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This UFO Hunter Was Right All Along

Article by Max Ufberg                                May 12, 2020                              (gen.medium.com)

• A decade ago, Luis Elizondo headed the Pentagon’s UFO research program, the ‘Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program’. In 2017, Elizondo left the government to work with other former government scientists and intelligence operative, and rock star Tom DeLonge, to form ‘To the Stars Academy’ (TTSA). ‘To the Stars’ was instrumental in the New York Times’ release of three UFO videos taken by Navy pilots, videos which the Department of Defense has fully acknowledged. So if we find out one day that aliens really do exist, we’ll have Luis Elizondo to thank.

• The ‘medium’ publication website, ‘GEN’, recently interviewed Elizondo about these Navy UFO videos. Elizondo says that he was “encouraged by the Pentagon’s forthcomingness and honesty”. “I remain optimistic the Pentagon will continue this trend of transparency.” This topic, however, “requires a conversation not just inside the government, but outside as well.”

• The UFO topic is fraught with stigma and taboo. The government’s release of the Navy’s UFO videos helped to establish the legitimacy of TTSA’s mission. “It’s a huge win for the American people that we can now have a conversation about UAPs without thinking about Elvis on the mothership or little green men,” says Elizondo.

• “Whether or not these videos are real is no longer up for speculation. They are real,” says Elizondo. Congress has been briefed on the video footage, and the President has acknowledged it. “For many years this topic was relegated to the fringe. Now this is a discussion we can have around the dinner table — and maybe even in the hallways of Congress.”

• Regarding those who say that the videos simply reveal atmospheric anomalies, reflections, or bugs in the system, “this doesn’t explain eyewitnesses seeing it with the naked eye. It also doesn’t explain the radar return.” Says Elizondo, “That doesn’t make sense.”

• Elizondo discussed the launch of the new TTSA mobile apps ‘SCOUT’ and ‘VAULT’, which uses “some of the most sophisticated A.I. technology we have right now.” If someone sees an anomaly in the sky, they can use the SCOUT app to immediately identify and filter out things such as a plane, a star, a planet, a meteorological effect, a weather balloon, or a rocket reentering the atmosphere. If the object remains ‘unidentified’ then it is “crunched and housed and stored” in the VAULT app, and “[a]nybody out there with a smartphone can quickly be alerted if there’s something in their sky.” With a smartphone, anyone can “triangulate and record audio and video” of the UFO. “I think we’re going to be really surprised by what we can collectively capture,” says Elizondo.

• With regard to the US government ‘covering up’ the UFO phenomenon, “… it is the job of the government to always have answers, especially from a national security perspective,” says Elizondo. “If there is a country out there with a technological capability that surpasses our own, then it is the job of our intelligence community to figure it out and warn certain individuals in our government… (But the government doesn’t) necessarily want to broadcast that something has this capability.”

• The TTSA often pushes the Pentagon to release documents and footage pertaining to UFOs. Might the TTSA’s new collaboration with the US Army Futures Command effect this whistleblower relationship? Elizondo points out that “we’re all ex-government or military intelligence officials… The fact we are working with the United States Army and other sections within the U.S. government isn’t a bad thing.”

• But as far as the government hiding information on UFOs, Elizondo says, “I (wouldn’t) want to be the last guy standing in the Pentagon saying, ‘This stuff isn’t real, nothing to see here folks’.”

 

          Luis Elizondo

If we find out one day that aliens really do exist, there’s a good chance we’ll have Luis Elizondo to thank. Elizondo works as the director of government programs with To The Stars Academy (TTSA), an aerospace and science company founded in 2017 by a physicist for the Department of Defense, a former CIA operations officer, and Blink-182 guitarist Tom DeLonge.

TTSA specializes in research around unidentified aerial phenomena — military-speak for any extraterrestrial presence in the atmosphere. Before joining TTSA, Elizondo headed the Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program at the Pentagon, an initiative secured and promoted in 2009 by Sen. Harry Reid of Nevada for the study of “anomalous” aircraft.

Soon after joining TTSA, Elizondo helped facilitate the release of three videos taken by Navy pilots of unidentified objects. Those videos quickly caught the public’s attention, thanks in part to credulous write-ups in the New York Times. Just last month, the Defense Department officially released the videos and finally acknowledged the presence of these unidentified aerial phenomena.

GEN: What was your reaction to the Pentagon’s acknowledgment of unidentified aerial phenomena in the video?

Luis Elizondo: I was encouraged by the Pentagon’s forthcomingness and honesty. This is something I have been engaged with for the last two and a half years after I left the Pentagon because I think this topic requires a conversation not just inside the government, but outside as well. I remain optimistic the Pentagon will continue this trend of transparency. Acknowledging there’s an issue is always the first step in remedying it.

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Pentagon’s UFO Videos Exposed in ‘The Basement Office’ Docu-Series

Article by Nick Pope                            May 6, 2020                              (nypost.com)

• On April 27th, the US Department of Defense confirmed that the three UAP/UFO videos taken by Navy pilots are genuine. But the DoD maintains that they don’t know what they are. If the Pentagon was hoping that the revelations about the UFO videos might be overlooked by a world focused on the coronavirus pandemic, it was wrong. The story made headlines all around the world.

• With the spotlight on the Navy videos, competing theories have been bandied about. Some think that it was some kind of pilot misperception or a glitch in the infrared cameras. Others claim that it was “black project” drone technology being blind-tested against the Navy fleet to see how they’d react. Some commentators thought Russia or China might be the culprit.

• The theory that attracted the most attention was that the mystery objects were extraterrestrial spacecraft. This writer, Nick Pope, hopes that it is extraterrestrials. The New York Post’s docu-series “The Basement Office”, in which Nick Pope is featured, probes all of these theories and puts some other classic UFO cases under the microscope. (see below for Episode 7: “Pentagon Releases Footage of UFOs”)

• If the Pentagon’s re-release of the UFO videos seems odd, their flip-flopping over the true nature of the DoD’s ‘Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program’ is truly bizarre. Since the existence of the AATIP was first revealed in December 2017, the Pentagon has changed its position on the role of the program multiple times. The Pentagon’s current position is that the program was not UFO/UAP related. Rather, it studied next-generation terrestrial aerospace threats.

• The problem is that a Defense Intelligence Agency letter to Congress (see here) listed 38 technical reports produced under the program. None of them related to Russian or Chinese aircraft. One related to the Drake Equation, used to estimate the number of civilizations in the galaxy. When Pope pointed out the disconnect, he was told the Pentagon was revising its line on the AATIP yet again. A new statement is expected soon.

• In a year when our lives have changed in ways that would have been unimaginable a few months ago, could the conspiracy theorists be right and might there be even bigger revelations ahead? Whatever happens, UFOs are now center stage in a way we’ve never seen before, being discussed seriously at the highest levels.

 

On April 27, the Department of Defense issued a statement confirming the release of three videos showing US Navy jets chasing “unidentified aerial phenomena” — that’s the approved military term for what the public calls UFOs. The videos had been in the public domain for some time, but there was always a degree of doubt about them. The Pentagon statement made it official: Yes, the videos are genuine, and no, the DOD still doesn’t know what these things are — the official categorization is “unidentified”.

                              Nick Pope

The timing of the Pentagon’s announcement drew a lot of comment. Why release these videos now, people asked, with the world’s attention focused on the coronavirus? Was this a classic example of “a good day to bury bad news”? If that was the Pentagon’s plan, it backfired badly. Perhaps because we’ve been so saturated with COVID-19 coverage, everyone was looking for something else. Far from being buried, the story made headlines all around the world.

UFOs generate controversy. The videos were debated furiously and in the resulting skeptic versus believer dogfight, competing theories were bandied about: Some people tried to explain everything in terms of pilot misperception and glitches or misreadings of the forward-looking infrared cameras on which the films were taken.

Others argued that it was “black project” technology being blind-tested against the Fleet, to see how they’d react. One hears a lot about hypersonic missiles and drone swarms these days. Given that such programs are highly classified and deeply compartmentalized, it’s possible that one part of the government wasn’t aware of what another part was doing. Other commentators thought Russia or China might be the culprit.

Inevitably though, the theory that attracted the most attention was the possibility that the mystery objects were extraterrestrial spacecraft. I’m undecided on all this, but I hope it’s extraterrestrials — martians would be much more fun than Russians. Season 2 of The Post’s docu-series “The Basement Office” will probe all of the theories, and put some other classic UFO cases under the microscope.

30:38 minute S2E7 of “The Basement Office” docu-series
entitled “Pentagon Releases Footage of UFOs” (“New York Post” YouTube)

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The Pentagon’s ‘Real Men in Black’ Investigation of Tom DeLonge’s UFO Videos

Article by Tim McMillan                           April 14, 2020                           (vice.com)

• In spite of the fact that the US Navy video recorded the ‘Tic Tac’ UFO off of San Diego in 2004 and two other UFO videos in 2015, which were published in December 2017 by the New York Times, a new report acquired by Motherboard (Vice) shows that it was the US Air Force that conducted an investigation. (see Vice article for actual report)

• The Air Force’s Office of Special Investigations (AFOSI) looked into the classification of the videos called “GoFast,” “Gimble,” and “FLIR.” (FLIR was the ‘Tic Tac’ UFO video; the Go Fast and Gimble videos were taken off of the US East Coast in 2015) (The AFOSI are known as “The Real Men in Black” in the UFO community.) The videos were ultimately released to the NY Times by Tom DeLonge’s ‘To the Stars Academy’. The AFOSI determined that while a declassification request had been made for these videos, it was never granted. Therefore, the videos were technically still classified.

• The AFOSI investigation also confirmed that Luis Elizondo did in fact run the Pentagon’s UFO program, the ‘Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program’, which did investigate UFOs. It was Elizondo who applied for the release of the three UFO videos before leaving his position as an intelligence specialist in the Under Secretary of Defense for Intelligence’s Office to join ‘To the Stars’. The Pentagon had falsely denied both the program and Elizondo’s role in it.

• While some assume that Elizondo ‘side-stepped’ regulations in releasing the videos, a former colleague claims that any process errors were the fault of the ‘Defense Office of Prepublication and Security Review’ agency, and not Elizondo. Pentagon spokesperson Susan Gough agreed with this appraisal.

• According to the report, the videos were submitted to multiple offices within the Navy for review, and it was determined they contained “No sensitive symbology or other items of concern.” The videos were determined to be “Unclassified and For official use only.” Apparently, there was some confusion as to the videos’ origin and classification status. By April 2018, both the AFOSI and the Air Force’s ‘Unauthorized Disclosure Program Management Office’ had reversed their initial finding by declaring the videos ‘unclassified’ and the matter ‘closed’.

• But why was the Air Force investigating Navy videos in the first place? In December of 2019, DoD spokesperson Susan Gough said she would look into the matter but has since failed to respond to numerous follow-up requests by Motherboard. Other journalists such as Tyler Rogoway of The War Zone have experienced similar stone-walling by the DoD.

• When asked his view, Elizondo stated, “Even though there was no wrongdoing on the part of my office, there are still elements within the Pentagon who are very sensitive about this topic and are unhappy with this information being brought forward for public discussion.”

 

A new document acquired by Motherboard shows that the Air Force launched an investigation into the release of classified UFO videos by former Blink-182 singer Tom DeLonge’s UFO outfit To the Stars Academy.

            Luis Elizondo

At the end of last year, we revealed the U.S. Air Force’s Office of Special Investigations had looked into several videos, which The Pentagon claims show “Unidentified Aerial Phenomena” or UFOs. This news was particularly curious considering the videos were initially filmed by the Navy (not the Air Force) in 2004 and 2015. Since the videos were published in a New York Times article in December 2017, the Air Force has refused to discuss anything related to UFOs.

The new document, obtained from the Air Force Office of Investigations (embedded below), shows that after that New York Times article, AFOSI looked into the classification of the released videos, called “GoFast,” “Gimble,” and “FLIR.” Originally, it found “all three videos were classified” and that, though a declassification request had been made for these videos, it was never granted. As we reported in December, AFOSI has become known as “The Real Men in Black” in the UFO community.

The AFOSI investigation also contradicts the Pentagon’s claims that Luis Elizondo, the man who says he ran the Pentagon’s UFO program, called Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program, never worked on UFOs at all.

Though his name is redacted, the investigation is clearly focused on Elizondo, who left the Pentagon, spoke to the New York Times, and has since joined DeLonge’s To the Stars Academy. Before leaving his position as an intelligence specialist in the Under Secretary of Defense for Intelligence’s Office, it was Elizondo who applied for the release of the three UFO videos.

In the years since the videos’ release, the Pentagon has contentiously denied the existence of a current Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program, and has denied that Elizondo investigated UFOs for the DoD. This appears to be disputed by this investigation. The AFOSI report states, “[Elizondo] disclosed his involvement (to several news outlets) with the Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program, which focused research issues on Unidentified Flying Objects.”

Similar to what’s implied in the OSI report, since Fall of 2019 when the Pentagon made it known the videos weren’t cleared for public release, the court of public opinion has widely assumed Elizondo was responsible for side-stepping regulations and releasing the videos before leaving the DoD.

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