Tag: Susan Gough

The Pentagon Has No Intention of Sharing UFO Information

Article by Jazz Shaw                                  September 10, 2020                                         (hotair.com)

• All of the UFO/UAP (‘Unidentified Aerial Phenomena’) news this summer created a considerable excitement in the air. Florida Senator Marco Rubio made an unprecedented request for a report from the Pentagon’s UAP Task Force. Most people, civilians and government officials alike, didn’t even know we HAD a UFO task force. Then the Pentagon came out and officially announced the ‘formation’ of the task force. Then the NY Times published an article alluding to additional programs and an acknowledgment of a government “crash retrieval program” that could be in possession of “off-world materials”. Heady stuff.

• Journalist Roger Glassel contacted Pentagon UAP spokesperson Susan Gough with some specific questions about the new task force. Ms. Gough provided answers in a professional fashion, but seemingly doused most hopes for some new era of government transparency on the subject.

• Question: Will the public be informed about any findings from the UAPTF of the nature and/or origins of Unidentified Aerial Phenomena?   Answer: “[T]o avoid disclosing information that may be useful to our adversaries, DOD does not discuss publicly the details of either the observations or the examination of reported incursions into our training ranges or designated airspace, including those incursions initially designated as UAP.” (ie: “No.”)

• Question: Will the newly established UAP Task Force look into other aspects of the nature and origins of Unidentified Aerial Phenomena, or will the UAPTF just look at the aspect of UAP being a potential threat to U.S. national security?   Answer: “The Department of Defense established the [task force] to improve its understanding of, and gain insight into, the nature and origins of UAP incursions into our training ranges and designated airspace. The mission of the task force is to detect, analyze and catalog UAP incursions that could potentially pose a threat to U.S. national security. (ie: Pentagon is sticking to its position that they have no curiosity as to what these things are or where they came from, and are solely focusing on the potential national security threat, severely limiting the scope of what might be examined.)

• To summarize, the Pentagon’s UFO task force will take reports about UAP encounters if they might constitute a threat to national security and they promise to do a better job collecting and correlating such reports. But they won’t be releasing any of it for public consumption. The same goes for the Senate Intelligence Committee and the report the “requested”. That committee request may not even make it to the House bill, much less law. Furthermore, Congress hasn’t tied the request to any funding, so the DoD is under no obligation to comply. They can simply thank Congress for their input and proceed to ignore them, just as Ms Gough evaded the journalist’s questions.

• If there’s going to be any serious UFO disclosure it’s going to be up to the private sector and organizations such as Tom DeLonge’s ‘To The Stars Academy’, or whistleblowers like Luis Elizondo, or some high-ranking deathbed confessions – which the Pentagon can deny or obfuscate.

 

                 Roger Glassel

Some disappointing news on the UFO front came out this week, likely dampening the hopes of many people in the ufology community who have been eagerly looking forward to some sort of forthcoming disclosure from the government on this subject. As regular readers are already aware, there was considerable excitement in the air this summer following a number of revelations and surprising announcements on the topic of Unidentified Aerial Phenomena (UAPs). First we saw a request from the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, led by Marco Rubio, for a public report from the Pentagon’s UAP Task Force. This came as quite a surprise to people, including many in the government, who didn’t even know that we had a UAP Task Force.

           Susan Gough

That was followed by an official announcement of the formation of the task force by the Pentagon. After that, major newspapers such as the New York Times began digging into the subject, even raising the prospect of the potential disclosure of additional programs that might even include an acknowledgment of a government “crash retrieval program” that could be in possession of “off-world materials.

This led journalists in the ufology field to press the Pentagon for additional details. One such person was investigative journalist Roger Glassel, who contacted Pentagon UAP spokesperson Susan Gough with a number of specific questions about the new task force and its anticipated activities as they proceed to compile existing information on UAP encounters by the military and create channels for the collection of future reports. I first saw the article teased on Twitter.

The answers Roger received give us the disappointing news I alluded to above. Ms. Gough (which is pronounced “Goff,” by the way, as I only learned from her this week) provided Glassel with answers in a professional fashion, but seemingly doused most hopes for some new era of government transparency on the subject. Here are two of the key questions that produced bad news.

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Leaked Documents Show Pentagon Studied UFO-Related Phenomena

 

Article by MJ Banias                          February 14, 2020                           (vice.com)

• In 2017, The New York Times revealed the existence of $22 million dollar UFO investigation program called the Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program, or AATIP. Two months ago, however, a Pentagon spokesperson said that AATIP had nothing to do with UFOs. Now, newly leaked documents acquired by Popular Mechanics from Bigelow Aerospace (BAASS) show that the Department of Defense program did indeed concern UFOs.

• One BAASS report that appeared on an AATIP list investigated injuries sustained by people who experienced “exposure to anomalous vehicles.” The report mentions UFOs several times. However, the report’s author, Christopher “Kit” Green, told Popular Mechanics that the report does not refer to any non-human extraterrestrial technology.

• Another BAASS report from 2009 explored a vast assortment of strange phenomena including “physical effects” of unknown aerial phenomena (UAP); the “biological effects” of UAP encounters on biological organisms; a request for documents from the Air Force’s UFO investigation program, Project Blue Book; the mention of several UAP incidents, including violations of restricted airspace near a nuclear weapons facility; and that Utah’s infamous Skinwalker Ranch is a “possible laboratory for studying other intelligences and possible interdimensional phenomena.”

• Last month, the DoD spokesperson also stated that Luis Elizondo, who claimed to have run the AATIP program for the Pentagon, was not involved in AATIP. But an unpublished document received by Popular Mechanics alludes to his responsibilities under AATIP without mentioning Elizondo by name. Elizondo called this “vindication,” adding, “the truth always prevails.” Elizondo maintains that the Pentagon is still investigating sightings of and encounters with UAP under a different program.

• Pentagon spokesperson Susan Gough told VICE/Motherboard that the Pentagon will release a new public statement in the following weeks concerning the AATIP program, and Elizondo’s role in it.

 

        Luis Elizondo

Newly leaked documents show that the Department of Defense funded a study concerning UFOs, contradicting recent statements by the Pentagon.

In 2017, The New York Times revealed the existence of $22 million dollar UFO investigation program called the Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program, or AATIP. A twist came two months ago, however, when Pentagon spokesperson Susan Gough told John Greenewald—curator of the Black Vault, the largest civilian archive of declassified government documents—that AATIP had nothing to do with UFOs. Greenewald also wrote that the Pentagon told him that another program, the Advanced Aerospace Weapons System Application Program or AAWSAP, was the name of the contract that the government gave out to produce reports under AATIP.

In a new Popular Mechanics article, journalist Tim McMillan acquired documents from Bigelow Aerospace’s exotic science division, Bigelow Aerospace Advanced Space Studies, or BAASS, indicating that the organization did explore strange phenomena under the auspices of the AATIP program.

One BAASS report, leaked to McMillan by an unnamed source, previously appeared on a list of products produced under the AATIP contract “for DIA to publish” that was obtained via FOIA laws. The report was cited incorrectly on that list, but Popular Mechanics tracked down its author, who confirmed its authenticity. The report investigated “exotic” propulsion via injuries sustained by people who experienced “exposure to anomalous vehicles.” The text mentions UFOs several times.

“What can not be overly emphasized, is that when one looks at the literature of anomalous cases, including UFO claims from the most reliable sources, the extent and degree of acute high but not necessarily chronic low-level injuries are consistent across patients who are injured, compared to witnesses in the far-field, who are not,” the report states.

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Luis Elizondo Opens Up On Why the Pentagon Keeps Changing Its Story on AATIP and UFOs

 

Article by Jazz Shaw                       January 13, 2020                        (hotair.com)

• Since we first learned of the (Pentagon’s $22 million) ‘Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program’ (AATIP), we’ve been told that it was a Department of Defense study of UAPs/UFOs, which Luis Elizondo ran before leaving the Pentagon to join the ‘To The Stars Academy of Arts and Sciences’. Both Elizondo and Harry Reid, the former Nevada Senator who initiated the Pentagon program, have gone on record confirming the UFO program and Elizondo’s role in it.

• Then more recently, DoD spokesperson Susan Gough backtracked saying that Elizondo was not involved with AATIP. Even stranger, Elizondo didn’t come forward to defend his statements. Said Elizondo, “There are elements in the Pentagon that are seriously upset with me for me ‘breaking rank’ in their eyes.” “I think (this disinformation is) a vendetta by a few in the Pentagon. But I think we will all know the real reason this year.”

• In a recent interview with John Greenewald of The Black Vault, Elizondo broke his silence stating, “As the senior ranking person in the AATIP program, I was ultimately responsible for ensuring the efficient and effective operations …performed by the outstanding men and women we had working in the program. My job was primarily to fend off the distractions so the rest of the team could do their job. …This includes fighting for resources, support, and personnel.”

• So why would Susan Gough keep insisting Elizondo wasn’t involved? Was the Pentagon deliberately and knowingly lying about Elizondo? Or was it a case of the DoD having lost the accurate records, as Gough has said? Elizondo suggests that this may have been a case where some in the Pentagon made “a deliberate attempt to confuse, hide, and conceal the truth.” Given the Pentagon’s casual relationship with the truth on this subject, that’s not so tough to believe.

• Toward the end of the interview, Elizondo refers to the recent admission from the Navy that there is at least one more, longer video of the tic-tac UFO encounter – something the Pentagon has repeatedly denied. “I am happy with the fact that recently some Navy former senior officials have come out and admitted there were more videos (of) greater length,” said Elizondo. “Also the Navy’s admission about the reality of UAPs and the fact they are creating new (UAP reporting) policies. … (This) is definitely a step in the right direction. I am not sure I can take credit for it but I like to think I played a small part in it.” “[I]t makes me feel a little vindicated.”

• Elizondo is still under an Non-Disclosure Agreement and doesn’t want to lose his security clearance, so he can’t say more. But perhaps he’s let something slip here. When referencing the “thousands of documents” related to the AATIP program that haven’t been cleared for release, he mentions “videos”… plural. There could be many UAP videos in the Navy’s possession from other incidents, but no one has filed a FOIA request for them. Still, Elizondo is confident that we will see a major disclosure of UAPs/UFOs by the Department of Defense this year.

 

One of the repeating themes we’ve run across in our coverage of the ongoing story of the Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program (AATIP)

       John Greenewald

and the search for information about UFOs/UAP is the disconnect between what the To The Stars Academy of Arts and Sciences (TTSA) has said about Luis Elizondo and what the Pentagon has had to say about him. If you ask TTSA, Harry Reid (who requested the program initially) or Elizondo himself, he ran the program. If you run the question by the Pentagon, specifically spokesperson Susan Gough, Elizondo had “no assigned duties” in the Defense Intelligence Agency and was not involved with AATIP.

          Susan Gough

So what’s with that disconnect? It’s a question I asked early on when researching this subject and never found a convincing answer. And the fact that Elizondo himself never seemed to come forward to defend his statements made it seem all the more strange. But now he’s broken his silence. In an interview with John Greenewald at The Black Vault, Elizondo tackles that question and many others. There’s no new documentation coming out of this interview (at least not yet) but at least we get to hear his side of the story. I’m going to include a couple of the more interesting snippets from the interview here, but if you have any interest in the subject I would suggest you click through and read the entire thing for yourself.

First of all, what does Elizondo say his role in AATIP was?

“As the senior ranking person in the AATIP program, I was ultimately responsible for ensuring the efficient and effective operations of the overall effort. However, in fairness, the lion’s work was performed by the outstanding men and women we had working in the program. My job was primarily to fend off the distractions so the rest of the team could do their job. In essence, my job was to catch the proverbial bullets so our folks could do their job without distraction. Not an unusual role for the senior person in any program to assume. This includes fighting for resources, support, and personnel.”

So if that’s the case, how does the Pentagon get the story so wrong? Why would Susan Gough keep insisting he wasn’t involved? Elizondo mentions that he’s kept quiet about this in the past primarily because he was threatened with having his security clearance taken away when he first came out with TTSA and he doesn’t want to lose it. But now he feels he needs to set the record straight.

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