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Space Officials Wooing Intelligence Airmen

Article by Rachel S. Cohen                           May 20, 2020                           (airforcemag.com)

• Space intelligence is one area the military wants to expand and refine for intelligence Airmen who opt to join the Space Force. Space Force intends to build its own core intel capabilities, separate from the Air Force, to better identify objects in space and whether they pose a threat to U.S. assets. Working with the National Reconnaissance Office, Space Force Intelligence will encompass space-based ‘intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance’ (ISR) of the low orbit space between the Earth and the Moon.

• Space Force is considering how Airmen could broaden their understanding of the space domain by working in multiple career fields, according to Colonel Suzy Streeter, Space Force’s ISR director. Building the new service from scratch allows intel professionals hold command positions usually taken by Airmen who operate satellites, for instance, said U.S. Space Command’s ISR boss, Brigadier General Leah Lauderback.

• Adding new perspectives to Space Force leadership depends on how Airmen plan out their career paths. One option is having Space Force recruit start as a ‘space operator’ for the first four years, move into intelligence for ten years, and then decide whether to jump back into space operations or remain in Space Force intel. “That will give… a more integrated approach,” said Streeter. Any intelligence professional coming up the ranks in Space Force could become ‘chief of space operations’ after three to five years. Or an Airman could enter Space Force as a traditional intelligence officer and remain so for the rest of their career. They could still dabble in space operations, as the Force needs “ISR visionaries”.

• It has also been suggested that the service bring in new officer level recruits from the other services and industry, starting them as captains and majors. This could prove beneficial for targeting, intel collection management, and cyber operations. Enlisted personnel could also be ‘streamlined’ into operations intelligence and cryptologic analysis fields.

• All intelligence Airmen can apply to join or transfer into Space Force, whether they worked for Air Combat Command, Air Force Space Command, or another USAF organization. “It is likely that the [selection] board will be looking for personnel with a wide range of experiences, to ensure that USSF does not pigeonhole itself into one way of thinking.” The Space Force is accepting transfer applications from intel Airmen through May 31.

• In October, ‘selection board’ panels staffed by senior Air Force and Space Force leaders will decide which intel, acquisition, and other space professionals will join the Space Force starting February 1st, 2021. This panel will also process promotions until the Space Force’s ‘Space Training and Readiness Command’ (‘STARCOM”) is up-and-running and able to tailor a new process to the specific needs of Space Force.

• New Space Force bases will open up for intelligence assignments that weren’t previously used by the Space Force’s predecessor, Air Force Space Command, including Nellis Air Force Base in Nevada; Lackland Air Force Base in Texas; Fort Meade in Maryland; Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Ohio; and assignments at the Pentagon and in Chantilly, Virginia.

[Editor’s Note]    Space Force Intelligence, just let us know when you would like a briefing.

 

New opportunities will open up for intelligence Airmen who opt to join the Space Force, intel officials said in a recent livestream.

Space intelligence is one area the military wants to expand and refine as a result of creating a new armed force focused on the cosmos. The Space Force envisions building its own core intel capabilities, separate from the Air Force, to better identify what and where objects are in space and if they threaten U.S. assets. The career field will work with the National Reconnaissance Office in new ways, encompass space-based ISR of the Earth below, and is pushing into cislunar orbit as well.

    Brigadier General Leah Lauderback

In March, the Air Force listed several intelligence organizations that are newly assigned to the Space Force. Some officials have suggested that the National Air and Space Intelligence Center could ramp up its help for the Space Force or spin off a separate space-focused center as well.

The Space Force is considering how Airmen could work in multiple career fields to broaden their understanding of the space domain, according to Col. Suzy Streeter, the service’s ISR director. Building the new service from scratch allows it to shake up its leadership echelons and let intel professionals hold command positions usually taken by the Airmen who operate satellites, said Brig. Gen. Leah Lauderback, U.S. Space Command intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance boss.

Adding different perspectives to Space Force leadership depends in part on how Airmen transfer in and plan out their career paths.

One staffing option gaining traction is having every member of the Space Force start as a space operator, or 13S. Someone could serve as a space operator for the first four years, move into intelligence for 10 years, and then decide whether to jump back into space operations or remain in intel, according to the presentation’s slideshow.

“That will give, really, a more integrated approach as you’re looking at futures, including, quite frankly, the chief of space operations,” Streeter said. “Why not have that open to whoever is a space professional?”

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First Chief of Space Force Sworn In

Associated Press                            January 15, 2020                          (king5.com)

• On January 14th, General John Raymond (pictured above with Vice-President Pence) was sworn in as the first ever Chief of Space Operations for the new U.S. Space Force. “Not only is (Space Force) historical, but it’s … absolutely critical to our national security and that of our allies,” Raymond said.

• President Donald Trump signed the National Defense Authorization Act into law last month to officially launch the US Space Force. While the Space Force will operate under the Department of the Air Force, it is also a distinct military branch of service.

• The renewed focus on space as a military domain reflects concern about the vulnerability of military and commercial satellites that are susceptible to disruption by Chinese and Russian anti-satellite weapons. The new Space Command will conduct operations such as enabling satellite-based navigation and communications for troops and commanders in the field and providing warning of missile launches abroad.

 

Gen. John Raymond was sworn in Tuesday as the first ever Chief of Space Operations for the new U.S. Space Force.

President Donald Trump officially launched the Space Force last month when he signed the National Defense Authorization Act into law. It will fall under the Department of the Air Force but is a distinct military service.

The role of the new Space Command is to conduct operations such as enabling satellite-based navigation and communications for troops and commanders in the field and providing warning of missile launches abroad.

“Not only is this historical, but it’s critical and this establishment is absolutely critical to our national security and that of our allies and it’s not lost on me or it’s not lost on the airmen that I am privileged to serve with,” Raymond said.

The renewed focus on space as a military domain reflects concern about the vulnerability of US satellites, both military and commercial, that are critical to US interests and are potentially susceptible to disruption by Chinese and Russian anti-satellite weapons.

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Trump Launches Space Command: Will They Fight Aliens And UFOs?

Listen to “E87 9-7-19 Trump Launches Space Command: Will They Fight Aliens And UFOs?” on Spreaker.
Article by Arthur Villasanta                      August 30, 2019                      (ibtimes.com)

• On August 29th, President Trump announced the reactivation of the United States Space Command at a White House ceremony. But the new command of the US Armed Forces won’t be fighting invading aliens or UFOs. The US Space Command is designed to meet the threat presented to U.S. military satellites by the increasingly sophisticated anti-satellite capabilities of Russia and China. Said President Trump, “Those who wish to harm the United States, to seek to challenge us on the ultimate high ground of space, it’s going to be a whole different ballgame.”

• The US Space Command was originally established in 1985 to coordinate the use of outer space by the United States Armed Forces, but was stood down in 2002. In 2018, the Department of Defense (DoD) announced the US Space Command would be reestablished as the eleventh unified combatant command under the DoD, similar in status to US Special Operations Command, US Cyber Command, US Pacific Command and US Central Command.

• The 2019 National Defense Authorization Act, signed into law in 2018, directed the reestablishment of the US Space Command under the US Strategic Command. But in December 2018, President Trump directed that the US Space Command be re-established as a full ‘unified combatant command’ with full responsibilities for fighting wars in space. It is seen as a predecessor to Trump’s US Space Force, which will ultimately become the sixth military service in the armed forces, similar to the US Army and US Navy.

• US Air Force General John W. Raymond is the current Commander of the Air Force Space Command, and he will concurrently command the US Space Command as well. Said General Raymond, “We no longer have the luxury of treating space superiority as a given. There is a growing threat. The scope, scale and complexity is concerning.” General Raymond listed the threats that the US Space Command will deal with, including jamming of GPS communication satellites, directed energy weapons, and ground to satellite missiles which China demonstrated in 2007.

 

The defunct United States Space Command (USSPACECOM) was reactivated as a unified combatant command (UCC) of the Department of Defense (DoD) in ceremonies presided over by President Donald Trump at the White House on Thursday.

Air Force General John W. Raymond

USSPACECOM becomes the 11th UCC of the United States Armed Forces. This designation makes it similar in stature to other UCCs such as U.S. Special Operations Command, U.S. Cyber Command, U.S. Pacific Command and U.S. Central Command.

Gen. John W. Raymond, USAF, is Commander of USSPACECOM. He is also the concurrent Commander of Air Force Space Command, which is a separate command from USSPACECOM.

USSPACECOM was originally established in 1985 to coordinate the use of outer space by the United States Armed Forces but was stood down in 2002. In 2018, DoD announced USSPACECOM would be reestablished as a unified combatant command.

“We no longer have the luxury of treating space superiority as a given,” said Gen. Raymond on Thursday.
“There is a growing threat. The scope, scale and complexity is concerning.”

1:27 minute video of President Trump’s Space Command ceremony (Washington Post)

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