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I Am Excited and Vindicated by Talk of UFOs

Article by AJ Vicens                                       November 2, 2020                                     (motherjones.com)

• Before the 2016 election, Hillary Clinton and her key staff were talking about UFOs. The issue was treated as a joke on late-night television. But time has shown that clearly there was something afoot.

• In December 2017, the New York Times published a groundbreaking story which included DoD videos of unexplained aerial objects. While credible UFO reports go back decades, the Times story advanced the UFO discussion into the mainstream media. (see previous ExoArticle) Since then, the Times has published a series of additional pieces, as have a host of other respected publications.

• In April 2019, the US Navy announced it was updating its procedures for pilots to report encounters with UFOs – to destigmatize the issue and collect better data. (see previous ExoArticle) By September, the US Navy confirmed to John Greenewald Jr. of The Black Vault website that the published UFO videos were officially “unidentified aerial phenomena”. In February 2020, Popular Mechanics published a piece concluding that “unidentified flying objects are neither myth nor figment of overactive imagination,” elaborating that evidence suggests UFOs are real.

• In June, the Senate Intelligence Committee tasked the director of national intelligence with submitting a public report outlining the government’s work on UFO/UAPs. Senator Mark Warner, the vice chair of the committee, confirmed that he had been given a classified briefing on UAPs. “The military and others are taking this issue seriously,” Warner said, “which, I think in previous generations may not have been the case.” A month later, Senator Marco Rubio, acting chair of the Senate Intelligence Committee, characterized it as a national security issue. “We have things flying over our military bases and places where we’re conducting military exercises and we don’t know what it is, and it isn’t ours,” Rubio said. “[F]rankly, if it’s something from outside this planet, that might actually be better” than the possibility novel aerial technology is being used by a foreign power. (see previous ExoArticle)

• The fact that two powerful senators are saying these sorts of things in public, with total earnestness, is huge. Greenewald, who has used the Freedom of Information Act to pry UFO documents from government vaults, agrees there is reason for optimism about further disclosures, but offered a note of caution. “The last two years have been fascinating in UAP world.” The Navy’s revelations provided renewed hope of transparency, and its acknowledgement that the objects on those famous videos were, in fact, UAPs, “was huge,” he said. “I never expected that.”

• However, Greenewald says a string of recently denied FOIA requests he filed indicates “that that door has shut,” and he warns that indications the government is taking UFOs as a serious potential threat could ultimately mean it will refuse to honestly disclose what it knows. “Whether or not we’re talking about a foreign adversary that has technology that we haven’t mastered yet, whether it’s one branch that’s being tested on by another branch of the military—which I think is a big possibility—or, what everybody wants, which is extraterrestrials, regardless, all of the above would be a national security risk,” said Greenewald.

• Greenewald is probably right. The government is not likely to tell us all it knows about these objects that can seemingly toy with the most advanced and sophisticated military equipment on the planet. But at least it’s now okay to talk about them in public. We must appreciate the wins where we can find them.

 

           Senator Marco Rubio

Over the last few years, amid the daily avalanche of scandal, corruption, and intrigue, one could be forgiven for tuning it all out in favor of something else. Anything else. One storyline I’ve found intriguing and exciting: the US government and UFOs.

               Senator Mark Warner

Before the 2016 election, I wrote a series of pieces about how Hillary Clinton and her key staff were saying interesting things about UFOs. Most laughed. The issue was treated as a joke on late-night television. But time has shown that clearly there was something afoot.

In December 2017, the New York Times published a groundbreaking story: “Glowing Auras and ‘Black Money’: The Pentagon’s Mysterious U.F.O. Program,” which included Department of Defense videos of aerial objects the government could not explain. While credible UFO reports go back decades, the Times story increased the latitude for discussion of the issue under mainstream mastheads. Since then, the Times has published a series of additional pieces, as have a host of other respected publications.

                  John Greenewald Jr.

In April 2019, the US Navy announced it was updating its procedures for pilots who wish to report encounters with UFOs to destigmatize the issue and collect better data. By September, the US Navy confirmed to John Greenewald Jr., the founder of a repository of publicly available government documents called the Black Vault, that the videos published by the Times were officially “unidentified aerial phenomena,” a the term used for “unauthorized/unidentified aircraft/objects that have been observed entering/operating in the airspace of various military-controlled training ranges.” In February 2020, Popular Mechanics published a deeply reported piece concluding that “unidentified flying objects are neither myth nor figment of overactive imagination,” elaborating that documentary evidence and people who would know both suggest “UFOs are real.”

In June, the Senate Intelligence Committee tasked the director of national intelligence with submitting a public report, with a classified annex, outlining the government’s work on “unexplained aerial phenomena.” Sen. Mark Warner (D-Va.), the vice chair of the committee, confirmed that he had been given a classified briefing on UAP. “The military and others are taking this issue seriously,” Warner said, “which, I think in previous generations may not have been the case.” A month later, Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.), acting chair of the Senate Intelligence Committee, characterized it as a national security issue. “We have things flying over our military bases and places where we’re conducting military exercises and we don’t know what it is, and it isn’t ours,” Rubio said, adding that “frankly, if it’s something from outside this planet, that might actually be better” than the possibility novel aerial technology is being used by a foreign power.

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FAIR USE NOTICE: This page contains copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. ExoNews.org distributes this material for the purpose of news reporting, educational research, comment and criticism, constituting Fair Use under 17 U.S.C § 107. Please contact the Editor at ExoNews with any copyright issue.

California, Florida Report Highest in Number of UFO Sightings

Article by Scott Harrell                                   August 27, 2020                                      (baynews9.com)

• Every so often, a new UFO sighting or the release of documents reaches the mainstream news and reignites the public’s interest in unexplained aerial phenomena. In 2019, it was the US Navy’s acknowledgement that three leaked and ultimately declassified videos were in fact UFOs. No one, however, would go so far as to say they were spaceships from another planet. This renewed the curiosity of those American who are not too skeptical to consider at least the possibility of the existence of extraterrestrial life.

• In June of 2020, the Senate Intelligence Committee chaired by Republican Florida Senator Marco Rubio included a provision in its annual authorization bill requiring various military and intelligence agencies to compile a detailed analysis on UFOs. The analysis would be declassified and available to the public, and must be completed within 180 days of the bill’s passage.

• Not everyone in the UFO-watching community is excited about the subject’s current pop-cultural hype, however. “Coverage is trendy. That’s one of the problems we have,” says Peter Davenport, director of the National UFO Reporting Center. “A lot of UFOlogists are very serious people indeed, doing serious work, and we only get covered if there’s a trend in [the culture].”

• Davenport, a former candidate for both Washington state legislature and U.S. House of Representatives who holds master’s degrees in biology and finance, has directed the NUFORC since 1994. Why did he choose to become the NUFORC Director? “Well, I saw one when I was a kid,” he says. The incident took place while he and his family were at a drive-in theater in St. Louis. “We were watching the movie, and a disturbance started brewing in the theater area,” Davenport says. “We didn’t know what it was. Then there were people walking in front of our car, looking up to the right, to the east of us. “There was an amazingly bright fire engine red object that looked something like an English rugby ball. It appeared to be almost motionless, then shot straight up, and then down behind [a building]. All of that happened in five or six seconds.” Hundreds, “if not thousands” of people witnessed the event. Since then, Davenport says he’s sighted other UFOs that he’s “reasonably certain were not made on this planet.”

• Since 1996, the NUFORC website has racked up more than 90,000 reported sightings, nearly all of them from North America. They include descriptions that run the gamut from “a series of bright spheres moved slowly, one-by-one, in a southerly direction, away from a stationary sphere” (Gloucester, Massachusetts, 7/8/18) to “White light circling a star” (Pearland, Texas, 8/14/20).

• California and Florida are the U.S. states that boast far and away the highest numbers of reported sightings, with 10,015 and 5,602, respectively. Both states are known for a lot of aerodynamic and space exploration research. “People report everything as UFOs, but I doubt that theory is correct,” Davenport says. “I can’t prove it, of course. The population, weather conditions, the fact that people are outdoors quite often [in those states]—there are many, many variables.”

 

FLORIDA — At least once or so a decade, a story about a new UFO sighting (or newly released documents about an old one) pops up on the

               Peter Davenport

mainstream media’s radar. When that happens, it always seems to instantly reignite the popular culture’s interest in unexplained aerial phenomena.
Last year, the U.S. Navy acknowledged that the objects seen in three widely leaked and ultimately declassified videos were, in fact, unidentified flying objects, in the most general sense of the term. (I.e., nobody in the military is saying they were spaceships piloted by beings from another planet.) The story was picked up by most major news outlets, and once again captured the imagination of those Americans not too skeptical to consider at least the possibility of the existence of extraterrestrial life.

That renewed curiosity has continued. In June of this year, the Senate Intelligence Committee—chaired by Republican Florida Senator Marco Rubio—included a provision in its annual authorization bill requiring various military and intelligence agencies to compile a detailed analysis of all of the other data on unexplained aerial phenomena. The analysis would be declassified and available to the public and must be completed within 180 days of the bill’s passage.

While the ostensible reason for the provision is defense against a potential threat to the U.S., its mere existence serves as evidence of the public’s continued interest.

Not everyone in the UFO-watching community is excited about the subject’s current pop-cultural hype and the public’s cycling infatuation, however.
“Coverage is trendy. That’s one of the problems we have,” says Peter Davenport, director of the National UFO Reporting Center. “A lot of UFOlogists are very serious people indeed, doing serious work, and we only get covered if there’s a trend in [the culture].”

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FAIR USE NOTICE: This page contains copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. ExoNews.org distributes this material for the purpose of news reporting, educational research, comment and criticism, constituting Fair Use under 17 U.S.C § 107. Please contact the Editor at ExoNews with any copyright issue.

Most Americans Think the US Government Would Hide Evidence of UFOs

Article by Jamie Ballard                                 July 7, 2020                           (yougov.com)

• In 2017, YouGov.com, an international research and analytics polling company headquartered in London, surveyed Americans whether a newly discovered alien species would more likely be friendly or hostile. 29% of US adults believed that the extraterrestrials would be friendly. Less then 19% thought that an alien species would be hostile towards us.

• In July 2019, a YouGov poll showed that 54% thought it was likely that the US government is withholding information it has about UFOs and extraterrestrials from the American pubic.

• Since the Senate Intelligence Committee recently authorized a bill that, if passed, would require US intelligence agencies and the Pentagon to put together a detailed analysis on all unclassified information it has on UFOs and the extraterrestrial presence, a new YouGov survey asked American if they believe that the government would share even its unclassified information with the public. 56% of the 8,000 Americans polled said that no, they did not think that the government would be forthcoming. Only 22% said they thought the government would share unclassified information with the people. On average, women were more skeptical about the likelihood of government disclosure to the public of the extraterrestrial presence.

 

In recent weeks, the Senate Intelligence Committee included language in an authorization bill that if passed, would require US intelligence agencies and the Pentagon to put together a detailed unclassified analysis of all the data they have collected on “unidentified aerial phenomenon.” But Americans aren’t necessarily convinced the government will share any evidence of UFOs with the public.

A YouGov poll of more than 8,000 US adults finds most (56%) Americans believe that if the government had evidence of UFOs, this information would be hidden from the public. About one in five (22%) believes the government would share this evidence with the public.

Men (27%) are 10 percentage points more likely than women (17%) to believe the government would share this information. That said, a majority of both men (54%) and women (58%) believe the government would hide evidence of UFOs from the public.

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FAIR USE NOTICE: This page contains copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. ExoNews.org distributes this material for the purpose of news reporting, educational research, comment and criticism, constituting Fair Use under 17 U.S.C § 107. Please contact the Editor at ExoNews with any copyright issue.

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