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UFOs Are Real, and We Should Know What They Are

June 3, 2019                        (pressherald.com)

• US Navy pilots reported in 2014/2015 regularly seeing impossibly fast and agile UFOs over the East Coast. The Navy issued new guidelines for reporting UFOs. The Department of Defense admitted that it investigated UFOs from 2007 to 2012 (and beyond!). It is clear that the US government is now (finally) taking UFOs seriously.

• When the UFO sightings first occurred, pilots thought it was mistaken radar which had been recently upgraded. When they began picking them up visually, the pilots thought they might be dealing with high-tech drones from some classified program. When the “drones” almost collided with them multiple times over multiple altitudes, they knew it wasn’t their own government flying these things. These UFOs could reach 30,000 feet and fly at hypersonic speeds, yet there was no sign of an engine or exhaust. They could stop, accelerate and turn much too fast for human pilots to endure. The UFOs could stay up there all day, while the Navy jets could only fly for an hour.

• It is good that the stigma of addressing the existence of UFOs is removed because the government should not hide this stuff from the public just for the sake of hiding it, especially when the public has been documenting UFOs for decades. Also, treating the UFO phenomenon with secrecy and ridicule does not help the military effectively deal with them.

• If some foreign adversary has such advanced technology, we need to know. If it is something from another world, we shouldn’t hide from that realization. The size and age of our galaxy makes the presence of other life forms mathematically possible (if not probable). If some ET civilization could reach us, they would certainly be more technologically advanced.

• The Romans were scared of the 7-foot-tall, pale white beings who lived in the forests to their far north. Eastern Europeans thought they were being attacked by an alien force when the Mongols first swept through. The European settlement of the New World was a collision of two vastly different worlds. Maybe humans and extraterrestrials can get it right this time.

 

From the summer of 2014 through March 2015, The New York Times reported last week, Navy pilots regularly encountered impossibly fast and agile aircraft while training over the East Coast. To this day, they have no explanation for them.

They are, in the truest sense of the phrase, unidentified flying objects.

As a result of the reports, made by several highly trained aviators with years of experience in the military’s top aircraft, the Navy issued pilots new guidelines for dealing with unexplained aerial phenomena.

The new guidelines formalized a process that has taken place for decades. The public airing of these guidelines, and the confirmation in 2017 of a government operation tasked with investigating aerospace threats, is seen as an indication that the military has accepted the existence of UFOs — whatever their origin — and is taking them seriously.

That’s good for a few reasons — most of them not having much to do with fears over a real-life “War of the Worlds.”
First, it’s healthy to remove the stigma from unexplained phenomena. There is no reason for the U.S. government to have so much secrecy around these sightings when the military, astronomers and everyday Americans have been documenting them for decades. While most of these sightings eventually can be explained – as something innocuous, such as a trick of the light, or a failing of our own human senses — studies have found 5 percent to be reliable yet inexplicable.

We should be able to talk about these mysteries – all of us, government included – without such forced secrecy. The government shouldn’t get to hide this stuff from us just for the sake of hiding it.

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Unidentified Review: History Series Takes UFOs to a New Level of Credibility

by Alejandro Rojas                    May 20, 2019                    (denofgeek.com)

• ‘History’ (formerly ‘The History Channel’) is set to debut its new six-part docuseries entitled: ‘Unidentified: Inside America’s UFO Investigation’. The show basically follows the ongoing investigations by Tom DeLonge’s ‘To The Stars Academy of Arts and Sciences’ (TTSA), and introduce the Academy members as credible investigators and witnesses. With a former career intelligence officer (Luis Elizondo), a former Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Intelligence (Chris Mellon), and multiple jet fighter pilots (David Fravor, et al), it becomes clear that research into what the hell UFOs are is more legit than ever.

• TTSA was formed in the fall of 2017. Elizondo left his Pentagon position and joined the TTSA team saying that the Department of Defense (DoD) was not taking the subject of UFOs seriously enough. They made a name for themselves in December 2017 when their efforts resulted in the New York Times revealing the Pentagon’s ‘Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program’ (AATIP) and releasing Navy cockpit video of UFO, including the infamous “Tic Tac” UFO from 2004. History’s Unidentified intends to provide insight into AATIP investigations and TTSA’s more recent discoveries.

• The first episode will review in detail this 2004 incident where F-18 fighter jets from the US Navy’s Nimitz carrier group off of San Diego encountered the remarkable maneuvering of a 40-foot long ‘Tic Tac’ UFO. The wingmate of the F-18 piloted by Commander David Fravor when they encountered the ‘Tic Tac’ UFO – who has declined any public interviews thus far – will give her own testimony in the initial episode regarding the incident.

• Unidentified has a similar feel as other investigation focused reality shows. But instead of wild speculation or leaps in logic that strain credulity, Unidentified offers a more grounded perspective on a topic that the general public typically regarded as “out of this world.”

• “Both Chris Mellon and Lou Elizondo are closely involved with what’s going on inside the Pentagon over the course of this last year,” said Executive Producer Anthony Lappe. “They consider that Navy announcement (on new UFO reporting procedures) to be a huge victory for sort of everything they’ve been doing behind the scenes and we were able to chronicle that.”

• Another episode will focus on the 1980 UFO incident on a U.S Air Force base in the Rendlesham Forest, in England. Elizondo says that there will be other astounding cases presented from the AATIP files that have not yet been made public.

 

The first episode of Unidentified: Inside America’s UFO Investigation on History Channel uses a familiar format to deliver an unprecedented investigation. UFO reality shows have come and gone, but what makes Unidentified unique is the credibility of the show’s investigators and witnesses. From a former career intelligence officer, a former Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Intelligence, and multiple jet fighter pilots, it becomes clear that research into what the hell UFOs are is more legit than ever.

Unidentified follows the ongoing UFO investigations of Luis Elizondo and To The Stars Academy (TTSA). Elizondo is a former intelligence officer who resigned in October 2017. That same month, former Blink-182 frontman Tom DeLonge announced the creation of TTSA, an organization focused on researching the unknown with an impressive list of members. Elizondo was on that list. During the press conference announcing TTSA, Elizondo claimed he left his job at the Pentagon because one of his posts entailed researching military UFO cases and he felt the Department of Defense (DoD) was not taking the subject seriously enough.

The following December, the New York Times, followed by Politico and The Washington Post, published articles providing more insight into Elizondo’s former UFO program, called the Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program (AATIP). The story garnered headlines around the world and created public interests into the nature of the secretive Pentagon project. History’s Unidentified intends to provide insight into AATIP investigations and TTSA’s more recent discoveries.

Unidentified will be a six-part series. The first episode introduces us to the TTSA team members and covers a fantastic UFO encounter as told by the witness, all of whom were on active duty with the Navy when the contacts took place.

The New York Times article that broke the AATIP story also included details about one of the most exciting AATIP cases. Over several days in November of 2004, the Nimitz Aircraft Carrier Strike Group captured objects on radar that performed unusual maneuvers. During a training exercise, several F-18 jet fighters were diverted to get a closer look at one of the objects. Commander David Fravor got the best view. He describes seeing an object that looked like a 40-foot-long white Tic Tac that performed remarkable maneuvers. This case, also covered by Den of Geek, is reviewed in detail in the first episode of Unidentified.

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FAIR USE NOTICE: This page contains copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. ExoNews.org distributes this material for the purpose of news reporting, educational research, comment and criticism, constituting Fair Use under 17 U.S.C § 107. Please contact the Editor at ExoNews with any copyright issue.

The Pentagon Finally Admits It Investigates UFOs

by Steven Greenstreet                 May 22, 2019                 (nypost.com)

• In an ‘about face’, US Department of Defense (DoD) spokesman, Christopher Sherwood, was uncharacteristically open and honest with the NY Post about the fact that the Pentagon’s $22M ‘Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program’ which ran from 2007 to 2012 was intended to study UFOs – or “unidentified aerial phenomena” (UAPs) as they call them now – and continues to investigate extraterrestrial UFO reports. (see 4:22 minute video about the NY Post interview below)

• “The department will continue to investigate, through normal procedures, reports of unidentified aircraft encountered by US military aviators in order to ensure defense of the homeland and protection against strategic surprise by our nation’s adversaries,” said Sherwood.

• Former UFO investigator for the UK’s Ministry of Defence, Nick Pope, called the DoD’s comments a “bombshell revelation.” “Previous official statements were ambiguous and left the door open to the possibility that AATIP was simply concerned with next-generation aviation threats from aircraft, missiles and drones — as skeptics claimed,’ said Pope. “This new admission makes it clear that they really did study what the public would call ‘UFOs.’ ”

• John Greenewald Jr., of ‘The Black Vault’ government document archival website, called the Pentagon’s use of the term “unidentified aerial phenomena” unprecedented in its frankness. “I’m shocked,” said Greenwald “… they’ve seemingly worked very hard not to say that.” “[N]ow we have actual evidence — official evidence — that said, ‘Yes, AATIP did deal with UAP cases, phenomena, videos, photos, whatever.’” “[A]t least we’re one step closer to the truth.”

 

The Pentagon has finally uttered the words it always avoided when discussing the possible existence of UFOs — “unidentified aerial phenomena” — and admits that it still investigates reports of them.

Pentagon spokesman, Christopher Sherwood

In a statement provided exclusively to The Post, a Department of Defense spokesman said a secret government initiative called the Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program “did pursue research and investigation into unidentified aerial phenomena.”

And while the DOD says it shut down the AATIP in 2012, spokesman Christopher Sherwood acknowledged that the department still investigates claimed sightings of alien spacecraft.

“The Department of Defense is always concerned about maintaining positive identification of all aircraft in our operating environment, as well as identifying any foreign capability that may be a threat to the homeland,” Sherwood said.

“The department will continue to investigate, through normal procedures, reports of unidentified aircraft encountered by US military aviators in order to ensure defense of the homeland and protection against strategic surprise by our nation’s adversaries.”

Nick Pope, who secretly investigated UFOs for the British government during the 1990s, called the DOD’s comments a “bombshell revelation.”

4:22 minute New York Post video with Steven Greenstreet discussing DoD UFO disclosure

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FAIR USE NOTICE: This page contains copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. ExoNews.org distributes this material for the purpose of news reporting, educational research, comment and criticism, constituting Fair Use under 17 U.S.C § 107. Please contact the Editor at ExoNews with any copyright issue.

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