO Culture and Why We See Saucers,offers perspective and possible answers.

• The government alone has the means, motive and opportunity to maintain a cover-up of aliens and UFOs. Even US presidents’ security clearances are need-to-know. On Jimmy Kimmel Live in 2014, Bill Clinton revealed that during his time in office, he’d asked his people to look into both Area 51 and the Roswell files. He was denied access to those secrets. When Kimmel asked whether Clinton would tell the public if he discovered that extraterrestrials, or ‘ET’, were here, Clinton replied, “yeah.” Is this simply part of the cover-up?

• The government’s primary means of cover-up is its authority to classify information, making it a crime to disclose to the public. Such secrets can be sequestered to massive military bases. The notoriously secretive Area 51 Air Force installation in Nevada spans 2.9 million acres – twice the size of Delaware. Military guards at Area 51 are authorized to use “deadly force” against civilians who try to storm the base. This is a lot of security for a base whose existence the Air Force denied until 2013. There must be something truly incredible going on inside there.

• The government has proven that it is adept at cover-ups. When the public rumor-mill heard about a “UFO” crash near Roswell, New Mexico in 1947, the Air Force used this as a cover-up for what the crash “debris” really was – a spy balloon under the ‘top secret’ Project Mogul. The point is that the US government is not above resorting to decades-long cover-ups.

• Is the government’s motive to cover-up the ET presence due to a fear of hostile ETs, or the fear of benevolent ETs ushering in an era of peace? The existence of any sort of extraterrestrials would unite us Earthlings. It would transcend national borders as we contemplated our place in a galaxy possibly teeming with life. What if benevolent ETs brought us technologies like free energy devices, warp drive propulsion, self-contained life support systems and the blueprints for spaceships? Such a technological renaissance would be a high-tech respite from international conflict.

• But under such a benevolent scenario, those currently benefiting and making a fortune off of the fossil fuel energy status quo would oppose it. A truly global society could topple national-level leadership. While ET technology would be good for the little guy, it would negatively affect the ‘powers that be’. Or perhaps the ‘powers that be’ already have such alien technology and want to keep these only to themselves. Perhaps the government wants to hide free “zero-point energy” from the public to keep big companies in business, and therefore keep the people poor and dependent on them. Or maybe the US military wants to keep this advanced technology hidden from foreign nations, giving the US an unbeatable advantage.

• No one really knows how the public would actually react to the sudden existence of extraterrestrials. In 1953, the CIA sponsored a small group of scientists and military personnel to evaluate the national security risks UFOs. Known as the Robertson Panel report, these experts warned that the public’s revelation of the existence of extraterrestrials among us would give the Soviets an opening to sow mass hysteria and panic in the United States. This sort of reasoning concludes that such hysteria could result in ‘more spying, more assassinations, the dissolution of religion’ and an increase in radicalism. This gave the government a legitimate national interest to protect.

• Alternatively, these extraterrestrials could represent an apocalyptic threat as in the movies War of the Worlds, Independence Day, and The Day the Earth Stood Still. Or maybe these aliens are benign or anti-social, and the government has determined that we are simply better off without them without making a big deal about it. The possible answers to why the government would choose to cover up the extraterrestrial presence spans a whole spectrum: They’d cause too much peace, make too much chaos, give too many people too much technology, or they’d just be a real disappointment. Believers can choose the one that makes most sense to them or tick off “all of the above.” But all of this has one certain result – there is enough of a narrative here to give ET/UFO conspiracists solid ground to support their conspiracy theories.

 

If you think the government has more information about UFOs than it’s letting on, you’re not alone. In fact, you’re in the majority. A 2019 Gallup poll revealed 68 percent of people feel that way. Thirty-three percent of all respondents said that they believe UFOs were built by aliens from outer space.

The Venn diagram center of those two groups clings to one of the most enduring conspiracy theories: The Government (it’s always with a capital G for believers) is squirreling away information about alien spacecraft. This idea appears, and has for years, on internet forums, social media, TV shows, memes, movies, and, of course, fiction, like Max Barry’s “It Came From Cruden Farm.”

Almost as interesting as any government secret is why it’s kept secret. And for alien UFOs, the conspiratorial answers span a whole spectrum: They’d cause too much peace, make too much chaos, give too many people too much technology, or, maybe—as is the case in Barry’s story—just be a real disappointment. Because the why here has so many potential answers, believers can choose the one that makes most sense to them or tick off “all of the above.”

Even powerful politicians, it turns out, think there may be more to the saucer story than meets the public eye. That’s why, when presidents become presidents, sometimes they, too, take an interest in the extraterrestrial. On Jimmy Kimmel Live in 2014, for instance, Bill Clinton revealed that during his time in office, he’d asked his people to look into both the Area 51 and Roswell files. “If you saw that there were aliens there, would you tell us?” Kimmel asked.

“Yeah,” said Clinton. (But if you’re inclined to believe in a cover-up, isn’t this affirmative just further evidence of disinformation?)

The president in Max Barry’s story similarly uses his power to seek out ufological secrets—immediately after his inauguration. The Air Force chief of staff, to the president’s surprise but perhaps not the reader’s, confesses that, yes, there is a specimen from space. It is, just as last year’s would-be raiders suspected, tucked away inside Area 51, a notoriously secretive Air Force installation in Nevada, whose existence wasn’t officially acknowledged till 2013 (although, you know, we knew).

It makes a certain sense that in this story, and in popular consciousness, the government holds these celestial secrets. After all, it alone meets the classic criteria of guilt: Means. Motive. Opportunity. Those elements make the conspiratorial conviction feel juuuust plausible enough. And if a hypothetical narrative is juuuust plausible enough, adherents have juuuust enough ground to remain standing on it—which is part of why this conspiracy theory has long, sturdy legs.

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Does Hangar 18, the Legendary Alien Warehouse, Exist?

 

Article by Sarah Pruitt                       January 17, 2020                           (history.com)

• Like Area 51, the legend of Hangar 18 at Wright Field – now Wright-Patterson Air Force Base – outside of Dayton, Ohio is one of flying saucers, extraterrestrial remains and even captured aliens secretly being held in a sealed and guarded warehouse called ‘Hanger 18’ or “the Blue Room”.

• Wright Field was home to the Air Force’s UFO investigation effort, Project Blue Book, from 1951 to 1969. Senator Barry Goldwater, Republican nominee for president in 1964, notoriously tried to gain access to the Blue Room through General Curtis LeMay, and was soundly rebuked. In 1974, a UFOlogist named Robert Spencer Carr publicly claimed that the Air Force was hiding “two flying saucers of unknown origin” inside Wright-Patterson’s Hangar 18. Carr claimed to have a high-ranking military source who saw the bodies of 12 alien beings as autopsies were being performed on them. A 1980 movie, Hangar 18, helped to cement the legend of Wright-Patt as a hotbed of the government’s UFO-related activities.

• The stories of Wright-Patterson go back to its alleged involvement in the cover-up of a UFO crash near Roswell, New Mexico in 1947. At the time, a Roswell Army Air Field press release said the Army had recovered a “flying disc” and sent it on to “higher headquarters” at Fort Worth. But Fort Worth immediately recanted the story saying it was only a weather balloon. Many UFO researchers believe that some of the debris from Roswell were sent to Wright Field and stored in Hangar 18.

• One military pilot, Oliver Henderson, told his wife that he flew a plane loaded with (flying saucer) debris, along with several small alien bodies, from Roswell to Wright Field. Children of another pilot, Marion “Black Mac” Magruder, claim that their father saw a living alien at Wright Field in 1947 and told them “it was a shameful thing that the military destroyed this creature by conducting tests on it.”

• The Air Force has categorically denied any of the rumors tying the Ohio base to UFOs and aliens. They even deny there is a ‘Hanger 18’ at Wright-Patt, although there is a ‘building 18’. In an official statement in 1985, the Air Force said, “There are not now, nor have there ever been, any extraterrestrial visitors or equipment on Wright-Patterson Air Force Base.”

• And as to the crashed saucer outside of Roswell which the Army/Air Force later claimed was a weather balloon? In 1994 the Air Force changed its story, again, saying that it was actually debris from a surveillance “balloon device” (called “Project Mogul”) that was designed to spy on nuclear research sites in the Soviet Union. (see July 1994 USAF Roswell Report featuring the Project Mogul balloon explanation here)

 

As home to Project Blue Book, ground zero for government investigation of UFOs from 1951 to 1969, Wright Field (now Wright-Patterson Air Force

Jesse Marcel with “weather balloon” debris

Base) outside Dayton, Ohio, ranks up there alongside Area 51 as a subject of enduring speculation.

Many of the rumors surrounding Wright-Patt, as it’s known for short, involve what might have gone on inside a particular building, known as Hangar 18. UFO enthusiasts believe the government hid physical evidence from their investigations—including flying saucer debris, extraterrestrial remains and even captured aliens—in this mysterious warehouse, specifically inside a sealed, highly guarded location dubbed “the Blue Room.”

The legend of Hangar 18 goes back to the supposed crash of a UFO in the desert near Roswell, New Mexico, in July 1947. According to a press release issued by the Roswell Army Air Field (RAAF) at the time, their personnel inspected the “flying disc” and sent it on to “higher headquarters.” A subsequent press release from an Air Force base in Fort Worth, Texas (assumed to be the aforementioned headquarters) claimed the disc was a weather balloon—a claim the Air Force acknowledged was untrue in 1994, admitting it had been testing a surveillance device designed to fly over nuclear research sites in the Soviet Union.

But in addition to Fort Worth, many UFO researchers believe some of the materials from Roswell were also transported to Wright Field after the crash and stored in Hangar 18, based on unsubstantiated reports from former military pilots. One, Oliver Henderson, reportedly told his wife that he flew a plane loaded with debris, along with several small alien bodies, from Roswell to Wright Field. According to the children of another pilot, WWII ace Marion “Black Mac” Magruder, their father claimed to have seen a living alien at Wright Field in 1947 and told them “it was a shameful thing that the military destroyed this creature by conducting tests on it.”

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