Tag: MUFON

Retired Air Force Major Claims Alien Was Killed at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst

Article by Erik Larsen                    September 3, 2019                       (app.com)

• John L. Guerra has published a book entitled, “Strange Craft: The True Story of an Air Force Intelligence Officer’s Life with UFOs”, wherein Guerra claims that a military police officer shot an extraterrestrial being at Fort Dix in the early morning hours of Jan. 18, 1978. Former Air Force intelligence officer Major George Filer III, now 84 and living in living in Medford, New Jersey with his wife Janet, wrote a top-secret memo about the incident.

• On a cold dark night in January 1978, a soldier was driving a military police vehicle through the woods on the Air Force side of Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst in Burlington County, NJ, in pursuit of a strange, low-flying aircraft that had been observed passing through the military installation’s airspace at about 2 am. Suddenly the soldier realized that an oval-shaped craft radiating a blue-green glow was hovering directly over his vehicle. Then a greyish-brown creature with a big head, long arms and slender body walked out of the nearby shadows and showed itself by stepping into the vehicle’s headlights. The soldier drew his .45 caliber pistol and shot the creature five times, killing it. Its remains gave off a foul-smelling, ammonia-like stench. A cleanup crew from Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Ohio flew in to retrieve the body. The retrieval crew acted as if this occurrence was not out of the ordinary.

• Major Filer arrived on base before dawn that day to prepare his daily intelligence briefing for his superior officers. Security at the base had been tightened and Filer personally observed the emergency response in the aftermath of the incident. Filer interviewed witnesses but was denied access to photos taken at the scene. The senior master sergeant on duty told Filer, “An alien has been shot at Fort Dix and they found it on the end of our (McGuire AFB) runway.” Filer asked, “Was it an alien from another country?” “No,” said the master sergeant. “[I]t was from outer space, a space alien. There are UFOs buzzing around the pattern like mad.”

• The Air Force classified everything as top secret and silenced the witnesses through national security restrictions and good old-fashioned intimidation. Everyone, that is, except Filer who has spoken publicly of the incident ever since. The local newspaper, The Trentonian, first reported about the incident in July 2007. The Air Force has repeatedly denied the claim, however, telling the newspaper that “the case was discredited as a hoax years ago.”

• The official explanation for the “misidentification” was that, in 1978, people were in a UFO frenzy with the US/USSR Space Race and the Apollo Moon missions still fresh in everyone’s minds. Earlier that year, Steven Spielberg had released his blockbuster movie, “Close Encounters of the Third Kind”, and the movie “Star Wars” had been in theaters the previous year. UFO sightings had greater credibility back then. There were 377 references to UFOs published in the press between 1977 and 1978, compared to 85 references between 2017 and 2018. Even President Jimmy Carter had acknowledged that he had seen a UFO and pledged to uncover whatever secrets about UFOs the government may have been hiding.

• Then there were the strange booms heard in the sky over the Jersey Shore and much of the East Coast between December 1977 and March 1978, which had the population on edge. One boom was so loud that it caused a tremor in southern Ocean County and the evacuation of the Oyster Creek nuclear power plant in Lacey, NJ. The booms were blamed on sonic booms from the supersonic British-French airliner, the Concorde, flying out of JFK Airport. However, subsequent booms did not conform to the Concorde’s schedule.

• Whatever happened at McGuire Air Force Base on Jan. 18, 1978, it is now part of folklore. While Filer never actually saw the dead alien, he says that he knows for a fact that the story is true. Filer claims to have seen UFOs throughout his entire life, starting at age 5 outside his boyhood home in Illinois. He later served as the state director for MUFON in New Jersey. (See a 48 minute video of George Filer describing the Fort Dix incident below.)

 

Was an alien shot and killed in the Pine Barrens of New Jersey?

A new book, titled “Strange Craft: The True Story of an Air Force Intelligence Officer’s Life with UFOs,” claims that a military police officer shot an extraterrestrial being at Fort Dix in the early morning hours of Jan. 18, 1978.

In the book by author John L. Guerra and published by Bayshore Publishing Co. of Tampa, Florida, retired Air Force Major George Filer III — a decorated former intelligence officer for the 21st Air Force, Military Airlift Command at the adjacent McGuire Air Force Base — recounts the extraordinary tale from America’s disco age.

              Ret. Major George Filer III

Filer, now 84 and living in Medford with his wife, Janet, said what has been an urban legend first promulgated by UFO enthusiasts since the early 1980s is indeed true. That’s because he was there and wrote a top-secret memo about it, he said.

In the freezing winter darkness of that day in January 1978, a bipedal creature, described as about 4 feet in height and grayish-brown in color, with a “fat head, long arms and slender body,” was shot to death with five rounds fired from a service member’s .45-caliber (military issue M1911A1) handgun.

As Guerra explains it in his book, the soldier had originally been in a police pickup truck, driving through the wilderness of the base in pursuit of a strange, low-flying aircraft that had been observed passing through the military installation’s airspace about 2 a.m. that morning.

About an hour into the drive, the soldier became aware — in typical, horror movie fashion — that the craft, oval-shaped and radiating a blue-green glow, was hovering directly over his vehicle.

That’s when the “creature” emerged from the shadows on foot, revealing itself to the soldier by stepping into the beams of the vehicle’s headlights where the panicked MP drew his weapon, ordered the alien to freeze, and he fired.

According to the retired major as told in the book, the alleged alien succumbed to its gunshot wounds on the Air Force side of what is now Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst in Burlington County; its remains giving off a foul-smelling, ammonia-like stench.

Later that morning, a cleanup crew from Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Ohio — headquarters of the National Air and Space Intelligence Center — flew in to retrieve the body, behaving as if the creature was, well, not entirely alien to them.

The Asbury Park Press reached out to the Air Force at the Joint Base for comment about this story, but never heard back.

48 minute video of incident at Fort Dix with George Filer (Delinda Jeffry YouTube)

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Beam Us Up! UFO Community Thriving in Canada

Article by Mike Drolet                      August 30, 2019                    (globalnews.ca)

• Canada has a rich history of unexplained UFO incidents, which fuels a substantial community of believers. The Canadian branch of MUFON gets reports of between 500-600 sightings per year, which is double what they had just 15 years ago. About six percent of these sightings cannot be explained.

• Victor Viggiani is a former elementary school teacher who wrote letters to the Canadian government requesting documents that detailed military contacts with UFOs. Says Viggiani, “I got one solid document out of Comox Air Force Base in September of 2001 where two CF-18’s were scrambled to chase three unknown tracks of interest.” According to the document labeled ‘secret’, a medical evacuation plane flying nearby also reported the three moving lights that were moving too fast for it to catch up. “[E]ventually the CF-18s catch up to these things,” Viggiani says. “They make contact. It says right in the document. And then the one line reads: CF-18s contact at 35,000 feet. And then after that, it’s redacted.”

• In 1967, Stan Michalak was prospecting next to Falcon Lake, Manitoba, when he came into contact with a flying saucer which left him with an odd grid of burn marks on his chest. Also in 1967, over a dozen people in different locations witnessed what they believed to be a late-night plane crash in Shag Harbour, Nova Scotia. But there was no plane or crash debris to be found.

• In 2016 an Alberta man caught a small object zoom by at an incredible speed on camera. And in 2017 a man in Squamish British Columbia video recorded a green glowing orb flying into the forest.

• Viggiani ruminates, “[T]his stuff has been going on for centuries. The human family has had a history of things from the sky. Every single Indigenous population on the planet has stories about things or people from the sky and it goes back a long, long way.”

 

Is the truth really out there?

If you believe Canadian UFO disclosure expert Victor Viggiani, stories of alien visitors have been right in front of us all along.

“The problem is this stuff has been going on for centuries,” he says. “The human family has had a history of things from the sky. Every single Indigenous population on the planet has stories about things or people from the sky and it goes back a long, long way.”

The former elementary school teacher began writing letters asking for documents from the Canadian government detailing military contacts with unknown objects.

“I got one solid document out of Comox Air Force Base in September of 2001 where two CF-18’s were scrambled to chase three unknown tracks of interest,” he says.

The documents, which are labelled secret, detail three unknown lights in the sky, Viggiani said. A medical evacuation plane flying nearby reported similar objects that were moving too fast for it to catch up.

“And then eventually the CF-18s catch up to these things,” he says. “They make contact. It says right in the document. And then the one line reads, CF-18s contact at 35,000 feet, and then after that, it’s redacted. Cute.”

The sighting is similar to what U.S. navy pilots experienced in 2014 and 2015 when UFOs were captured on their aircraft cameras moving at supersonic speeds. Video of those incidents, which were never explained, was released by the Pentagon. If there is video from the Canadian incident, Viggiani says nobody is saying.

Canada has a rich history of unexplained incidents, which is fueling a substantial community of believers.

2:24 minute video of Canadian ‘UFO experiencers’ (Global News YouTube)

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UFOs Remain Elusive Despite Decades of Study

Listen to “E49 8-01-19 UFOs Remain Elusive Despite Decades of Study” on Spreaker.
by Leonard David                      June 27, 2019                     (livescience.com)

• The Mutual UFO Network, or ‘MUFON’, celebrates 50 years of UFO investigation and research. Based in Irvine, California, the all-volunteer, nonprofit organization has endeavored since 1969 to be the ‘refuge seeking answers to that most ancient question, are we alone in the universe?’ The answer, very simply, is no.

• Jan Harzan has been the executive director for MUFON since August 2013. “I’ve seen these craft. I know they are real,” he told Space.com. “I can’t tell you where they’re from. …But they are advanced technology.” Harzan continues, “We have over 100,000 UFO cases in our files … and it’s growing. We currently have worldwide over 500 certified MUFON field investigators that go out and look at each one of these cases.”

• A MUFON Science Review Board consists of scientists with degrees in physics, chemistry, geology and electrical engineering. Their work experience includes NASA, Lockheed Martin, Northrop Grumman, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and France’s national space program, CNES. The MUFON Board reviews the best cases and strongest cases that cannot be identified as any known object.

• Nearly 34% of reports coming into MUFON can be identified, be they aircraft, rocket launches, satellites, drones, astronomical events, or even Chinese lanterns. For example, Google’s Project Loon uses high-flying balloons to bring Wi-Fi internet to rural areas. It has repeatedly prompted UFO reports. “But on the other hand,” says Harzan, “when you read some of the reports – we call it the 5% – one out of twenty – that are incredible observations by very articulate and credible people, you get about 5% of cases that are so rock solid.”

• Harzan says that these extraterrestrial beings have advanced physics that we don’t yet understand, and which our current science is incapable of understanding. “I personally believe,” says Harzan, “once we do, we’ll be out there doing the same thing that they are doing. We’re probably 20 to 30 years away from being the aliens.”

• Former UFO investigator for the U.K.’s Ministry of Defence, Nick Pope compares the UFO community, and the MUFON subset, to a “broad church” – a group of people who have a range of different views, yet bound together by a common interest. As in the UFO community, MUFON has had its disputes and feuds. Pope maintains that “None of this detracts from the fact that [MUFON] provides a valuable service to UFO witnesses, with field investigators looking into the sightings, sometimes turning up a conventional explanation and other times simply giving perplexed witnesses someone with whom to engage.”

• “MUFON is clearly at a disadvantage,” Pope says, “given that most of their members are nonscientists.” But he doesn’t think this is necessarily a problem. MUFON provides the necessary day-to-day business of investigating UFOs, with interviews, evidence gathering, tracking down leads, and double checking facts. “Scientific advice should be sought when necessary – for instance, if a soil sample needs to be checked for radioactivity,” Pope said. “I don’t think we should get too hung up on whether or not MUFON as a whole is sufficiently scientific.”

• It is becoming harder to weed out and identify “real” UFOs, Harzan admitted. In 1987, MUFON fired two investigators who labeled some MUFON-endorsed Gulf Breeze photos as a hoax and disavowed their report. This caused a stir in the organization. In 2017, MUFON lost a number of experienced investigators when they invited proponents of the breakaway “secret space program” to participate in its symposium panels in Las Vegas. Robert Sheaffer, a leading UFO skeptic says, “MUFON proclaims its dedication to the scientific method in UFO investigations, but it seldom lives up to that ideal.”

• Sheaffer also points to MUFON providing cases for the producers of the TV series “Hangar 1”, which premiered in 2014 on The History Channel, which was “almost universally panned by serious UFO investigators for its sensationalist approach. “However, it too has been extremely successful in bringing people into MUFON,” said Sheaffer.

[Editor’s Note]   I like this Jan Harzan. Harzan says that no, we are not alone. He isn’t afraid of allowing for an extraterrestrial explanation. He reports that “nearly 34% of reports coming into MUFON can be identified”, therefore 66% are not identified. And that “5% – one out of twenty – are “incredible observations by very articulate and credible people.” “Rock solid.” I agree that MUFON is no less a valid UFO organization than the “scientific” organizations such as SETI, or academic institutions such as Harvard, Oxford and the Smithsonian Museum. In fact, I prefer these citizen investigations and tend to trust their reports. These are people who are motivated by getting to the truth, and they are not likely to be bought off or influenced by Deep State agents. On the other hand, the aforementioned organizations and institutions are an obvious front for the Deep State, predisposed to refute and deny any existence of extraterrestrial UFOs at all.

 

In July, the Mutual UFO Network (MUFON) celebrates 50 years of investigating and promoting research on the unidentified flying object phenomenon. The all-volunteer, nonprofit, science-based organization has endeavored since 1969 to hunt down answers about baffling vehicles of unknown origin.

Based in Irvine, California, MUFON makes its credo clear-cut on its website: “Our goal is to be the inquisitive minds’ refuge seeking answers to that most ancient question, ‘Are we alone in the universe?’ The answer, very simply, is no. Whether you have UFO reports to share, armchair UFO investigator aspirations, or want to train and join our investigation team, MUFON is here for you. Won’t you please join us in our quest to discover the truth?”

After five decades, has there been any scientific pay dirt in studying UFOs? Are we inching closer to the truth that is perhaps out there?

Share the data

Jan Harzan is MUFON’s executive director, manning that post since August 2013.

“I’ve seen these craft. I know they are real,” he told Space.com. “I can’t tell you where they’re from. I don’t know if they are ours or belong to somebody else or whatever. But they are advanced technology.”

The world needs to understand UFOs, Harzan said. “This is real. We’ve got to put the data out there and share it. We have over 100,000 UFO cases in our files … and it’s growing. We currently have worldwide over 500 certified MUFON field investigators that go out and look at each one of these cases,” he said.

A MUFON Science Review Board (SRB) consists of scientists with degrees in physics, chemistry, geology and electrical engineering. Their work experience includes NASA, Lockheed Martin, Northrop Grumman, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and France’s national space program, CNES. The SRB reviews the best cases from the year to identify the strongest cases that cannot be identified as any known object.

Big leap

Assuming that weirdness in the sky represents an alien visitation is a big leap. But who knows?

Nearly 34% of reports coming into MUFON can be identified, be they aircraft, rocket launches, satellites, astronomical happenings — even Chinese lanterns (small hot air balloons made of paper) or the proliferating number of military, police and citizen-run drones of all shapes and sizes. For example, Google’s Project Loon, which uses high-flying balloons to bring Wi-Fi internet to rural areas, has repeatedly stirred up UFO reports.

It is becoming harder to weed out and identify “real” UFOs, Harzan admitted.

“But on the other hand, when you read some of the reports — we call it the 5%, one out of 20 — that are incredible observations by very articulate and credible people,” he said, “you get about 5% of cases that are so rock solid.”

Old beliefs

Harzan said that the No. 1 stumbling block to advancement as a civilization is holding on to old beliefs. Is our science even capable of understanding what UFOs truly represent?

“We have to be able to let go of some old beliefs, because maybe the way we think the universe works isn’t how it really works,” Harzan said. “I personally believe that these are extraterrestrial beings that have advanced physics that we don’t yet understand. And once we do, we’ll be out there doing the same thing that they are doing. We’re probably 20 to 30 years away from being the aliens.”

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