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Tom DeLonge on Releasing UFO Videos: ‘I Can’t Believe We Pulled This Off’

Article by Patrick Doyle                              May 7, 2020                           (rollingstone.com)

• In late April, the US Department of Defense declassified three videos of UFOs taken by Navy jets – one over the Pacific Ocean off of San Diego in 2004, and two others over the Atlantic Ocean off of Florida and Virginia in 2015. These were the same videos that were published in December 2017 by the New York Times, and provided by ‘To the Stars Academy of Arts & Sciences’, a UFO research organization headed by rock guitarist Tom DeLonge (pictured above). And these are the same videos which the US Navy acknowledged in 2019 that they were indeed real and not fabricated.

• DeLonge sees this official government release as the culmination of a long journey that began when he walked away from his band, Blink-182, in 2015 to spend more time developing ‘To the Stars’ as a “transmedia” experience working with former intelligence officials to uncover information about unidentified aerial phenomena. DeLonge feels that the government acknowledged the videos because of the investigative work his team is doing. “I can’t believe we pulled this off,” he said. “It’s a big deal, and so much more is coming. I think people need to buckle up.”

• DeLonge was struck by how many people somehow missed the original release of the videos in 2017 or the Navy’s acknowledgment of them in 2019. At the time that the New York Times published the videos, they also revealed that until 2012, the Pentagon had a program to study UFOs as well. “I think it’s something we should all be focusing on right now, because it’s a big, big thing that’s gonna change the world as we know it,” said DeLonge.

• DeLonge points out that the government works for us, the people. There were leaks at the Pentagon, “… and basically we caught them dealing with something, and now they’re forced to recognize it and acknowledge it.” So the government is like, ‘Alright it’s time to start talking about it because Tom and his rascals are putting our feet to the fire,’ you know?”

• The Gimbal UFO video that was recorded by Navy jets from the USS Theodore Roosevelt carrier battle group off of Florida in 2015 is DeLonge’s favorite. * When he first saw the video, all he could say was, “’Oh my God, this is the real deal.’ I have never seen a UFO that clear before.” “[Y]ou can see the plasma on the bottom, you can see the blurry edges. You see all the things that are just absolutely impossible with any technology that we know of,” says DeLonge.

• “Steve Justice, who runs our aerospace division, was one of the top guys at Lockheed Martin Skunk Works,” said DeLonge. “Steve is looking at this going, ‘Wow, this is not something anyone can do on earth right now.’ But the scarier part could be if Russia or China or someone else did create something that could do that, that’s a big deal. It’s a game changer and we should be all over it. So either way, we need to focus on this.”

• When people say, “oh, it could be anything.” No. The definition is incredible with these Navy jet cameras. “[I]t literally is like taking a black and white photo with the exact amount of clarity,” says DeLonge. “That’s why the pilots were so animated. They knew that this was a special event.”

• When skeptics claim that the Navy’s UFO videos could be the result of “bugs in the imaging code” of the fighter jet video recorders, DeLonge points out that there wasn’t just video footage. There were trained observers who saw it. There was also radar data from the absolute top radar systems that have ever been invented. This is coupled with satellite data. There was a DoD investigation. “So we’re not saying, ‘Hey, this is an unidentified aerial object because one guy saw something.’ We’re saying it because it’s been captured on so many systems and been confirmed by so many different groups, so I think it’s a really big deal.” “For someone just to say it’s a bug or a glitch is literally pure ignorance,” says DeLonge. “[I]t just shows the close-mindedness of people that are supposed to be some of the smarter people here. It just blows my mind. I hold these guys up to a higher standard than that.”

• “To the Stars Academy made all the noise,” says DeLonge. “We’ve been working tirelessly to get all the senators and congressman briefed… (and making) sure the info is getting passed around. We’ve been giving advice on national security policy… and basically have all the data flow up to the proper think tanks.” “Now that the cat is out of the bag, …what you’re seeing is them having meetings and saying, ‘What are we going to do? Are we going to try to act like this isn’t real? I’m not going to be the guy… that has to get hauled before Congress and be deposed on CNN live.”

• Trump has “talked about the fact that he’s had a (Navy UFO) briefing,” DeLonge says. “I tend to wonder when he says things like, “I don’t particularly know if these are real or not.” “I don’t talk to the President. I just know that he got briefed…. I think whatever his reasons are for saying the things he’s saying are probably because behind the scenes, there’s a lot more discussions on how to best handle this with the public. So you know, I’m excited that he mentioned it again, because I think it helps.”

 

Last week, the Department of Defense released three declassified videos of “unexplained aerial phenomena.” The videos — filmed by Navy pilots in 2004 and 2015 — show “objects hurtling through the sky, one rotating against the wind, and pilots can be heard expressing confusion and awe,” wrote the New York Times, who published two of the videos in 2017 at the same time as To the Stars Academy of Arts & Sciences, a company that researches unidentified aerial phenomena co-founded by Tom DeLonge, the original singer-guitarist of Blink-182. A third video, of a 2015 incident off the East Coast, was released by To the Stars the following year. Though the Navy acknowledged that the videos were not fabricated in 2019, for people still in doubt, the Department of Defense officially released the videos last week and made them available for download “to clear up any misconceptions by the public.”

While the Pentagon did not offer any more hints on what we are looking at, DeLonge saw the official government acknowledgment as the culmination of a long journey — one that began when he walked away from his band in 2015 to spend more time developing To the Stars, a “transmedia” experience for music, books, films, and UFO research. DeLonge works alongside former intelligence officials to uncover information about unidentified aerial phenomena, and helped expose the Pentagon’s mysterious UFO program in 2017.

“It’s wild,” says DeLonge, who feels that the government released the statement because of the investigative work his team is doing. “I can’t believe we pulled this off. It’s a big deal, and so much more is coming. I think people need to buckle up.” We talked to DeLonge — whose History Channel show Unidentified is gearing up for its second season — about the UFO videos, his life in isolation, and the possibility of a reunion with Blink-182.

What was your reaction when the government officially released these videos?

My first reaction was how many people didn’t see when the Navy acknowledged the videos were real, the objects were real, and UFOs were real. That all happened a year ago. And then before that, the New York Times blasted out that UFOs were real and the Pentagon was studying them, so it’s funny that this came out now, with the Department of Defense, which is obviously higher than the Navy. It just shows you how much news is out there and how many people are out there, and how much work we have to do.

I did not see it coming, but I do know some of the inside leaks that are happening at the Pentagon. And they’re not allowed to lie, and basically we caught them dealing with something, and now they’re forced to recognize it and acknowledge it. They do work for us. They’re like, “Alright it’s time to start talking about it because Tom and his rascals are putting our feet to the fire,” you know? I think it’s something we should all be focusing on right now, because it’s a big, big thing that’s gonna change the world as we know it.

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FAIR USE NOTICE: This page contains copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. ExoNews.org distributes this material for the purpose of news reporting, educational research, comment and criticism, constituting Fair Use under 17 U.S.C § 107. Please contact the Editor at ExoNews with any copyright issue.

US Army Refuses to Release Records on Tom DeLonge’s UFO Organization

 

Article by MJ Banias                          March 13, 2020                             (vice.com)

• In October of 2019, the US Army’s Combat Capabilities Development Command, a department focused on military research and development, entered a five-year contract with Tom DeLonges’ ‘To The Stars Academy’ (TTSA) to further its “collection and evaluation of novel materials.” For years, TTSA has been actively collecting ‘materials from alleged exotic sources’, ie: UFO crash debris and materials. Army spokesperson Doug Halleaux explains that the Combat Capabilities Development Command is interested in developing exotic science such as active camouflage, inertial mass reduction, and quantum communication.

• Army Regulation 70-57 exempts it from Freedom of Information Act requests for declassified government documents. So John Greenewald of The Black Vault filed a FOIA Request for all records and emails related to Dr. Joseph Cannon of U.S. Army Futures Command containing keywords such as “TTSA” and “To The Stars.”

• The Army’s response to Greenewald was that they indeed found 29 documents relating to his request. But each and every page is exempt from FOIA. Halleaux said that these documents are exempt from public scrutiny because they pertain to “trade secrets and commercial or financial information [that are] privileged or confidential” including email communications. Halleaux also told Motherboard (Vice.com) that he personally had no idea what the Army and TTSA were up to, and that if he did, he still couldn’t talk about it.

• Halleaux told Motherboard that the government believes the “key technologies or capabilities that [the Army] is investigating with TTSA are certainly on the leading edge of the realm of the possible”. But will the general public see any benefit from this five-year Army-TTSA collaboration? TTSA’s Chief Operating Officer and former Lockheed Martin Skunkworks head, Steve Justice, said that built into the collaborative contract’s language, ‘one of TTSA’s prime objectives is public transparency and commercial applications’, and calls for a ‘two-way sharing of information’.

• Says Justice, “The benefit of the [contract agreement] is to gain access to otherwise inaccessible government laboratories and technical expertise to expose all attributes of unusual materials and share the results. If unusual attributes are found, TTSA may use that information to create applications for public benefit. We cannot speak for any actions the Army might take after studying the results.”

• Chief Content Officer Kari DeLonge (Tom’s sister) said that she could not comment on whether the company had their hands on truly alien materials, but added that, “we are steadfast and dedicated to responsible analysis and reporting without speculation.”

• Perhaps the real question is why would advanced space-faring extraterrestrials keep crashing and leaving their scrap in the deserts of Nevada and New Mexico? Are they leaving humanity technological breadcrumbs? Or are they just dumping their garbage on our planet?

 

The U.S. Army refused to release any records about its deal with Tom DeLonge’s UFO-hunting group To the Stars Academy (TTSA).

           John Greenewald
          of ‘The Black Vault’

In October of 2019, the former Blink-182 frontman’s UFO organization joined forces with the US Army’s Combat

                   TTSA’s Steve Justice

Capabilities Development Command, a research and development body. According to the contract, the government is interested in studying some pretty exotic science such as active camouflage, inertial mass reduction, and quantum communication. In particular, the government is interested in the group’s ADAM Project, which Doug Halleaux, a spokesperson for the U.S. Army Combat Capabilities Development Command Ground Vehicle Systems Center described as “a global dragnet for the collection and evaluation of novel materials.” In 2018, TTSA put out a call for individuals and organizations to submit materials from alleged exotic sources as part of the project.

John Greenewald of The Black Vault, a website dedicated to collecting declassified government documents, explained in a recent blog post that the research and reports related to the deal are exempt from Freedom of Information Act requests as per Army Regulation 70-57.

   Kari DeLonge

Knowing this, Greenewald instead filed a FOIA Request regarding a copy of all records and emails related to Dr. Joseph Cannon of U.S. Army Futures Command (who is working on the agreement) containing keywords such as “TTSA” and “To The Stars.”

The Army got back to Greenewald telling him that 29 documents were found relating to his request, and each page was exempt from his request. The Army stated that it was not going to release any records. Motherboard reached out to Halleaux, the Army’s CCDC spokesperson, who said that any documents related to DeLonge’s organization would be classified as “trade secrets and commercial or financial information [that are] privileged or confidential.”

In other words, the public can’t know what the Army and TTSA is working on because of corporate and commercial secrets, namely intellectual property and finances. This includes related email communications. Halleaux told Motherboard that he personally had no idea what the Army and TTSA were up to, and if he did, he couldn’t talk about it.

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FAIR USE NOTICE: This page contains copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. ExoNews.org distributes this material for the purpose of news reporting, educational research, comment and criticism, constituting Fair Use under 17 U.S.C § 107. Please contact the Editor at ExoNews with any copyright issue.

UFO Researcher Explains Why She Sold ‘Exotic Meta-Material’ to Tom DeLonge

Listen to “e174 UFO Researcher Explains Why She Sold ‘Exotic Meta-Material’ to Tom DeLonge” on Spreaker.

Article By MJ Banias                         November 14, 2019                         (vice.com)

• In October 2019, Tom DeLonge’s ‘To The Stars Academy’ entered into a partnership with the US Army to study an exotic ‘meta-material’. (See previous ExoArticle here) So where did this exotic material come from?

• In the summer of 1947, (just prior to the infamous Roswell crash of July 4, 1947) locals found a wedge-shaped craft that had crashed near the White Sands proving grounds in New Mexico where two dead aliens were discovered and one that was still alive. One local man yanked a piece of the metal off of the craft as a souvenir. The man gave the piece of metal to his grandson who became a sergeant in the US Army. In 1996, this anonymous sergeant turned the metal over to Art Bell, the late host of Coast to Coast AM, and investigative journalist and UFO researcher Linda Moulton Howe (pictured above).

• Moulton Howe took the piece of bismuth magnesium alloy to Carnegie Science’s Department of Technical Magnetism to have it assessed. The findings at the time were inconclusive. Then she took the metal sample to the chair of the Institute of Advanced Studies in Austin Texas, Dr. Hal Puthoff. Again, the tests were inconclusive. Puthoff did suggest that another test could be done with special instrumentation. It was hypothesized that if you blasted the metal with enough terahertz of magnetic field energy, it would cause it to float. Tom Delonge repeated this in a podcast interview with Joe Rogan.

• Moulton Howe allowed ‘To The Stars Academys’ scientists, including Puthoff, further attempts to test the metal without success. Then in July 2018, ‘To The Stars’ COO and former director of Lockheed Martin’s Skunkworks, Steve Justice gave Moulton Howe a phone call. Justice said that the US Army might be interested in studying the metals. The US Army Ground Vehicle Systems Center had a Materials Analysis and Electro-Magnetic Spectrum laboratory. The Army was interested in blasting the meta-material with magnetic fields to elicit a “demonstrable physical phenomena.” ‘To The Stars Academy’ would partner with the US Army, and they hoped that Moulton Howe would come to San Diego and deliver the piece to them. The Army wanted to apply any resulting physical phenomenon to its ground vehicle applications.

• Moulton Howe estimated that she’d spent about $900 to $2,000 a year from 1996 to 2019 “in all the various things that I’ve done.” Finally, she decided that her only option was to sell the pieces of metal to ‘To The Stars’ and the US Army. Said Moulton Howe, “I don’t want to stop what may be the only way they’re going to be able to test this.” She offered the metal for $35,000, which the buyers considered a low figure. In its September 2019 SEC filings, ‘To The Stars’ reported that it had paid $35,000 for ‘exotic’ meta-materials in July.

• Downplaying the exotic nature of this meta-material, Dr. Chris Cogswell, a PhD in Chemical Engineering who hosts the Mad Scientist Podcast said that he believes that this type of ‘exotic’ metal alloy is “made by mistake in metallurgy facilities all the time” by using magnesium to remove bismuth according to the Betterton-Kroll process.

 

The UFO researcher who sold bits of ‘exotic’ metal to former Blink-182 singer turned UFO mogul Tom DeLonge for $35,000 explained to Motherboard why she parted with the artifact and what will happen to it now.

In 2017, the New York Times ran an article about a secret Pentagon UFO program known as the “Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program.” The article noted that aerospace billionaire Robert Bigelow, whose interest in UFOs is no secret, modified buildings to house “metal alloys and other materials…that [allegedly] had been recovered from unidentified aerial phenomena.” Earlier this year, DeLonge’s UFO outfit To The Stars Academy paid $35,000 for ‘exotic’ metamaterials according to its September SEC filings.

Linda Moulton Howe with Art Bell

TTSA bought the metals from Linda Moulton Howe, a UFO researcher, in order to “conduct rigorous scientific evaluations to determine its function and possible applications,” the company said in a press release in July. In October, the company entered into a partnership with the US Army to research the metal and also study some pretty wild science, such as active camouflage, inertial mass reduction, and quantum communication.

             Dr Hal Puthoff

In an interview, Moulton Howe said that she and Art Bell, the late host of Coast to Coast AM, acquired the metal in 1996, along with a handful of letters from an alleged sergeant in the United States Army who still remains anonymous. Moulton Howe has made some pretty wild claims about the metal: She says that the sergeant’s grandfather yanked the metal off a wedge-shaped craft that crashed in 1947 near the White Sands proving grounds in New Mexico. She has also publicly claimed that the crash recovery team discovered two dead aliens and one that was still alive.

Moulton Howe and DeLonge both believe that, by blasting the metals with a magnetic field, it will float: “They had a piece and they explored whether magnetic fields would cause it to turn into a lifting body. Different frequencies,” Moulton Howe said. These are the same materials mentioned by DeLonge on his Joe Rogan interview where he stated, “if you hit it with enough terahertz, it’ll float.”

In any case, the metal is of interest to not only DeLonge and Moulton Howe, but also to the US Army, which told Motherboard that it would be studying metals like it by blasting it with magnetic fields and looking for “demonstrable physical phenomena.”

“The USG and US Army Ground Vehicle Systems Center has broad ranging Materials Analysis and Electro-Magnetic Spectrum laboratory capabilities at our disposal,” Jerry Aliotta, a U.S. Army spokesperson, told Motherboard. “There are materials and technologies of interest that TTSA possesses that we will evaluate and exploit.”

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