Tag: U.S. Navy

Scientific Community Making Search For UFOs Mainstream

May 17, 2019            (newyork.cbslocal.com)

• Christopher Deperno and Sam Falvo investigate unidentified flying objects for the New York chapter of the Mutual UFO Network, a global organization established in 1969. Author and researcher Linda Zimmermann has investigated some 500 eyewitness accounts of UFO’s in the Hudson Valley NY area. Zimmermann and Falvo’s organizations have now formed a joint venture called Project Aries – with the goal of collecting as much data as possible on Hudson Valley UFO sightings.

• “We do know that the phenomenon is real,” said Falvo. “Military pilots, army personnel… the U.S. Navy now… all of them have reported different types of sightings,” added Deperno. Even NASA is conceding it’s possible the universe contains different life forms. Experts say the race is heating up to find answers as to who they are, where they’re from, and what they may want from us.

• What has long been considered a fringe field of science, the search for answers about extraterrestrials and UFOs has gone mainstream. Prestigious universities including Harvard and Penn State are dedicating some of their brightest minds to this as a new field of study. “We believe the search for extraterrestrial intelligence needs a permanent academic home,” said Penn State’s Jason Wright. In the private sector, there is funding everything from digital, interstellar communication, to a dish that emits radio waves.

• Why has the Hudson Valley of New York state become such a UFO hot spot? “There is the possibility that they are drawn to the water here… the rivers, the lakes, and reservoirs, but also this area has a very unique magnetic field and gravitational field,” Zimmermann said.  (see 2:20 minute video from CBS New York on the UFOs in the Hudson Valley)

 

NEW YORK (CBS NewYork) – The search for extraterrestrial activity is getting some credibility.

Notable scientists are getting behind a push to make contact with whatever might be out there.

“It was between a half mile and a mile away… it was big and quiet… moving very slowly,” UFO witness Robert Strong said.

Did the Hudson Valley resident really see a UFO?

“Military pilots, army personnel… the U.S. Navy now… all of them have reported different types of sightings,” Christopher Deperno of MUFON said.

Even NASA is conceding it’s possible the universe contains different life forms.

        Linda Zimmerman

“We do know that the phenomenon is real,” Sam Falvo of MUFON added.

Experts say the race is heating up to find answers as to who they are, where they’re from, and what they may want from us.

Deperno and Falvo investigate unidentified flying objects for the New York chapter of the Mutual UFO Network, a global organization established in 1969.

“Most of them… 95 percent or so can be identified… it’s those five or six percent that really stir your interest,” Falvo said.

What they do has long been considered a fringe field of science, but today, this search for answers has gone mainstream. Prestigious universities including Harvard and Penn State are dedicating some of their brightest minds to this as a new field of study.

2:20 minute video from CBS New York on the UFOs in the Hudson Valley

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Letter: No Weather Balloon

May 9, 2019                       (pilotonline.com)

[Editor’s Note]    This is a Letter to the Editor from the Virginian-Pilot, the local newspaper for the Norfolk/Virginia Beach region, from May 9th.

Re: “Navy to take UFO sightings seriously” (front page, April 26): I was so pleased to see that the U.S. Navy has decided that UFOs do exist and they will be investigating the sightings.

In May 1968, while serving in the U.S. Coast Guard, I encountered an object in Atlantic Beach, N.C. I was within 50 to 70 feet of the object when it landed and actually seemed to welcome my interest. It made no noise, no thrust, no nothing. It moved around like a laser dot on a screen, an approximately 24-inch-diameter ball of light but left a much larger imprint on the ground. The encounter lasted maybe 15 minutes.

There were four others who witnessed this event. They wanted to report the event, but I refused. I didn’t want to be labeled as some sort of nut. However, the next day I was summoned to a meeting with a Marine Corps captain from Cherry Point Marine Corps Air Station. He stated he was representing the Air Force’s Blue Book investigation and asked if I wanted to report a UFO. I said to him, “I’m reporting either God, an angel or a UFO, something that flies that we don’t have.” He said I had seen a weather balloon and to return to my duties.

It was no balloon. Ladies and gentlemen, there is something more powerful and knowledgeable than the United State, Russia, China, North Korea and the world combined.

Reginald E. Stubbs, Jr.

Chincoteague Island

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Navy: No Release of UFO Information to the General Public Expected

by Paul Sonne                  May 1, 2019                   (washingtonpost.com)

• In recent news, it was revealed that the U.S. Navy has drafted a procedure to investigate and catalogue reports of unidentified flying objects coming in from its pilots. (see article on new Navy UFO guidelines here) But the service doesn’t expect to make the information public, citing privileged and classified reporting that is typically included in such files.

• Joe Gradisher, a spokesman for the office of the Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Information Warfare, said in a statement that the Navy expects to keep the information it gathers private for a number of reasons. “Military aviation safety organizations always retain reporting of hazards to aviation as privileged information in order to preserve the free and honest prioritization and discussion of safety among aircrew,” Gradisher said. “Furthermore, any report generated as a result of these investigations will, by necessity, include classified information on military operations.” “Therefore, no release of information to the general public is expected.”

• The Navy’s new UFO reporting guidelines follow the revelation that in late 2017 the Pentagon ran a secret, 5-year, $22M “UFO” office to collect and analyze “anomalous aerospace threats”. It was known as the Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program. The program resulted in the release of video footage from the cockpit cameras of Navy aircraft, which appeared to document oval-shaped vessels that resemble flying Tic Tacs. (see NY Times article from Dec 2017 here)

• Reports of curious sightings from military aircraft aren’t new. During World War II, Allied military pilots witnessed unexplained objects and fireballs that they dubbed “foo fighters”. A number of official government investigations looked into such phenomena during the postwar period.

• Even though the Navy has indicated it has no plans to release any UFO data, unclassified portions of the information or broad overviews of the findings could come out, according to Luis Elizondo, an intelligence officer who ran AATIP before leaving the Pentagon. “If it remains strictly within classified channels, then the ‘right person’ may not actually get the information. The right person doesn’t necessarily mean a military leader. It can be a lawmaker. It can be a whole host of different individuals,” Elizondo said. Even if the information isn’t made available to the public, it could be reported to Congress.

 

The U.S. Navy has drafted a procedure to investigate and catalogue reports of unidentified flying objects coming in from its pilots. But the service doesn’t expect to make the information public, citing privileged and classified reporting that is typically included in such files.

Joe Gradisher, a spokesman for the office of the Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Information Warfare, said in a statement that the Navy expects to keep the information it gathers private for a number of reasons.

“Military aviation safety organizations always retain reporting of hazards to aviation as privileged information in order to preserve the free and honest prioritization and discussion of safety among aircrew,” Gradisher said. “Furthermore, any report generated as a result of these investigations will, by necessity, include classified information on military operations.”

He added, “Therefore, no release of information to the general public is expected.”

The Navy’s recent decision to draft formal guidelines for pilots to document encounters with unexplained aerial phenomena comes after the revelation in late 2017 that the Pentagon ran a secret “UFO” office that spent $22 million over five years to collect and analyze “anomalous aerospace threats.” Funding for the office, known as the Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program, or AATIP, officially ended in 2012, though operations continued.

Among other things, the program resulted in the release of footage from the cockpit cameras of military aircraft, which appeared to document oval-shaped vessels that resemble flying Tic Tacs.

Reports of curious sightings from military aircraft aren’t new. During World War II, Allied military pilots witnessed unexplained objects and fireballs that they dubbed “foo fighters”— a term that later inspired the name of the eponymous 1990s rock band. A number of official government investigations looked into such phenomena in the postwar period.

Now, the Navy has agreed to a more formalized process for cataloguing and investigating reports from pilots, a decision welcomed by former U.S. officials who want the military to take the matter seriously and remove the stigma in the armed forces of reporting such incidents.

Even though the Navy indicated it has no plans in the imminent future to release the data, unclassified portions of the information or broad overviews of the findings could come out, according to Luis Elizondo, an intelligence officer who ran AATIP before leaving the Pentagon.

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