Classified CIA Files ‘Reveals Who Jesus Really Was – and Coming End of Days’

by Henry Holloway                     April 21, 2019                    (dailystar.co.uk)

• Declassified files contained in the CIA archives include the book “The Adam and Eve Story” by Chan Thomas (click here), dating from 1966. Thomas appears to have been a UFO researcher working on a project for the US Air Force. Thomas begins his book with dedications to a string of the top US military brass, saying without them “this book might not exist”. He specifically mentions US Air Force Generals Curtis LeMay and Harold Grant, and CIA intelligence officer Admiral Rufus Taylor.

• One revelation that Thomas makes in the book is that the Earth is subject to “cyclical pole shifts” every 7,000 years. Thomas claims there are “null zones” in the Milky Way through which our solar system passes every few thousand years, which cause cataclysmic changes to Earth such as the poles shift. These cataclysmic events have been foretold by figures throughout history, including Jesus. The most recent cataclysm was Noah’s Flood. Another revelation is that Jesus was not a prophet of Jerusalem, but a scholar who trained in India. Yet, Jesus had predicted a coming global disaster and wanted to prepare people for the end times.

• Thomas claims to have translated Jesus’s dying words on the cross, speaking in an Indian dialect, “I am fainting, I am fainting, darkness is overcoming me”. And when Jesus ascended to heaven, he was actually picked up by a “space vehicle” according to Thomas.

• Thomas says that the Genesis story in the Old Testament is actually a parable about the collapse of a previous civilization due to an extinction event before Noah’s Flood.

• It is believed that Thomas was part of a team employed by aerospace firm McDonnell Douglas and led by Dr Robert Wood, who has since gone on to become a prominent expert on UFOs. Wood names Thomas in an article published in 2007 as one of the men he employed to research UFOs. Wood describes the author as an “exceptionally innovative” man who “claimed to be in contact with ETs”, and a “total out of the box thinker”.

• Thomas’s book was originally published in 1963 and 1965 – with a copy entering the CIA files in 1966. It then went unpublished again until 1993 and hasn’t been published since. But full versions of the book can be found online. Internet conspiracy forums have stumbled across the book this year, and Google Trends reveals interest in the book has increased by 700% over the past 12 months.

• So why would the CIA initially classify this document? In the book’s closing, Thomas writes: “To all of those who ridiculed, scorned and laughed, relegating me to the nuthouse and even firing me… “For how else would I have been so driven to pursue, solve, find and derive the truth. I owe them.”

[Editor’s Note]  This information is strikingly similar to the information that Corey Goode, David Wilcock, other insiders and prominent channelers have revealed about an imminent “solar event” that will occur within the next ten years or so, due to our solar system drifting into an energetic ‘rift’ in this part of the galaxy which has caused all of the planets in our solar system, including the Earth, to see an increase in temperature as well as volcanic and seismic activity. This is said to be a precursor to a possible pole shift, which may have caused the continent of Atlantis to shift to the South Pole some 12,000 years ago to become Antarctica. It is said that this energetic event will trigger those humans on Earth who are prepared, to ascend to a fourth density of consciousness, and will usher in a thousand-year “Golden Age” on Earth. Those who are woefully unprepared will return to a third density existence elsewhere until their next opportunity to ascend in roughly 25,000 years.

 

Declassified files from the CIA archives reveal the strange book “The Adam and Eve Story” by Chan Thomas, dating from 1966.

It is contained in a packet of other documents alongside an article from Time magazine – and a “transmittal slip”.
Listed on the handwritten document includes a toolbox, tire gauges, key holder and fender repair kit.

The book – written by author Chan Thomas – makes a string of outrageous claims about the history of the world and a coming cataclysm linked to the Bible story of Noah’s Flood.

Daily Star Online can reveal Thomas appears to have been a UFO researcher working on a project for the US Air Force.
Reasons for the CIA’s classification of this text and the other items is unknown, but it’s resurfacing has inflamed conspiracy theories.

Handwritten on the front of the scanned book is “for Art L., from”, with the second name redacted by the CIA – suggesting the text may have been seized from someone given it as a gift.

Thomas makes a series of claims in the book the world is subject to “cyclical pole shifts”.

It claims civilization is wiped away every 7,000 years by this cataclysmic event, which has been foreseen by figures throughout history – including Jesus.

He claims Jesus is not the prophetic figure we now him as in the Bible, but instead a scholar who trained in India.

And it writes that Jesus had predicted a coming disaster and attempting to prepare people for the end times – with the last cataclysm being Noah’s Flood.

Thomas claims to have translated Jesus’s dying words on the cross, claiming he was actually speaking in the language he learned in India – in which he said “I am fainting, I am fainting, darkness is overcoming me”.

And he alleges on Easter Sunday when Jesus is said to have ascended to heaven, he was actually picked up by a “space vehicle”.

The book’s title – The Adam and Eve Story – comes from Thomas’s assessment that the Genesis story is actually a parable about the collapse of a previous civilization, in an extinction event before Noah’s Flood.

He claims there are “null zones” in the Milky Way our Solar System passes through every few thousand years, which cause cataclysmic changes to Earth as the poles shift.

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How the Increasing Belief in Extraterrestrials Inspires Our Real World

by D.W. Pasulka                  March 11, 2019                     (vice.com)

• It used to be that mainstream scientists such as Stephen Hawking would describe believers in UFOs and extraterrestrials as fringe “kranks”. But today, many respectable scientists not only believe in ET and UFOs, but claim to have been in communication with them, or have even had a close encounter. The article’s author, Diana Walsh Pasulka, has written a book entitled: American Cosmic: UFOs, Religion, Technology, which reveals how the increasing belief in nonhuman intelligence inspires our science and entertainment.

• Jacques Vallée is a computer scientist who has long been open to the reality of the extraterrestrial presence on and around the earth. He consulted on Steven Spielberg’s movie, Close Encounters of the Third Kind, and he paved the way for other Silicon Valley scientists and biotechnologists to draw from alien technology, using technology from alien spacecraft crash sites and information from mental downloads.

• Technology entrepreneur Rizwan Virk claims to have spoken with top researchers at Stanford, MIT, and Harvard who have actually seen alien “artifacts”. Virk also says that he accompanied several research scientists to an alien spaceship crash site in New Mexico, which was not the Roswell crash.

• Pasulka maintains that religions are social phenomena that emerge from their environments. Today’s digital environment (through films, phones, and computers) is producing new forms of religious beliefs which take for granted that extraterrestrials are in regular communication with humans on earth. The difference between these “religious” beliefs is that traditional religions require blind belief without real proof. The belief in extraterrestrial intelligence interacting with earth humans, however, is something that will be proven true.

• Until now, scientists and researchers have shied away from expressing their belief in an extraterrestrial presence, due to what Pasulka calls “the John Mack Effect.” Dr. John Mack was a Pulitzer Prize winning research psychiatrist working at Harvard University. In the 1990s Mack began a study of people who believed that they were in contact with extraterrestrial intelligence and found that they were not delusional, but were perfectly normal. Still, Harvard University questioned his motives in an internal investigation, and portrayed him as a ‘kook’. This produced a chilling effect related to the study of UFOs as scholars became unwilling to risk their reputations to study the phenomena.

• However, a recent presentation by Garry Nolan of Stanford University at the Harvard Medical School’s Consortium for Space Genetics, argued that the people who would be best equipped to explore space would be those whose brains were attuned to nontraditional forms of knowledge, and who have the ‘hyperintuition’ – the ability to know things beyond normal means, like a sixth sense. These are the types of people who should be chosen to investigate extraterrestrial destinations, says Nolan.

• For her book, Pasulka interviewed a biotechnologist named Thomas, who works in the field of cancer research. Thomas has introduced ‘implant technology’ to the field, using implant devices etched with a laser and coded so that human tissue recognizes and adapts to them. But he made a point not to reveal to his fellow scientists that he got the idea of an implant from alleged extraterrestrial technology. Says Thomas, “It would have been so far removed from their own belief systems that it would have been impossible for them to implement my vision. So, I keep that part secret.”

• The potential of almost unimaginable space infrastructures has created a new form of religion based on possible realism. Given the ways in which religious and spiritual beliefs develop, the emerging connection between Silicon Valley technopreneurs and alien technology is not surprising. As Vallée said, ‘the apparent absurdity of the claims does not mean they are not true’.

 

I first met Thomas* through a mutual friend. By most societal standards, Thomas would be considered “normal”—he’s a successful biotechnologist with a partner and kid, he enjoys long walks on the weekend and eating out. In his work, he helps create technologies that help people recover from illnesses, such as cancer. But the inspiration for some of Thomas’s most successful technologies—such as implant devices that are etched with a laser and coded so that human tissue recognizes them as itself, and not a foreign agent, or the use of an ancient stem cell that appears to help alleviate pain associated with cancer—is not something he openly shares. Why? Because, he explained to me, the implants were inspired by “nonhuman intelligence.” In other words, it wasn’t his own brilliant idea, nor was it another human’s. He believes that it came from a supernatural source, perhaps extraterrestrial.

His research protocol was, to be blunt, not transparent. He never told any of the scientists he recruited to his team where he acquired the idea for the new technology, because, according to Thomas, “First, they would have thought I was really weird, and second—and most importantly—it would have prevented them from being successful in implementing the necessary steps to create the technology. It would have been so far removed from their own belief systems that it would have been impossible for them to implement my vision. So, I keep that part secret.”

     Diana Walsh Pasulka

It has long been the case that people who believe in UFOs or extraterrestrials are characterized, as Stephen Hawking has described them, as “cranks” or fringe dwellers. Despite that association, some of the world’s brilliant, Nobel Prize–winning minds, among them the mathematician John Nash and the biochemist Kary Mullis, have had experiences they perceive to be close encounters. The University of Oxford’s Richard Dawkins, famous for his advocacy of Darwin’s theory of evolution as well as his disbelief in God and religions, nonetheless has suggested that human civilization may have been seeded by an alien civilization.

More strikingly, according to research by psychologists, belief in extraterrestrials is increasing in unprecedented ways. I myself found this to be the case, especially among contemporary technopreneurs (entrepreneurs who use technology to make an innovation or fill a need), just like Thomas. A belief that was once on the fringe now appears to be the new black. Spending a day with high-functioning believers—as I have done several times in the past few months as research for my book American Cosmic: UFOs, Religion, Technology—reveals a lot about how the increasing belief in nonhuman intelligence inspires our real world as well as our entertainment.

                 Riz Virk

Perhaps the first technopreneur who has long been “out” concerning his belief in UFOs is Jacques Vallée, who worked on ARPANET (the proto-internet), a program funded by the military. In fact, he was working on this new technology while experimenting with telepathic phenomena, what some would call “woo-woo” science. Vallée was so well known for his study of UFOs that Steven Spielberg asked him to consult on the set of Close Encounters of the Third Kind (the French scientist played by François Truffaut in the movie is based on Vallée). He was one of the first vocal technologists to advocate for the study of UFOs, and he paved the way for a slew of other Silicon Valley scientists and biotechnologists who believe that the secret to their success is alien technology—in other words, artifacts found at alleged alien spacecraft crash sites or information provided to them through mental downloads.

                            Garry Nolan

The gaming expert, technologist, and investor Rizwan Virk confirms this new direction in the belief and practices associated with UFOs. In an article on the website Hacker Noon, he wrote, “I can say that I have personally spoken to researchers from top universities (Stanford, MIT, Harvard) who have seen the “artifacts” that the article references, and other similar ones that are even more secretive (and perhaps more functional).” In my own research, I have also met scientists who believe in these artifacts; I’ve even accompanied several of them on an expedition to an alleged alien crash site in New Mexico, which, I was told, was “not Roswell.” But I couldn’t tell you where, exactly, we were, as I was blindfolded so I wouldn’t be able to identify the location.

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UNCW Professor Explores UFOs

by Ben Steelman                 March 8, 2019                   (newbernsj.com)

• In her book, “American Cosmic”, professor Diana Pasulka, chair of the department of philosophy and religion at the University of North Carolina Wilmington, notes the similarities between people’s belief in extraterrestrial beings and starships, and people who believe in organized religion.

• For six years, Pasulka has focused on a small group of respectable academic scientists and researchers who believe that UFOs are real, ET beings have been in contact with us, and that the government knows much more than it’s telling. While many of these scientists remain anonymous, Pasulka was able to interview some including Jacques Vallee, the former NASA scientist and co-founder of ARPANET, an ancestor of the modern Internet.

• Several of the scientists Pasulka interviewed claim to have had non-verbal communication with alien beings. In some cases, the scientists believe the beings fed them inspirations or ideas for new innovations. For Pasulka, these descriptions sound a lot like traditional descriptions of divine inspiration or the Voice of God. She specifically notes the calling of Samuel in the Old Testament.

• ET believers’ often traffic in “artifacts” from UFO crashes which seem to possess uncanny powers. This reminds Pasulka of the medieval obsession with saints’ relics or with splinters from the True Cross.

• Descriptions of modern UFO encounters often involving loud humming, thunder, dancing lights and appearances of luminous beings — eerily similar to accounts of the miracles in Fatima, Portugal, in 1917.

• Pasulka notes a sharp disconnect between the believers who see the alien intelligences as mostly benign, and modern media which prefers scary stories like “Independence Day” or “Signs.”

• Again and again, she finds parallels between Catholic miracles and UFO beliefs. Ultimately, Pasulka sees both quests as a search for answers to unknowable mysteries and for guidance to who we are and where we are going.

[Editor’s Note]   Upon noting the similarities between ancient religions and modern UFO experiences, it isn’t such a great leap to speculate that these ancient religious accounts are actually descriptions of early human civilizations’ encounters with UFOs and extraterrestrial beings thousands of years ago, and they simply formed a religion around the experiences.

 

Depending on which poll you choose, between one-third and nearly half of Americans believe in unidentified flying objects, intelligent beings from other planets and those beings coming to visit (and, occasionally, probe) us.
The famed psychologist Carl Jung referred to UFOs as “a modern myth of things unseen.” For Jung, the question wasn’t so much whether UFOs exist or what they are as why we believe in them.

Diana Pasulka, a professor who chairs the department of philosophy and religion at the University of North Carolina Wilmington, takes much the same view in “American Cosmic.” For her, belief in starships and little green men proves remarkably similar to belief in organized (or disorganized) religion. At times, the two might be almost interchangeable.

            Diana Pasulka

Lots of “new” religions and cults place faith in UFOs, from Heaven’s Gate and Unarians to the Church of Scientologyand the Nation of Islam. A study of one such cult in the 1950s led psychologist Leon Festinger and colleagues to the theory of cognitive dissonance, how true believers adjust their worldviews when prophecy fails.

These, however, aren’t Pasulka’s real concern. For six years, she focused on a small tribe of academic scientists, published researchers with respectable records, who nevertheless believe UFOs are real, the government knows much more than it’s telling and non-human intelligences behind these craft have already contacted some of us.

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