Tag: CIA

Explore the CIA’s ‘Entire Collection’ of UFO Documents Online

Article by Isis Davis-Marks                                          January 15, 2021                                       (smithsonianmag.com)

• Since he was 15 years old, John Greenewald Jr. has been researching and collecting US declassified government UFO reports, mainly through the filing of Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests. He stored his collection of UFO reports received since the 1990s in his website known as ‘The Black Vault’. Greenwald says that it was especially difficult getting any FOIA responses from the CIA. Finally, about 20 years ago, the CIA sent him a box containing a couple thousand declassified UFO documents dating back to the early 1980s which he scanned one by one and loaded onto his website repository.

• The CIA has maintained a ‘FOIA Electronic Reading Room’ of all declassified UFO files. With the revelation of a Pentagon UFO program that existed from 2007 to 2012 known as the Advanced Aviation Threat Identification Program, public interest in UFOs dramatically increased. Then the recent passage of the Covid-19 relief bill triggered a 180 day deadline for the DoD and intelligence agencies to submit a report on ‘unidentified aerial phenomenon’ – government-speak for UFOs.

• In response to the pressure to release UFO documents, the CIA began collecting their declassified UFO files for public release. “[O]ver time, the CIA made a CD-ROM collection of UFO documents, which encompassed the original records, along with the ones that took years to fight for,” says Greenwald. Greenewald purchased the CD-ROM in mid-2020 and spent several months painstakingly converting its contents into searchable PDF files. Highlights of the trove include a 1976 account in which the government’s former assistant deputy director for science and technology is handed a cryptic piece of information about a UFO, and a document centered on a strange, late-night explosion in a tiny Russian town.

• With the addition of the trove of documents on the CIA’s CD-ROM, The Black Vault now holds about 2,780 pages of CIA documents on UFOs for the public to read and download. This is said to represent the entirety of the CIA’s UFO collection. In addition, the CIA has uploaded dozens of records about UFO sightings and inexplicable events from around the world – spanning the 1940s through the early 1990s – to its FOIA Electronic Reading Room.

 

Approximately 2,780 pages of Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) documents detailing the government entity’s findings on unidentified flying objects (UFOs) are now available for anyone to read and download.

As Brandon Specktor reports for Live Science, the Black Vault’s collection features UFO-related records declassified by the CIA since the 1980s. The site’s owner, John Greenewald Jr., obtained the newly digitized documents—said by the CIA to represent the entirety of its UFO collection—by filing a series of Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests.

      John Greenewald Jr.

“The Black Vault spent years fighting for them, and many were released in the late 1990s,” writes Greenewald in a blog post. “However, over time, the CIA made a CD-ROM collection of UFO documents, which encompassed the original records, along with the ones that took years to fight for.”

Greenewald purchased the CD-ROM in mid-2020 and has spent the past several months converting its contents into searchable PDF files. Per Live Science, highlights of the trove include a 1976 account in which the government’s former assistant deputy director for science and technology is handed a cryptic piece of information about a UFO and a document centered on a strange, late-night explosion in a tiny Russian town.

“Around 20 years ago, I had fought for years to get additional UFO records released from the CIA,” Greenewald tells Vice’s Samir Ferdowsi. “It was like pulling teeth! I went around and around with them to try and do so, finally achieving it. I received a large box, of a couple thousand pages, and I had to scan them in one page at a time.”

In other recent UFO news, the CIA itself separately uploaded dozens of downloadable records about UFO sightings and inexplicable events from around the world to its FOIA Electronic Reading Room. The files span the 1940s through the early 1990s, according to Nexstar Media Wire.

The agency’s data dump arrives one month after Congress’ passage of the 5,600-page Covid-19 relief bill, which included a provision calling for UFO-related documents’ disclosure. Within 180 days of the bill’s ratification, report Steven Greenstreet and Steven Nelson for the New York Post, officials from the Department of Defense and intelligence agencies must “submit a report … to the congressional intelligence and armed services committees on unidentified aerial phenomena” (the government’s preferred term for UFOs).

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He Filmed History and Often Became Part of It

Article by Jorge Encinas                                     January 2, 2021                                         (gvnews.com)

• In 1952, Ralph Mayher enlisted in the US Marines. He had studied photography in a trade high school in Cleveland, so he was assigned as a combat photographer in a photographic unit with the Third Marine Air Wing at Opa-locka, Florida. For the next 22 years, Mayher traveled the world, documenting history as it happened – sometimes in dangerous circumstances – as a photographer for the Marine Corps and then for ABC News. He covered the Watts Riots in Los Angeles in 1965 and the Mexico City Olympics in 1968. He filmed an ABC News documentary in the Soviet Union called “Comrade Soldier,” in 1967 (pictured above), and covered the Mexican government’s brutal suppression of university protesters known as the Tlatelolco massacre in 1968.adventure

• Mayher, now 90 years old, has no shortage of amazing stories spanning his 22 years of filming newsreels. Twice he and his wife of more than 50 years, Gypsie, had attempted to write a memoir on his exploits as a news photographer. But it wasn’t until they were stuck at home during this past year’s pandemic that they had the time to finish the job. “My wife had saved detailed documents and photographs for at least 25 years,” Mayher said. “It wasn’t easy going through the material, and especially the photographs, but we enjoyed doing it. I dedicated the book to my wife because she kept all of the documents with all of our moves around the country and in and out of the country. And without her keeping these documents and photographs, we wouldn’t have had a book.” The stories shared in their new book, The Last Newsreel, were well worth the wait.

• One of Mayher’s most fascinating stories happens to be his first. When PFC Mayher had just begun his two years as a photographer in the US Marine Corps in Florida, he heard about a UFO that appeared over Miami Beach on June 28, 1952. Local television station WYVJ in Miami was willing to pay $50 for footage of the UFO. Mayher decided he was going to be the one to capture the image. He positioned himself with his 16-millimeter camera at a spot where he anticipated the UFO would return, and sure enough, it did. His camera caught a bright yellowish-orange saucer-like UFO as it flew overhead. Three crew members flying a Navy amphibious aircraft nearby confirmed the UFO sighting at the same altitude, in the same area, and on the same night. Mayher processed the photos and turned them in to the newspaper. The next day, a Miami Daily News article headlined, “Miami’s Saucer? Marine Here Snaps Disc”. Mayher never got his $50.

• By 1957, Mayher had left the Marine Corps and was working for KYW-TV in Cleveland when the station decided to do a UFO documentary. He offered up his Miami Beach UFO photos. Surprisingly, two CIA officers showed up at the TV station and wanted to see the photos. Mayher gave them some 8x10s. As the CIA officers were leaving, they “suggested” that the UFO photographs should not be used on the show. The CIA agents also told Mayher to deny that the CIA were ever involved. “What do you mean?” Mayher responded. “This is a news story, and you’re here.'” The CIA officers pointed out that Mayher could be recalled to serve six more years in the Marine Corps, referring to him as ‘corporal’ – Mayher’s last rank. After the CIA’s veiled threat, Mayher never aired the photos for the UFO documentary. In 2011, Mayher learned that his original UFO photos were now in the possession of the US Air Force.

 

     Ralph Mayher in the 1960s

Ralph Mayher has no shortage of amazing stories spanning his 22 years of filming newsreels. And thanks to a

          Ralph Mayher

little cabin fever, he put them down in black and white in a book recounting the history he recorded for the world.

Mayher, 90, said his two previous attempts to put his memories into words didn’t pan out when the stress of putting them together stalled the efforts.

But with the pandemic making travel and everyday errands ill-advised, he decided to give it another shot. And the stories in “The Last Newsreel” were well worth the wait.

Mayher, who lives in Green Valley, took up photography at a trade high school in Cleveland. In 1952, he enlisted in the Marine Corps, where his education took him straight into a photographic unit with the Third Marine Air Wing at Opa-locka, Florida.

He was a combat cameraman, but Mayher said he thankfully didn’t deploy to Korea. But his time at Opa-locka was anything but typical.

And that’s where Mayher’s story begins. A Marine, a 16-millimeter camera and a UFO.

Miami Beach

    Ralph and Gypsie Mayher

PFC. Mayher had heard about a UFO that appeared over Miami Beach on June 28, 1952, and he had a feeling it wasn’t going to be the last sighting.

He heard a local television station was willing to shell out $50 for footage of the UFO, and Mayher decided he was going to be the one to capture the image.

“So, I tell my buddies I’m going to go out and film a UFO at Miami Beach the following night, June 29, 1952,” he said. “And they all said, ‘We knew you were a little bit off your rocker, but here’s the camera. Good luck.’ I said not only thank you for the good luck, but we’re going to have a beer party when I get my 50 bucks from WTVJ in Miami.”

And, wouldn’t you know it, Mayher’s hunch paid off. His 16-millimeter camera caught the bright yellowish-orange saucer from Miami resident Herman Stern’s back patio.

“The gentleman who allowed me to go out on his patio, he thought I was crazy as well, but when the damn thing flew over, I was able to get about nine frames of film of the UFO,” he said.

It wasn’t just Mayher who saw it. Three Navy crew members flying a Consolidated PBY Catalina confirmed the UFO sighting flying at the same altitude, in the same area, on the same night.

The Miami Daily News reported the sighting in an article headlined, “Miami’s Saucer?: Marine Here Snaps ‘Disc.'”

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Colorado Springs UFO Group Attempts to Contact ETs

Article by Heidi Beedle                                        December 23, 2020                                         (csindy.com)

• When Mike Waskosky was 21 years old, he believed that there wasn’t anything to the UFO phenomenon. Then he came across Steven Greer’s Disclosure Project’s May 9, 2001, press club event on YouTube. The 2001 Disclosure Project press conference featured testimony from a number of former and retired military personnel, serious men who claimed to have witnessed undeniable proof that an advanced, non-human intelligence had visited the planet and at times even interfered with military equipment. Seeing sober-faced career military men describe unexplainable phenomena set Waskosky on a mission. “I completely did a 180 with my life after I realized I had no way of explaining all of this incredible testimony,” says Waskosky. “After I watched that two-hour presentation, I realized …I have to research everything to get to the bottom of it.”

• Waskosky’s dive into UFO research led him to Dr. Steven Greer, a medical doctor turned UFO researcher who founded CSETI (the Center for the Study of Extraterrestrial Intelligence), and Greer’s ‘CE-5 protocols’ to initiate contact with aliens and summon UFOs through meditation. In 2006, Waskosky attended Greer’s ‘Cosmic Consciousness’ training in Joshua Tree National Park, California. This weeklong training session focused on meditation practices, remote viewing training, and fieldwork at a cost ranging from $2,500 to $3,500. Although Waskosky admits to not actually seeing any ‘lights in the sky’ that week, he did hear strange tones in the desert. His fellow students claimed to have seen mysterious beings suddenly appearing and disappearing.

• When Waskosky returned home to Irvine, California, he kept up with the meditation training under the stars. “I was strongly desirous of having contact and not getting anything,” he says. But when he allowed himself to project forgiveness towards someone with whom he had been having a ‘personal situation’, he suddenly felt a feeling of love. “[W]hen I felt that forgiveness, I saw this massive flash and then (I saw) this light appear and quickly move across the sky,” says Waskosky. “I don’t hear many people with CE-5 experiences describing this level of interaction, but this has been very consistent for me now.” “When I’m in a really positive state… they will appear as either a stationary bright flash of light… or they’ll appear as what you could call a shooting star, but they move in different directions and turn.”

• Waskosky moved to Colorado Springs where he connected with other CE-5 enthusiasts. They would go out to a field and practice the protocols together. The closest they came to a contact phenomenon was a light appearing on the ground, in the distance, behind trees. “In my opinion it’s like they’re trying not to scare anyone,” he says. “I think people might be freaked out by too much contact.” This year, Waskosky’s monthly meetings were held on Zoom. They discuss things like ayahuasca experiences, past-life regression, childhood abduction experiences, the true nature of objective reality, and traditional UFO conspiracies.

• The principles behind the CE-5 protocols tapping into human consciousness has its roots in research conducted by the Stanford Research Institute and the US Army. Remote viewing is the practice of sensing unknown or distant targets with the mind, and recording those impressions for a variety of applications. During the Cold War, the DIA and the Army recognized the potential intelligence value of “psychic spies,” and conducted research into the phenomenon, building on the work started at the Stanford Research Institute in 1972 by Russell Targ and Hal Puthoff. The DIA/CIA closed the ‘Project Stargate’ program in 1995, claiming the work of remote viewers was “vague” and “general,” despite some prominent operational successes such as the 1976 locating of a downed Soviet spy plane.

• Debra Katz is a Ph.D. candidate at the University of West Georgia, and a remote viewer herself. Katz studied with remote viewer Michael Van Atta and has done research with the International Remote Viewing Association, a group founded by Targ, Puthoff and other veterans of Project Stargate. Katz says remote viewing is a skill that can be honed with time, patience and practice, and she teaches a 12-week, $1,200 course on remote viewing.

• “It’s a lot of work to do remote viewing,” says Katz. “Even with the people who aren’t showing great results, if they hang in there and really practice a lot and push themselves, I’ve had students that have blown me away.” But remote viewing isn’t an exact science, and a lot of the information she gets is vague and general. “Let’s say a target was a pyramid. You might just see one corner of the pyramid, or you might just see a triangle, but you’re not even sure. It could be a whole complete image, or a part of an image.” “[I]t doesn’t always seem to be consistent.”

• For devoted UFOlogists, such vague conclusions are the norm. It’s a “science” with enough credible evidence to spark intense curiosity, but often with frustratingly bizarre “answers” that are easily dismissed by skeptics. Still, says Waskosky, “It’s a life-changing thing to have an experience you know absolutely, one hundred percent, this is something paranormal.”

 

         Mike Waskosky

UFOs are back in the news after Haim Eshed, the former head of Israel’s Defense Ministry’s space directorate, told

  2001 Disclosure Project press conference

Israel’s Yediot Aharonot newspaper that UFOs belong to a “galactic federation” and that President Donald Trump was on the verge of revealing their existence to the public.

Here in Colorado Springs a group claims to be able to make contact with extraterrestrial intelligences using meditation and thought projection. While such claims might seem far-fetched to lay people, the principles behind the practice — the untapped potential of human consciousness — has its roots in research conducted by the Stanford Research Institute and the U.S. Army.

CE-5, or close encounters of the fifth kind, named after famed UFO researcher J. Allen Hynek’s classification scale, is a set of meditation protocols developed by Dr. Steven Greer, a medical doctor turned UFO researcher, that he claims allows humans to initiate contact with aliens — to essentially summon a UFO. Every month a group of Colorado Springs residents, led by Mike Waskosky, meets to discuss all things UFO, meditate, and potentially bear witness to strange lights in the sky.

Waskosky’s trip down the UFO rabbit hole began after he was presented with what he saw as credible evidence for the existence of UFOs.

“When I was 21 years old I had no belief in UFOs. I was in the mindset there wasn’t anything to it,” he says. “The documentaries I had watched weren’t really convincing. I randomly came across Steven Greer’s Disclosure Project’s May 9, 2001, press club event on YouTube. I completely did a 180 with my life after I realized I had no way of explaining all of this incredible testimony. It was so shocking to me that there was so much out there that wasn’t on TV, that there was so much documentation. After I watched that two-hour presentation, I realized if that’s true, if this isn’t just a big hoax, I have to research everything to get to the bottom of it.”

                           Debra Katz

The 2001 event Waskosky watched on YouTube featured testimony from a number of former and retired military personnel, serious men who were trained to fly cutting-edge aircraft or to operate nuclear weapons, who claimed to have witnessed, to them, undeniable proof that an advanced, non-human intelligence had visited the planet and at times even interfered with military equipment. Seeing sober-faced career military men describe unexplainable phenomena set Waskosky on a mission.

“I listened to 15 hours of audio from the Disclosure Project testimonies,” he recalls. “I started downloading everything I could from conspiracy websites, and I just did tons and tons of research. That led me to the point where I believed there’s definitely something to it, so maybe I should see what else Steven Greer is into. That led me to discovering his organization, CSETI [Center for the Study of Extraterrestrial Intelligence], and then five months later I attended their ‘Cosmic Consciousness’ weeklong training in November 2006. That was in Palm Springs and Joshua Tree National Park in Southern California.”

Greer’s weeklong training sessions, which range from $2,500 to $3,500 depending on facility costs, focused on meditation practices, remote viewing training and fieldwork, or actually trying to summon alien beings through meditation.

1:40:36 Corey Goode and Mike Waskosky 12-28-20 (‘SphereBeing Alliance’ YouTube)

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