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Alien Lifeforms Will Be Discovered Within 20 Years, British Scientist Predicts

by Jasper Hamill                         November 19, 2018                         (metro.co.uk)

• Dr. David L Clements, a top astrophysicist at Imperial University (Imperial College London) as recently published a paper claiming that alien life will be discovered within 20 years. “…[N]ew observational insights and other developments mean that signs of life elsewhere might realistically be uncovered in the next decade or two,” says Clements.

• In his study, Dr. Clements discussed the Fermi Paradox, saying that an alien space-faring civilization, “…should thus already be here, and yet they are not.” “This can be used as an argument against the existence of intelligent extraterrestrials, but our own existence is proof that intelligent life can and does arise in the Galaxy. This is the central puzzle of the Fermi Paradox.”

• Dr. Clements’ paper goes on to suggest that life is likely to be found in oceans locked beneath the frozen surface of moons or planets. In our own solar system, one of the most likely homes for alien life is Europa, a moon of Jupiter which is believed to be hiding a gigantic body of water beneath its icy crust. “We are left with the rather chilling prospect that the galaxy may be filled with life, but that any intelligence within it is locked away beneath impenetrable ice barriers, unable to communicate with, or even comprehend the existence of, the universe outside,” says Dr. Clements.

[Editor’s Note]  Perhaps the true error is in the assumption that alien beings should already be here, “yet they are not”. Oh, they’re here alright, and in a variety and numbers that will astound the intentionally uninformed citizens of planet Earth. They will reveal themselves when it serves their purpose. The question is, is the reason that they are here one that is negative or positive for the human race?

 

In a newly published paper, one of the nation’s top astrophysicists has claimed we will discover traces of alien life within 20 years. Dr David L Clements of Imperial University said that ‘detecting signs of life elsewhere has been so technically challenging as to seem almost impossible’ until very recently. ‘However, new observational insights and other developments mean that signs of life elsewhere might realistically be uncovered in the next decade or two,’ he continued.

    Dr. David L Clements

In his study, Dr Clements discussed the Fermi Paradox, which is the contradiction between the high probability of life existing in the universe and the fact we haven’t managed to detect it. Theoretically, a ‘space-faring civilisation’ should be able to visit every single star in the galaxy in a timescale of between 50 and 100 million years – even if they travelled at velocities which were slower than the speed of light. ‘Aliens should thus already be here, and yet they are not,’ Dr Clements added. ‘This can be used as an argument against the existence of intelligent extraterrestrials, but our own existence is proof that intelligent life can and does arise in the Galaxy. ‘This is the central puzzle of the Fermi Paradox.’

His paper goes on to suggest that life is likely to be found in oceans locked beneath the frozen surface of moons or planets – which could have big implications for the development of a civilisation. In our own solar system, one of the most likely homes for alien life is Europa, a moon of Jupiter which is believed to be hiding a gigantic body of water beneath its icy crust. ‘We are left with the rather chilling prospect that the galaxy may be filled with life, but that any intelligence within it is locked away beneath impenetrable ice barriers, unable to communicate with, or even comprehend the existence of, the universe outside,’ the paper continued. ‘We know that species that live in water can evolve to a high level of intelligence – dolphins and octopuses are good examples. ‘However, A liquid environment may be a limiting factor in the development of technology.’

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Strange Twinkling Star Detected

Space                  November 18, 2018                    (earth-chronicles.com)

• Astronomers have discovered a strange flickering star, resembling a Tabby star, in which case an alien mega-structure was supposed to be present, like a Dyson sphere. (see previous ExoNews article on the Tabby Star)

• The behavior of the new star is not associated with aliens. However, astronomer Roberto Saito of the Federal University of Santa Catarina in Florianópolis, Brazil, argues that it is extremely unusual. “We don’t know what the object is,” says Saito. “And this is interesting.”

• Saito and his colleagues were looking for supernovae and found a star flashing brightly. Then the star suddenly faded. From 2010 to 2018, the brightness of the star either increased, then decreased, without any regularity, reminiscent of Tabbi’s star. The team named the object VVV-WIT-07 (WIT is an abbreviation of “What is this?”).

• A team of astronomers intend to continue observing the star using larger telescopes like the 8.1-meter Gemini or ALMA telescope located in Chile.

[Editor’s Note] Tabby’s Star is named after Tabetha Boyajian, the Louisana State University astrophysicist who discovered it on 2015. The stars luminosity changes, leading to speculation that it may be surrounded by anything from space debris to an alien-made Dyson sphere megastructure surrounding the star and harvesting its energy for space travel, manufacturing or other energy-consuming activities.

 

Astronomers who looked for supernovae, found an object that behaves more amazing than the star Tabbi.

Astronomers have discovered a strange flickering star, resembling a Tabby star, in which case an alien mega-structure was supposed to be present, like a Dyson sphere.

The idea of a megastructure, first proposed in 2015, was later refuted by data suggesting that the strange flickering is due to dust particles obscuring the star’s light. The behavior of the new star, it seems, is also not associated with aliens. However, astronomer Roberto Saito of the Federal University of Santa Catarina in Florianópolis, Brazil, argues that it is extremely unusual. Together with his colleagues, the scientist wrote an article about it, published in the arXiv.org preprint database.

“We don’t know what the object is,” says Saito. “And this is interesting.”

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44 Years After Its First Message to Aliens, Arecibo Observatory Calls For Follow-Up

by Alan Boyle                     November 16, 2018                         (geekwire.com)

• In 1974, the first Arecibo Message transmitted from the Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico was designed by SETI astronomers including Frank Drake and Carl Sagen and was beamed by radio transmission from the Arecibo telescope in the direction of the M13 star cluster in the constellation Hercules. It was meant as an intergalactic greeting from planet Earth.  (see image of message below)

• The shapes shown on the Arecibo Message grid represent a variety of concepts ranging from the numbers 1 through 10 to the chemical constituents of DNA, our solar system’s planets and the telescope itself, plus a stick figure that stands for humanity. Other types of messages have been sent out periodically since then as well.

• Since the first transmission was sent in 1974, the three minutes’ worth of radio waves have rippled out to a distance of 44 light-years, or less than 0.2 percent of the way to M13 star cluster. Experts acknowledge that it’s extremely unlikely the message will ever be detected and decoded by an alien civilization.

• Now the Planetary Habitability Laboratory at the University of Puerto Rico at Arecibo Observatory wants to transmit a second Arecibo Message from Arecibo’s 1,000-foot-wide radio telescope. They’ve announced a student-focused competition to design a new message to beam to extraterrestrials. In order to qualify and ultimately register, student competitors will first need to solve a series of brain-teasing puzzles posted on Arecibo’s website. The contest is open to teams from around the world, in classes ranging from kindergarten to college. Each team should consist of five students plus an adult mentor – for example, a teacher, professor or professional scientist. The first challenge will be posted on December 16th. Clues and follow-up activities will be rolled out periodically over the next year, and the winning team is due to be revealed next fall during a celebration of the Arecibo Message’s 45th anniversary.  (see 1:08 minute video below)

• Experts continue to debate the wisdom of broadcasting our existence to the rest of the universe. Most famously, the late physicist Stephen Hawking said letting extraterrestrials know where we are could turn out as badly for us as Christopher Columbus’ arrival in the New World turned out for Native Americans.

 

The Arecibo Observatory today kicked off a student-focused competition to design a new message to beam to extraterrestrials, 44 years to the day since the first deliberate message was sent out from Arecibo’s 1,000-foot-wide radio telescope.

“Our society and our technology have changed a lot since 1974,” Francisco Cordova, the observatory’s director, said in a news release. “So if we were assembling our message today, what would it say? What would it look like? What one would need to learn to be able to design the right updated message from the earthlings? Those are the questions we are posing to young people around the world through the New Arecibo Message – the global challenge.”

 The Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico

It’s not just about the message, however: Competitors will have to solve brain-teasing puzzles posted on Arecibo’s website in order to qualify, get instructions, register and submit their designs. Along the way, they’ll learn about space science, the scientific method and Arecibo’s story.

“We have quite a few surprises in store for participants, and we will be sharing more details as the competition progresses,” Cordova said.

The contest is open to teams from around the world, in classes ranging from kindergarten to college. Each team should consist of five students plus an adult mentor – for example, a teacher, professor or professional scientist. The first challenge will be posted on Dec. 16.

The 1st Arecibo Message

“Teams should wait until the release of the first challenge on December 16, since they will need to solve that challenge to be able to register,” Abel Méndez, director of the Planetary Habitability Laboratory at the University of Puerto Rico at Arecibo, told me in an email. “Meanwhile, team leaders should subscribe to the Arecibo newsletter for updates and start forming their own teams.”

Clues and follow-up activities will be rolled out periodically over the next year, and the winning team is due to be revealed next fall during a celebration of the Arecibo Message’s 45th anniversary.

 

1:08 minute video on the 1974 Arecibo Message

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