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Just Don’t Call Them UFOs

by Marina Koren                     April 27, 2019                      (theatlantic.com)


• Apparently, enough incidents have occurred in “various military-controlled ranges and designated airspace” in recent years to cause members of Congress to ask questions and to prompt military officials to establish a formal system to collect and analyze the unexplained phenomena. The U.S. Navy is drafting new rules for Navy officials and pilots to report such sightings. The Navy is trying to assure its pilots that they won’t be laughed out of the cockpit or deemed unhinged if they bring it up.

• While the Navy indicates it’s willing to discuss the taboo topic, it is loath to make any reference to “UFOs”. Instead, they’re called “unexplained aerial phenomena,” “unidentified aircraft,” “unauthorized aircraft,” and, perhaps most intriguing, “suspected incursions.” This is peculiar since it was the military that came up with the phrase “unidentified flying objects” in the first place.

• Government programs dedicated to investigating UFO sightings in the late 1940s treated UFO sightings as a big joke. As a rule, officials dismissed and debunked any reports as hoaxes and hallucinations. The military created Project Blue Book to investigate claims of strange objects in the sky. Its director, Edward Ruppelt, introduced the term ‘unidentified flying object’ sometime around 1953. The definition carried no hint of extraterrestrial life.

• Edward Ruppelt probably didn’t imagine the journey his three-letter abbreviation would take over the years. Military reports were careful to avoid any mention of the dreaded ‘UFO’. In 1955, Ruppelt wrote: “… facts have been obscured by secrecy and confusion, a situation that has led to wild speculation on one end of the scale and an almost dangerously blasé attitude on the other.”

• Notwithstanding, UFOs infiltrated the public consciousness. They sailed into Hollywood with stories about aliens, from friendly creatures to nightmarish monsters. The lines between fiction and reality blurred. People told harrowing stories of nighttime abductions. UFOs became the focus of conspiracy theories about government secrecy. The people who believed in UFOs and aliens were regarded as ‘crazies’, a lasting stigma surrounding UFO truthers.

• After two decades in operation, Project Blue Book eventually concluded there was “no evidence that [UFOs] were intelligently guided spacecraft from beyond the Earth.” They attributed most sightings to clouds, weather balloons, and even birds. And any project that studied UFO was deemed a waste of time and money.

• Christopher Mellon, a former deputy assistant secretary of defense for intelligence in the Clinton and Bush administrations and an advocate for UFO study, has said service members worry that reporting UFOs puts their careers at risk. They also worry that staying silent could threaten national security, in case one of those mysterious objects turns out to be a new form of aircraft from a rival country. “Nobody wants to be ‘the alien guy’ in the national-security bureaucracy,” Mellon wrote in a Washington Post op-ed last year. “Nobody wants to be ridiculed or sidelined for drawing attention to the issue.”

 

Pilots are about to receive a new memo from management: If you encounter an unidentified flying object while on the job, please tell us.

The U.S. Navy is drafting new rules for reporting such sightings, according to a recent story from Politico. Apparently, enough incidents have occurred in “various military-controlled ranges and designated airspace” in recent years to prompt military officials to establish a formal system to collect and analyze the unexplained phenomena. Members of Congress and their staffs have even started asking about the claims, and Navy officials and pilots have responded with formal briefings.

The Washington Post provided more details in its own story: In some cases, pilots—many of whom are engineers and academy graduates—claimed to observe small spherical objects flying in formation. Others say they’ve seen white, Tic Tac–shaped vehicles. Aside from drones, all engines rely on burning fuel to generate power, but these vehicles all had no air intake, no wind and no exhaust.

The Navy knows how this sounds. It knows what you must be thinking. But the fact stands that some pilots are saying they’ve seen strange things in the sky, and that’s concerning. So the Navy is trying to assure pilots that they won’t be laughed out of the cockpit or deemed unhinged if they bring it up. “For safety and security concerns, the Navy and the [U.S. Air Force] takes these reports very seriously and investigates each and every report,” the Navy said in a statement to Politico.

Yet even as the Navy indicates it’s willing to discuss the taboo topic, it’s also shying away from three notorious little letters. UFO carries an airport’s worth of baggage, bursting with urban legends, government secrecy, and over-the-top Hollywood movies. The statements and quotes that the Navy provided to news outlets are devoid of any reference to UFOs. Instead, they’re called “unexplained aerial phenomena,” “unidentified aircraft,” “unauthorized aircraft,” and, perhaps most intriguing, “suspected incursions.”

The message is, if you see something, say something, but for God’s sake, lower your voice. Don’t call it a UFO. Which is funny, since the military came up with the name in the first place.

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The Most Credible UFO Sightings and Encounters in Modern History, According to Research

by Callum Paton              April 17, 2019              (newsweek.com)

  • Unidentified flying objects (UFOs) have been recorded since ancient times. But it was Kenneth Arnold’s sighting of flying saucers near Mount Rainier in 1947 that launched the modern era of UFO sightings. The U.S. military immediately moved to discredit Arnold’s claims, along with any other claim of the existence of an extraterrestrial UFO. “The (Arnold) report cannot bear even superficial examination, therefore, must be disregarded,” the Air Force Materiel Command wrote.  With Project Blue Book, the Air Force went on to discredit every single UFO sighting until the project’s end in 1969. 
  • However, the civilian scientist who helped to run Project Blue Book, Allen Hynek, claimed that the Air Force had underplayed the credibility of UFOs. He went on to devise a classification system for grading UFO sightings – ‘close encounters of the third kind’, etc. 
  • Taking its cue from Hynek, Newsweek magazine created its own rating system for UFO sightings on a point-based system. They points are awarded, or subtracted, based on factors such as witness credibility, photographic/video evidence, flight attributes, proximity, physical effect, and discredit by the government/military.  The writer also used input from the Scientific Coalition for UFOlogy (SCU) composed of 45 UFO ‘experts’. 
  • SCU board member Robert Powell says that some 6,000 UFO encounters are reported every year. “Ninety-eight percent or more of sightings are basically misidentifications of airplanes or Chinese lanterns, or a variety of different things,” Powell told Newsweek. Chiming in, Seth Shostak, the Senior astronomer at the SETI Institute, told Newsweek, “Could the rest be alien craft?  Maybe, but that’s like saying that the 40 percent of homicides committed in New York City that are unsolved could be due to alien murderers. Possible, but not likely.” 
  • Here are 25 UFO sightings and their ‘credibility rating’ according to this Newsweek writer: 
  1. Roswell Incident – Roswell, New Mexico July 1947: Hundreds of witnesses claim an alien craft crash landed near a ranch with one or more dead extraterrestrial beings inside. In 1997, the Air Force released a report denying everything, and declaring “case closed”. Credibility Rating: -2
  1. Kenneth Arnold UFO Sighting – Mount Rainier, Washington June 1947: Pilot Kenneth Arnold witnessed nine “circular-type” objects flying in formation at twice the speed of sound. It was dismissed out of hand by an Air Force investigation. Arnold maintained his account until his death in 1984. Credibility Rating: 0  
  1. Levelland UFO Case – Levelland, Texas November 1957: Multiple witnesses reported seeing an egg-shaped object or a large flash of light moving across the sky in the small Texas town. The sighting was later discredited by the Air Force’s Project Blue Book, claiming the phenomenon had been caused by severe electrical storms and ball lightning. Credibility Rating: 0 
  2. Stephenville, Texas Sighting – Stephenville, Texas January 2008: Multiple witnesses reported seeing inexplicable objects moving through the sky or bright lights. Naval Air Station Fort Worth at first said that no planes had been active from that base that night. Then they retracted and claimed that those were their planes after all.  Credibility Rating: 0
  1. NASA Curiosity Rover Photograph – Mars March 2019: Ufologist Scott C. Waring claims to have spotted a UFO on Mars in images beamed back from NASA’s Curiosity Rover. Credibility Rating: 1 
  2. The Washington, D.C. Flap – Washington, D.C.  July 1952: On two separate occasions Air Force F-94s were scrambled over Washington after UFOs were sighted on radar at Andrews and Bolling Air Force bases. The bogeys cruised at between 100 to 130 mph before zooming off at incredible speed, outrunning the military jets. Credibility Rating: 3
  1. Valensole UFO Sighting – Valensole, Alpes-de-Haute-Provence, France
    July 1965:
    Maurice Masse claimed he saw two humanoid aliens land a spherical UFO in a field and exit the craft. The French farmer said he was left paralyzed when one of the beings pointed a cylindrical instrument at him. The pair then flew away after briefly inspecting the surroundings. Credibility Rating: 3
  1. Delphos Ring Incident – Delphos, Kansas November 1971: Sixteen-year-old Ronald Johnson claimed to have seen a glowing object hovering over a specific area close to his family farm in the early evening. When he went to fetch other witnesses the object had vanished. However, an eerie glowing ring was found where the UFO had been. Another witness corroborated to police the sighting of the strange flying object. Credibility Rating: 3
  1. Loring Air Force Base Sighting – Loring Air Force Base, Maine October 1975: On two successive nights service members reported seeing a cigar-shaped UFO hovering over Loring Air Force Base, which was also seen on radar. The government attributed it to “unidentified helicopter(s) flying out of Canada.” Credibility Rating: 3 
  2. Val Johnson Incident – Marshall County, Minnesota August 1979: On the morning on September 11, 1979, Marshall County sheriff’s deputy Val Johnson encountered what he described as a white ball of light hovering a few feet above the ground while driving on a rural section of a State Highway.  “[S]uddenly it was in the car with me”. Johnson woke up in a ditch half an hour later. His patrol car had suffered superficial damage and he had burns around his eyes.  Credibility Rating: 3 
  3. Cash-Landrum Sighting – Dayton, Texas December 1980: Betty Cash, Vickie Landrum and Colby Landrum claim they were followed by hovering disc with a single fiery thruster as they drove home in eastern Texas. When the trio abandoned their car they felt intense heat generated by the UFO. All three claimed to suffer health problems in the aftermath of the encounter.  Credibility Rating: 3 
  4. Trans-en-Provence Case – Trans-en-Provence,Var, France  January 1981:  Renato Nicolaï, a 55-year-old farmer, observed a saucer-shaped UFO land on his property at a distance of about 50 yards. The lead-colored vessel then lifted off from the ground and flew towards a nearby tree line. The case is considered remarkable because of scorch marks left by the machine, documented and extensively analysed by French authorities. Credibility Rating: 3
  1. Belgian UFO Wave – Belgium March 1990: Over a number of days, scores of individuals reported seeing strange lights in the sky over Belgium. Belgian Air Force F-16s claimed to have seen nothing.  But the European media   exploded when an image of one of the triangular UFOs emerged, which was then revealed to be a fake. Credibility Rating: 3 
  2. Phoenix Lights Phenomenon – Phoenix, Arizona March 1997: Hundreds of witnesses saw “otherworldly” lights move across the night sky over Arizona, Nevada and northern Mexico. The sighting consisted of a giant V-shaped craft with lights and a series of stationary orange and red lights hanging in the sky. Arizona’s governor at the time, Fife Symington, said. “It was bigger than anything that I’ve ever seen. It remains a great mystery.”  Credibility Rating: 3 
  3. McMinnville UFO Photographs – McMinnville, Oregon  May 1950:  Paul Trent captured images of a UFO on camera after his wife spotted a slow-moving metal disk near their farm. The images were printed in Life magazine. The pair maintained their account until their deaths. Credibility Rating: 4
  1. Shag Harbour SightingShag Harbour, Nova Scotia, Canada October 1967:  Multiple witnesses, including pilots, reported to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police that they had witnessed a UFO with many flashing lights flying over the shoreline. A dozen or so witnesses said they saw a glowing orange sphere crash into the water and then slip beneath the surface. No wreckage was ever found.  Credibility Rating: 4 
  2. The 1976 Tehran Incident – Tehran, Iran September 1976:  Two Iranian F-4 interceptor aircraft reported their equipment jammed as they approached a star-shaped UFO over the Iranian capital. Ground control equipment at Mehrabad International Airport was also affected by the strange craft. The pilot Parviz Jafari said he attempted to fire on the UFO but was unable to cause any damage. “My weapons jammed and my radio communications garbled.” Credibility Rating: 4
  1. Coyne, Mansfield Helicopter Incident – Mansfield, Ohio October 1973: Four crew members of an Army Reserve helicopter recorded a near collision with a UFO near Charles Mill Lake. The incident was corroborated by witnesses in Richland and Ashland counties who described an object or a ball of light moving in a manner inconsistent with human flight. The crew on the helicopter, piloted by Lawrence Coyne, reported seeing a 60-foot-long, cigar-shaped object with a bright green light.  Credibility Rating: 4 
  1. Nancy France Sighting – Nancy, Grand Est, France October 1982:  A biologist, M. Henri, and his wife observed a UFO that hovered for 20 minutes over their garden. The egg-shaped vessel had a shiny metallic appearance. Henri attempted to photograph the craft but found his camera had jammed. After the UFO regained altitude it moved at a speed and trajectory impossible for man-made aircraft. Credibility Rating: 4
  1. Japan Airlines Flight 1628 Incident – Alaska November 1986:  The pilot, Kenji Terauchi, and crew of a Japan Airlines cargo flight from Paris to Tokyo reported seeing strange flashing colorful lights that followed their aircraft over Alaska while the plane cruised at 35,000 feet.  Credibility Rating: 4
  1. Chicago O’Hare Airport Sighting – Chicago, Illinois November 2006: On an overcast day, United Airlines staff and pilots at Chicago O’Hare Airport reported seeing a flying saucer hovering over the airport terminal. The vessel then shot up into the air so quickly that it punched a hole in the clouds. The FAA called it a “weather phenomenon” and did not further investigate the incident.  Credibility Rating: 4
  1. Rendlesham Forest Incident – Suffolk, England December 1980: Between December 26-28, 1980, U.S. Air Force personnel stationed at RAF Bentwaters reported seeing strange lights near Rendlesham forest. The incident was never investigated. However, radar operators at the base recounted how they had observed a UFO moving too quickly for normal human flight.  Credibility Rating: 5
  1. Aguadilla Airport Incident – Aguadilla, Puerto Rico April 2013:  A UFO was seen flying at low altitude across the Rafael Hernandez Airport runway in Aguadilla, Puerto Rico. A U.S. Customs and Border Protection aircraft captured infrared video of the episode that was given to the Scientific Coalition for UFOology (SCU). The video shows the vessel travelling without lights below tree-top altitude, at speeds close to 100 mph.  Credibility Rating: 6
  1. USS Nimitz Tic-Tac UFO Incident – California Coast November 2004:  U.S. Navy pilot Cmdr. David Fravor recalled seeing “something not from this earth” – a tic-tac shaped vessel moving at great speed – while commanding a U.S. Navy strike fighter squadron during exercises some 60 to 100 miles off the coast of Baja California. He recounted observing. A separate Navy jet crew tracked the object and filmed it for more than a minute. The footage was publicized by the New York Times following following the Pentagon’s acknowledgement of its Advanced Aviation Threat Identification Program, a recent study of UFO sightings.  Credibility Rating: 6
  1. F/A-18 Super Hornet GO FASTER Video – East Coast 2015:  The third video recently released by the Pentagon shows the high-speed flight of an unidentified aircraft at low altitude by a U.S. Navy F/A-18 Super Hornet off over the Atlantic off of Virginia.
  • [Editor’s Note] All of these UFO incidents, with the exception of Scott Waring’s UFO on Mars, are credible and true, and are excellent accounts to look into.  This arbitrary rating system, however, is simply the mainstream media’s way of assuring the public that they are on top of the UFO phenomenon, and, as usual, there is nothing here to be concerned about.  But should anything new happen that might change this perspective, the mainstream media will be there to tell the people what to believe.

 

The modern era of UFO sightings began in 1947 when Kenneth Arnold, a businessman and pilot from Idaho, spotted what he believed was a formation of flying saucers near Mount Rainier in Washington. Encounters with unidentified flying objects have been recorded since ancient times, but Arnold’s sighting hooked the American public. It was the encounter that launched a thousand theories.

The U.S. military attempted to discredit Arnold’s claims. “The report cannot bear even superficial examination, therefore, must be disregarded,” the Air Force Materiel Command wrote in a now-declassified document.

As reported sightings increased and UFO obsession spread like wildfire, its flames fanned by the notorious Roswell incident, the military attempted to douse the issue. A series of UFO studies commissioned by the U.S. Air Force culminated in Project Blue Book, which wrapped up in 1969 and found no evidence of the presence of extraterrestrial vehicles on Earth or in the skies above.

The Air Force clearly hoped to put an end to the UFO craze—but the studies had the opposite effect. Josef Allen Hynek, who had overseen the Air Force efforts, broke with the military, claiming the importance of UFOs had been underplayed. His scientific analysis forms much of the basis of modern UFOlogy and his close encounters classification system is the benchmark in grading the credibility of UFO sightings.

In devising our own credibility rating system for UFO sightings, Newsweek built upon Hynek’s foundations. The astronomer and preeminent UFOlogist valued sightings that involved multiple or highly credible witnesses. We have also incorporated advances in technology into our scale. The advent of cameras and infrared devices on aircraft have presented new kinds of evidence for sightings.

The credibility scale works on a point-based system. One point is given for sightings with multiple witnesses, another for an expert witness (a pilot, air traffic controller, military or government official). One point is awarded for picture evidence and an additional point for film of a moving UFO. Unidentified flying objects can often be explained away as foreign aircraft, so an additional point is given for UFOs seen to be flying in a manner inconsistent with flight as humans know it.

Hynek also prized close encounters. Close encounters of the first kind—sightings of an object less than 500 feet away—are given one point. Close encounters of the second kind, a UFO event where a physical effect is felt (a car light breaks, extreme heat is felt, scorch marks on the ground), are given two points. Finally, close encounters of the third kind, instances where an animated pilot is seen, earn three points.

A system for removing points has also been incorporated to account for cases where military or government bodies have discredited the sightings. Three points are removed in these cases, as the baseline for credibility in the scale begins at three.

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FAIR USE NOTICE: This page contains copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. ExoNews.org distributes this material for the purpose of news reporting, educational research, comment and criticism, constituting Fair Use under 17 U.S.C § 107. Please contact the Editor at ExoNews with any copyright issue.

NEW U.S. NAVY GUIDELINES FOR REPORTING UFOS

There is an important, welcome step forward towards de-stigmatizing UFOs and learning to relate more intelligently with this clearly intelligent and highly advanced technological phenomenon. I think that the briefings by To the Star Academy of Arts and Sciences and its vital sharing of credible information about this important matter were influential for Navy decision-makers to take this important step, and publicly revealing (as reported in POLITICO) that the U.S. Navy is drafting new guidelines for reporting UFOs.

On April 23, 2019, many of us who consider that we have entered since 2017 a new phase in UFO revelations happily received an article by Bryan Bender titled

“U.S. Navy drafting new guidelines for reporting UFOs”

The LINK to the article in POLITICO is: https://www.politico.com/story/2019/04/23/us-navy-guidelines-reporting-ufos-1375290?fbclid=IwAR3fusr2VP8ZSxpvtoQ_otrF6ZrIr63E_Ivz4r3Pqs6_oLOnREI0peskrNU

The UFO/UAP/AAP phenomenon is thus gaining credibility and scientists once reluctant to study or even consider this issue should change attitudes.

Now, we need to deepen a serious, intelligent conversation about what this intelligent phenomenon means. Overall it seems to have cooperated in not forcing its presence to overtly on us but times are changing with too many verified sightings, documents, experiencer testimonies and even more formal source of videos and images with a chain of custody reaching the USG (U.S. Government).

Moreover, unique manufactured materials (metamaterials) allegedly originating in some UAPs are being studied (for instance with the collaboration of Earthtech Institute for Advanced Studies in Austin, TX) and have been found to have unique isotopic ratios not present on Earth as well as other characteristics that still seem impossible to assemble with known Earth technology.

Of course, the U.S. Navy is still not saying that we have extraterrestrials in our midst but who can manufacture such things? However, this is a step forward to de-emphasize the social taboo factor, perhaps from now on allowing military personnel to report and to talk more naturally about UFO sightings and more.

Soon (in May 2019) various episodes in the History Channel will also show new details of the investigation by TTSA (To the Stars Academy of Arts & Sciences). I believe these will serve to legitimize even more the phenomenon, possibly even leading to the acknowledgment of unique varieties of intelligences operating the advanced technological craft.

IF other intelligences are finally, unequivocally verified and officially recognized, a necessary, intelligent, exopolitical conversation must ensue beyond condemnation and fanaticism in favor or against.

SOME NECESSARY QUESTIONS for EXOPOLITICS and an Adaptive Cultural Revision (possibly leading to a long term transformation):

For instance, what legal rights and protections would we concede to some or all of these intelligences that also appear to have been here on Earth way before modern times?  Who amongst them might be our true allies?

What are their rules of engagement with us? Can we relate with at least some of them more directly, thus getting to know them better? Why are they mostly operating in a surreptitious manner?

If all space-faring ‘races’ are not benevolent towards are other space-faring ‘races’ (species) protecting us?  Should we also have a space force to defend ourselves from some of them combining our force with that of protective intelligences? Or, due to our lack of maturity, should we simply stay out of any such militarization of space in order not to attract further problems and – for now – simply trust (for instance according to the F.R.E.E. survey (found at www.experiencer.org) that a majority of encounters with the “UAP intelligences” are benevolent or have positive effects (spiritual and even healing effects) even if they are normally nerve-racking in the beginning?

How must our educational systems change to adapt to the reality of intelligences that may be culturally different, for instance, if they have been able to overcome spacetime for a long time and with it – I assume – a classical understanding of the world for which our nature and emotional-mental tendencies following physical sensory perceptions are adapted? In fact, does our human nature have the potential to adapt? Or do we need to genetic engineer ourselves or, perhaps, enhance ourselves with technology to meet the challenge? Could it be that -unbeknownst to us – we already have the genetic wherewithal and inner resources to adapt to open personal and cultural contact with these entities?

Shouldn’t we, rather, emphasize more a spiritual connection with SOURCE (the Source of all being) than a technological one? Experiencers often mention that ETs understand there is a Universal Source (“God” for some if you will and The Absolute, Tao, Budha Mind, Parabrahm, Allah and The Great Mystery for others) and some experiencers mention that some intelligent creatures work with this Source for the good of others while the Source allows others to work for themselves controlling, enslaving or stealing forms of light or energy from others. But the latter actions – while allowed by free will – have a limit that cannot be indefinitely sustained as it is a contradiction since the Source of all contingent beings in itself is giving.

How will international law have to improve if we find out that there have been a presence or even bases from otherworldly beings for centuries or thousands or millions of years in different parts of the world? What are the rules of engagement that they abide by? Is there a balance of forces among different UAP intelligences with different motivations? I believe that we should make peaceful contact with some of them.

Where are they From? 

As per the UAP intelligences are they after all displaying advanced technology from another country? Or perhaps ‘us’ from the future? An advanced civilization native from Earth but mostly hiding from us? From inhabited planets in the Solar System or from other solar systems in our universe? From physical parallel universes? From subtler physical universes? Are they ‘Transdimensional’ (using the non-physical to manifest in a variety of physical universes and to manipulate spacetime)? Do they manipulate a universal hologram information matrix and materialize where and when they need to? Do they have greater control of their present moment as Mr. Luis Elizondo suggested in a MUFON interview? Do they control retrocausality? Angels and demons (and/or at least connected with them)?

Is the development of psychic capacities and an integrative perspective needed to understand them? Are they mostly benign as most experiencers of contact tell? Are they – ultimately – us or an aspect of us?

A saucer shape in Niaux Cave, France

Flying disc-like objects depicted in a cave of Peche Merle, France?

What if God exists but they intervened in our development as a species? How will religions become more inclusivist rather than rigid and be able to join the conversation in a civil way? How will science expand to include the phenomenon of consciousness which – according to many testimonies and scientific research – appears to be inexorably linked to the UFO phenomenon?

How will our most basic concepts about the ‘nature of reality’ expand? An integral way of being may help us to adapt to the new realities thriving in forms of connectivity that transcend spacetime limitations. How do we motivate human development worldwide into a post-postmodern, integrative way of being psychologically, culturally, technologically and systemically (including our economic and political systems)?

Besides any level of a cover-up, there may be, I understand how even after genuine sightings the UFO issue tends to be dismissed or ignored by authorities WORLDWIDE. For instance, I heard from a good source that there are unknown traffics or targets detected quite regularly by the Jorge Chavez International Airport control in Lima, Perú. Unless they are too close or too visible their presence tends to be ignored for various psychological and sociological reasons.  For once, it is not acceptable to speak about it without risking one’s job because it is a TABOO. Perhaps a sense of not being able to do anything about it and the feeling that it is ‘weird’ is sufficient for most people to dismiss it as irrelevant or partially irrelevant…unless explicitly assigned to track, investigate and report them. But, should a worldwide phenomenon like this; a more technologically advanced phenomenon, posing cultural and institutional challenges like this be treated as irrelevant or perhaps as silly or as entertainment indefinitely? Definitely NOT.

But, thankfully, the situation is changing, for instance, through military officials (credible witnesses from institution that must be extremely serious about what they say and do) coming out to give their testimonies like the U.S. is doing….including the courageous former seamen and officers from the USS Nimitz strike group (here seen with Mr. Dave C. Beaty producer of the popular short film “The Nimitz Encounters”). https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H6ox_F0auwM 

A Fox News note on the issue. Navy Prepares New Guidelines for reporting UFO Sightings (Fox News, Apr 24, 2019) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JnVMsHHY7RA

Fox News. The U.S. Navy’s New Guidelines for UFOS. I’m so glad that they are coming out more openly about this. Other armed forces and countries should catch up!

 

UFO (or UAP) in FLIR System during a U.S. Navy encounter.

 

 

There are other alleged images of UFOS and encounters pertaining to the U.S. Navy but few have the verified chain of custody to the USG. However, these and other cases add up.

 

Official footage released by Chile. Instead of maintaining an excessive, rigid attitude of denial, is the public U.S. Navy policy catching up with that of other countries like Chile? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iEK3YC_BKTI

Shouldn’t we all “catch up” now?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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