Tag: Kenneth Arnold

Are Drones the Worst Thing to Happen to UFOs Since Orson Welles?

Article by David MacQuarrie                                   November 10, 2020                                     (dronedj.com)

• In 1938, actor/ director Orson Welles frightened listeners with his Halloween prank radio broadcast of a Martian invasion in War of the Worlds. For years after that, the skies remained more or less clear of extraterrestrial menace. Then in 1947, pilot Kenneth Arnold says he spotted flying objects skipping like saucers over the Cascade Mountain Range near Seattle. This time there was no Orson Welles to blame it on. UFOs became part of the cultural landscape. When we see lights in the sky, they’re usually blamed on the planet Venus, aircraft, oddball reflections or swamp gas (uh, swamp gas?) Still, there is a minority of reports that defy easy explanation.

• Drones have become the go-to explanation for any mysterious lights in the sky. This month, people were startled to see mysterious lights in the skies over Milwaukee, Wisconsin. But they turned out to be drones practicing for a Christmas Pageant light show over a festival park. People in New Jersey reporting a UFO were told it was a police drone. Factories in Shenzhen and Hong Kong, China have filled the skies with hundreds of thousands drones.

• “A significant amount of UFOs that we investigate are hobby drones,” said Ken Jordan, Texas’ chief of investigations for the international Mutual UFO Network. A high-flying aircraft moving at impossible speeds can be mistaken for a low-flying drone puttering along at 20 k/h. Acrobatics that seem to defy the laws of physics are now on routine display at drone airshows, no extraterrestrial technology needed.

• Even when the New York Times published US Navy videos of strange objects flying off the East Coast of the US, the Navy pilots assumed they were drones. They didn’t especially look like drones, but really what else could they be? Perhaps the mothership is parked ominously just behind the Moon and is sending its vile horde of drone-shaped legions toward our unsuspecting planet. Perhaps we should be vigilant like the character Ned Scott in The Thing from Another World: “Keep watching the skies”. But if you do see something up there, it’s probably just a drone.

 

This month, mysterious lights startled some people looking to the skies in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Readers of this

               TX MUFON’s Ken Jordan

website will already know there is no mystery; the UFO lights at Maier Festival Park were just drones practicing for a Christmas Pageant light show.

But there’s a long history of alarming lights in the sky and earthlings assuming it just can’t be good.

Actor/ Director Orson Welles frightened many listeners in 1938 with his Halloween prank radio broadcast of War of the Worlds. It’s controversial just how many people actually feared Martian invasion. But a lot of listeners felt silly once the hoax was revealed, and CBS fought at least one lawsuit. For years after that, the skies remained more or less clear of extraterrestrial menace.

Until 1947. That’s when pilot Kenneth Arnold says he spotted flying objects skipping like saucers over the Cascade Range near Seattle. This time there was no Orson Welles to ‘fess up. UFOs were with us and became part of the cultural landscape.

Most turn out to be sightings of the planet Venus, aircraft, oddball reflections or swamp gas. (Really? Who’s fooled by swamp gas?)
Still, there was always a tiny minority of reports that defied easy explanation.

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Hunting UFOs at an Alien Ranch in Washington State

Article by Andrea Kasprzak                                     October 29, 2020                                           (thrillist.com)

• Since 1986, the ECETI Ranch located in the small town of Trout Lake, Washington, has been hosting people from all over the world who are interested in stargazing, alternative healing, and connecting with positive otherworldly beings. Short for “Enlightened Contact with Extraterrestrial Intelligence”, ECETI draws people from May through September to the ‘Sky Watch Weekends’ when, for a $15 donation, you can watch UFOs traverse the night sky.

• A five-hour drive south from Seattle, the ECETI compound is found at the end of a long rural road through the woods where white flags wave from pine trees and lenticular clouds loom over the majestic, white-capped Mt. Adams in the distance. There is no cell phone service. The grounds are dominated by wildflowers and even some grazing yaks. Visitors may stay overnight at the main lodge, a private cabin, or just camp out – for a fee. The ranch has a strict ‘no drugs or alcohol’ policy. Accommodations can best be described as celestial summer camp: bunk beds, few frills, many dream catchers.

• A mysterious orange watchtower is where James Gilliland, the tie-dyed and ponytailed founder and proprietor of ECETI, records his weekly radio show, As You Wish, which delves into galactic mysteries and the existence of Big Foot with various free-thinking guests.

• Gilliland claims that after near-death experiences body surfing, he saw visions of Mt. Adams. Drawn to the region, Gilliland studied the Native American lore which goes back centuries. Native American legend tells of a secret doorway into the mountain, from which otherworldly beings with healing powers would emerge. (It was near Mt. Adams that in 1947 pilot Kenneth Arnold made the first UFO sighting in modern history.) Gilliland tells his visitors that there are five different species of aliens that currently live in the base of Mt. Adams.

• At sunset, people gather in the “Field of Dreams” for the evening’s sky-watching and story-telling – tales of astral travel, Egyptian souls, and UFO encounters. No paranormal topic is taboo. Strapping on a pair of night vision goggles, Gilliland leads the “SkyWatch” as everyone stares up at the night sky. Using a laser pointer, Gilliland directs the sky-watchers attention to small balls of light traveling across the night sky, occasionally flashing, dimming and pulsating.

• There at the ranch – far away from city lights – the night sky is black as ink. But when you put on a pair of night vision goggles, the night sky lights up with stars that appeared to glow light green. The lights in the sky over ECETI seem unusually active as they whiz to and fro at various speeds. The ECETI website identifies these hovering lights as “metallic craft,” “ships,” and “large luminous objects.”

• Gilliland creates excitement by anticipating a “power up” of one of the UFOs as the people watch. During a power up, these UFOs will ‘throw off tremendous energies’, expanding to several times their original size. They seem to be under intelligent control, responding to the energies and thoughts of the people below urging them to “power up”. Then the ball of light momentarily enlarges and flashes to the cheers of the crowd. (see an ECETI promotional video and a video of a “power up” below)

 

         James Gilliland

“So I saw this place on a late night documentary and I’ve always wanted to go,” my friend Ash pinged me one day.

I clicked through to the homepage for ECETI, short for “Enlightened Contact with Extraterrestrial Intelligence.” Located on a ranch in the small town of Trout Lake, Washington, ECETI professes a mighty mission: “To help with public awareness of the E.T. reality and to assist people with connecting to positive otherworldly beings.”

“This looks like a Christopher Pike novel,” I typed back. “I’m in.”

After a five hour drive south from Seattle, we arrived at the ranch. It’s entrance was marked by ECETI’s official logo: a winged golden heart with a lion’s face. Continuing down the long, wooded road, our cell phone signals cut out. White flags of peace flapped from the pine trees. Lenticular clouds loomed over the majestic, white-capped Mt. Adams in the distance.

I felt like I had fallen off the map of reality and into the pages of some YA fantasy fiction.

                     Mt. Adams

ECETI FOUNDER JAMES GILLILAND has been hosting people at his ranch since 1986. Seekers from all over the world come to stargaze, explore alternative healing techniques, and speculate about the possibility that we’re not alone in the universe. The biggest draw is the SkyWatch Weekends, which Gilliland hosts May through September. The hope is that, for a $15 donation, you can see some UFOs.

Arriving with zero expectations, Ash and I parked in the dirt lot and went inside the main lodge to pay for a night’s stay. (While you don’t have to stay overnight to attend a SkyWatch, we opted for the full experience.) Visitors can camp out on the property for a suggested donation of $10 a night, or shack up in a guest room, yurt, or private cabin ($75-$125). Accommodations can best be described as celestial summer camp: bunk beds, few frills, many dream catchers.

Paying cash (this is not a credit card kind of place), Ash gently nudged me and pointed to the man standing behind us. “That’s James.”

With his tie-dyed shirt and scrappy ponytail, James Gilliand looks more like a Deadhead than the self-appointed wingman for interdimensional beings. Gilliland claims he saw visions of Mt. Adams after several near-death experiences body surfing. He was drawn to the lore of this region, which goes back centuries: One Native American legend told of a secret doorway in the mountain, from which otherworldly beings with healing powers would emerge. And it was near Mt. Adams that, in 1947, pilot Kenneth Arnold made the first UFO sighting in modern history.

“There’s five different species of aliens that live in the base of the mountain,” Gilliland told us, as nonchalantly as someone placing their morning coffee order.

We smiled, nodded, and scurried off to explore the property. Like Pee Wee’s Playhouse for the paranormal, there are wildflowers as far as the eye can see, a handful of yaks wandering around, and a mysterious orange watchtower. I later learned this is where Gilliland records his weekly radio show, As You Wish, which speculates about galactic mysteries and the existence of Big Foot with various free-thinking guests.

3:45 minute ECEIT Ranch promo with James Gilliland (‘ECETI Stargate Official YouTube Channel’ YouTube)

40 sec ‘Major Power Up & 2 Crafts’, July 2016 (‘ECETI Stargate Official YouTube Channel’ YouTube)

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Bonnybridge/Falkirk Triangle and Roswell UFO Hotspots; and Recovered ‘Alien’ Prints

Article by Ron McKay                               July 5, 2020                              (heraldscotland.com)

• Scotland has its own ‘Area 51’ hotspot of UFO sightings known as the Falkirk Triangle, centered on Bonnybridge (in central Scotland between Edinburgh and Glasgow) where 300 sightings are reported annually. It began in 1992 when James Walker was driving between Falkirk and Bonnybridge and stopped when he spotted a shining, star-shaped object hovering over the road, blocking his path. Then the object just flew away at “an incredible speed”.

• Other residents of the Falkirk Triangle have reported a “howling” UFO that buzzed their car; a cigar-shaped craft seen landing on a local golf course; being abducted and taken aboard an alien craft for examination, and then having their mind wiped. Local politician Billy Buchanan has demanded inquiries with three letters to the Prime Minister. “How do we know aliens aren’t walking about?” Buchanan said in 2005.

• In July of 1947, Dan Wilmot and his wife were sitting on their porch near Roswell, New Mexico just before 10pm when they witnessed “a large glowing object (that) zoomed out of the sky”, hovering, and then vanished at high speed. The Roswell Daily Record newspaper famously quoted an Air Force intelligence officer that a ‘flying saucer’ had been recovered on a nearby ranch. The term ‘flying saucer’ has been coined just days before by an amateur pilot named Kenneth Arnold who watched a formation of UFOs fly past Mount Rainier in Washington State.

• The military quickly reversed their assessment, calling it a downed weather balloon. But the Roswell incident resurfaced in 1978 when a former Air Force intelligence officer, Jesse A Marcel, mentioned seeing the crash and the alien occupants to a ham radio correspondent, who told UFO researcher Stanton Friedman. In 1947, Marcel was in charge of security for the atomic weapons research program both at the Roswell Army Air Base and in the Pacific where they planned to detonate atomic bombs.

• Major Marcel’s son, Jesse Junior, then 11, later claimed that he handled pieces of alien material. It was also later reported that a nurse at the base said she had been present at autopsies of three creatures which had been recovered from the crash debris. The nurse was never identified and was said to have died in a plane crash. In July 1997, days before the 50th anniversary of the Roswell crash, the US Air Force released a 231-page report – The Roswell Report: Case Closed – which stated that there was no UFO crash, and the recovered bodies were crash test dummies.

• In 2012, Joseph Beason inherited a series of color slides from his sister who, 14 years earlier, had been hired to dispose of the belongings of an old woman and she couldn’t bring herself to throw away the undeveloped Kodachrome film. Years passed until she got round to looking at them. They appeared to be post-war pictures of General Dwight Eisenhower on a victory train tour, accompanied by Clark Gable and Bing Crosby. There were also contemporary shots taken in European capitals. But two of the slides were wrapped in parchment. It appeared to be a small, brown creature with withered arms, shriveled legs and a large, triangular skull with gaping eye sockets lying in a glass case. (see featured image above) She was sure it was a dead space alien.

• Beason and his videographer friend, Adam Dew, found that the slides had belonged to a women named Hilda Blair Ray in Arizona. An analysis by Kodak confirmed the prints had not been tampered with and dated them to between 1945 and 1950, the time frame of the Roswell incident. The news started to leak out, and in May 2015, 7,000 people paid up to $86 to attend ‘BeWitness’, a four-hour show in Mexico City’s grandest theater where, after innumerable speakers and ufologists, the slides were projected onto huge screens.

• Soon afterward, an online enthusiast screennamed Neb Lator, examined the high-resolution image using an internet software program called Smart DeBlur Pro and managed to decipher an indistinct placard below the glass case holding the “alien”. It read, “Mummified body of two year old boy… At the time of burial the body was clothed in a (unreadable) cotton shirt. Burial wrappings consisted of these small cotton blankets. Loaned by Mr (unreadable) San Francisco, California.”

• The mummy, claimed to be that of a Native American child, was previously on display at the Chapin Mesa Archeological Museum in Mesa Verde, Colorado. It had been discovered in a series of cave dwellings cut into Arizona cliffs in 1896 and later donated to the museum. Had it been an elaborate scam to make a quick buck? The two men own up to a grand mistake on their part but deny any fraud.

[Editor’s Note]   Does this look like a mummified, 2-year old human child to you? Just because it was found in 1896 and was in an Arizona museum doesn’t mean it can’t be an alien body. Get Dr. Steven Greer and Emery Smith on it. They’re experts in small, mummified alien beings.

 

                     The Falkirk Triangle

Dan Wilmot and his wife were sitting on their porch reflecting on the day. It was a few minutes before 10 in the evening, the brutal sun had given way to a balmy evening and the New Mexico sky was clear when, in their words, “a large glowing object zoomed out of the sky”, hovered, and then disappeared from view at high speed.

                Dan Wilmot and wife

They both ran to their garden fence to try to follow its path before it vanished.

Six days later the local daily newspaper reported – quoting the intelligence officer from the local air force base – that a flying saucer, which had crashed into scrub at Foster’s Ranch, had been recovered.

   Major Jesse A Marcel

That report, in the Roswell Daily Record on this day in 1947, set off either one of the world’s greatest conspiracy theories – or a monumental and successful cover-up which makes the JFK affair look like child’s play.

The story was quickly denied. It was said to be an experimental weather balloon. And there it may well died had not that intelligence officer, Jesse A Marcel, allegedly bound for decades by official secrets, subsequently mentioned it to a ham radio correspondent who, in 1978, told Stanton Friedman, a UFO researcher. The aliens were out of the closet, or coffin.

                       Billy Buchanan

The Roswell air base in 1947 was the centre of the United States’ atomic weapons research programme. Marcel was in charge of security, not just there but in the Pacific where tests were planned to take place. His son, Jesse Jnr, then 11, later claimed that he handled pieces of the craft. Even later it was reported that a nurse at the base said she had been present at autopsies of three creatures which had been recovered from the debris. Both Marcels are dead (but you can see their accounts on YouTube), the nurse was never identified and, as in most of these mysteries, she is said to have conveniently died in a plane crash.

In July 1997, just days before the 50th anniversary of the crash when spectators would flock to Roswell, the US Air Force released a 231-page report – The Roswell Report: Case Closed – which rubbished the theories and explained that the three aliens were crash test dummies. Closure? It was merely proof for ufologists that the state secrecy about what really happened in what was known as Area 51 was being reinforced.

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