Tag: Kirtland Air Force Base

US Planned to Blow Up Moon, What Happened?

Article by Bhaswati Guha Majumder                            June 21, 2020                         (ibtimes.sg)

• At the dawn of the space race in the 1960s, a secret mission code-named ‘Project A119’ was devised by the US Air Force out of Kirtland Air Force Base in New Mexico to demonstrate to the Soviets and to the entire world that the U.S. could dominate space by exploding a bomb on Moon’s “terminator” – the area between the part of the surface that is illuminated by the Sun and the part that is dark. The military planned to add sodium to the bomb to make it glow and be highly visible to the naked eye from Earth. The plan was never carried out to avoid an “unparalleled scientific disaster.”

• This revelation is exposed in the unclassified Air Force document from 1959 entitled: ‘A Study of Lunar research Flights’, and in a new book by John Greenewald Jr. entitled: Secrets From the Black Vault: The Army’s Plan for a Military Base on the Moon and Other Declassified Documents that Rewrote History. Greenewald, who runs ‘The Black Vault’ website containing the largest civilian archive of declassified government documents, said, “A nuclear bomb on the surface of the Moon was definitely one of the stupider things the government could do.”

• Greenewald’s book also discloses the US military’s “Project Horizon”, in which the US Army planned to establish a permanent colony of 10 to 20 people on a Moon base by 1966. The plan was promoted in 1959 by the Chief of Research and Development for the U.S. Army, Lt General Arthur G. Trudeau, who claimed that if the U.S. could beat the Soviets to the Moon, “the prestige and psychological advantage to the nation will be invaluable.” They went so far as to design suits for the landing party and bulldozers for the construction. But the cost of the endeavor was estimated at over $6 billion annually (or $53 billion per year in today’s dollars), and was therefore shelved. Greenewald told the NY Post, “You look at these documents and wonder if this is what they’re telling us. Imagine what they’re not.”

• Today, NASA’s Exploration Technology Development Program is working on a plan to establish a permanent Moon base for scientists and astronauts. Also, Lewis Dartnell, a professor at the University of Westminster, has proposed a “Moontopia” city to be built inside massive hollow tubes formed by lunar volcanic eruptions.

[Editor’s Note]   It appears that while the Army’s plan to establish a Moon base was publicly terminated, the military industrial complex revised their plan by creating a NASA space program to occupy the public’s imagination by hiring ex-Nazis to put Americans on the Moon using rocket technology, while secretly pursuing a ‘secret space program’ to explore and colonize space using advanced anti-gravity and electromagnetic/warp drive technology throughout the ensuing decades.

And according to SSP whistle-blowers, the Nazis did in fact build a lunar base within hollow volcanic tubes on the Moon in the early 1940s, which the American military industrial complex improved upon and expanded during the 1950s and 60s through a subsequent collaboration with the post-WWII Nazi remnant headquartered in Antarctic, along with their reptilian allies.

 

Blowing up the moon — this idea may look like a sci-fi movie plot, but it is a fact that the U.S. government made plans to explode a bomb on moon’s “terminator” — the area between the part of the surface that is illuminated by the sun and the part that is dark.

Lt Gen. Arthur G. Trudeau

It was a secret mission code-named “Project A119.” The project was conceived at the dawn of the space race in the

               John Greenewald Jr.

1960s and designed to be monitored by a U.S. Air Force division located at Kirtland Air Force Base in New Mexico. All the details of this secret mission came to light in a recent report titled, A Study of Lunar Research Flights.

The Explosion of Moon

It is quite obvious that the plan did not work out. But if the U.S. had done, the explosion would have been visible from earth with naked eyes as the military had planned to add sodium to the bomb, which would make it glow and make it visible during the explosion.

John Greenewald Jr., author of the new book “Secrets From the Black Vault: The Army’s Plan for a Military Base on the Moon and Other Declassified Documents that Rewrote History” said, “A nuclear bomb on the surface of the moon was definitely one of the stupider things the government could do.”

The author also runs a website called The Black Vault, which is the largest civilian archive of declassified government documents including around 2.1 million pages. This webpage includes classified documents on assassinations and other phenomena legally obtained through Freedom of Information Act requests.

Greenewald wrote in his book that the U.S. Air Force devised the moon plot as they wanted to show the Soviets and the entire world that they can dominate space as well. Based on one such declassified document, he said that the plan was never carried out, most possibly due to the its potential to trigger an “unparalleled scientific disaster.”

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Farmington NM 70th Anniversary of Mass UFO Sighting

 

Article by Mike Easterling                             March 17, 2020                          (daily-times.com)

• 70 years ago, during three days – March 16, 17 and 18, 1950 – the town of Farmington in the northwestern corner of New Mexico experienced a sustained UFO invasion. Hundreds of residents watched a display of saucer-shaped UFOs in broad daylight over these three days. But this area was a hotspot for UFOs at the time. Two years earlier in March of 1948, a saucer craft landed on a mesa near the town of Aztec, about 15 miles from Farmington, and was taken away by the military. And of course the infamous Roswell crashes (there were actually two downed craft there) had occurred only three years earlier in 1947 in the southeastern part of the state.

• Farmington was a smaller community in those days with a population of no more than 5,000 people. The sightings took place between 11 a.m. and 12 noon each day in the dusty skies over San Juan County. People stood on the streets looking up at the spectacle. The sightings were thoroughly documented in various regional newspapers at the time. An Associated Press story was picked up by newspapers across the country. References to the Farmington UFO incident exist in many government documents.

• The Farmington UFO armada has become family lore for many long-time residents. Patty Tharp recalls her uncle, Clayton Boddy, recalling the sighting when she was growing up. Clayton was the business manager of local newspaper, The Daily Times, in 1950. “He described the object and said several other people saw it, as well,” Patty said. She noted that he wasn’t the kind to call attention to himself by manufacturing outlandish stories. The Daily Times’ account chronicles how pedestrians along Main Street could be seen looking skyward and pointing, and the paper was “deluged” with calls from readers reporting the objects.

• The saucer-shaped objects appeared to play tag, traveling at “almost unbelievable speeds.” The paper quoted a former Army captain who was walking on Broadway Avenue: “All of a sudden, I noticed a few moving objects high in the sky. Moments later, there appeared to be hundreds of them.” The Army officer said they appeared to be flying at an altitude of approximately 15,000 feet. Witnesses emphatically denied a theory that the objects were bits of cotton floating in the air. Many reported seeing a single red object that appeared to be leading the others.

• Marlo Webb, who later became the mayor of Farmington, was a 26-year old automotive parts manager at the time. Someone alerted him to the objects in the sky so he went out to look at them. He watched 12 to 20 objects, loosely arranged but moving steadily from east to west. The objects moved in an unusual way — “sideways, on edge and at every conceivable angle,” said Webb. “They were darting around almost like leaves in the sky being blown around. This is what made it easy to determine that they were saucer-shaped.”

• Marilu Waybourn was in college in the spring of 1950 when the incident took place. When she came home on break, she must have heard a dozen stories from her friends about the UFOs. Some of her friends even took her to the landing site of one of the objects. It was “a large circle, about 60 feet in diameter, with the sagebrush flattened out and singed weeds around the edge.”

• Pauline McCauley was a little girl herding sheep south of town at the time of the sighting. She heard a sound above her, looked up and spied a circular object that looked like an upside-down bowl. She could see windows on the saucer, and she could see three people inside of it wearing striped caps and navy blue uniforms with brass buttons.

• Ron Boddy is the son of one witness, Clayton Boddy. Ron said that his father was a veteran of World War II and the Korean War and was not easily impressed. His father was still a major in the Army Reserve at the time of the incident. Ron recalled his father getting a phone call later from a military official asking him to refrain from doing any more interviews on the subject. “I remember him saying he was asked not to bring it up or talk about it,” Ron said. But Ron’s father felt that these were some sort of military craft, not extraterrestrial spacecraft.

• On the final day, March 18th, a UFO sighting occurred that day in the town of Tucumcari, New Mexico, to the east near Texas. An Air Force captain and two technical sergeants stationed at Kirtland Air Force Base in Albuquerque reported seeing three strange objects in the sky. Newspaper accounts reveal that there were UFO sightings from that time period not just across New Mexico, but all over Texas and well into Mexico.

• A government official responded to the event by claiming the objects in the sky were the remnants of a ruptured, high-altitude U.S. Navy Skyhook balloon. But this isn’t plausible for an occurrence over a three day period. Also, there were no documented Skyhook balloon launches during that time frame.

• David Marler, an independent UFO researcher and author, has spent years studying the Farmington UFO incident. Marler says he is not sure why the Farmington UFO incident hasn’t gotten the attention it deserves. His research has uncovered dozens of similar sightings in the American Southwest, Mexico and Central America during that same time period. “There was a lot more other than Farmington going on (during March 1950),” Marler said.

[Editor’s Note]   No doubt that this region of the United States was a hotspot for UFO sightings in the late 1940s and early 1950s. At the time, this region was sparsely populated but contained numerous Army and Air Force military bases. Could this ‘armada’ of UFO craft over northwest New Mexico have been a demonstration of the early stages of the Nazi German ‘Dark Fleet’ being built underneath the ice of Antarctica? Were the Roswell crashes by German/Reptilian servants – the bio-android Greys – a way to ‘seed’ technology to the U.S.?  Perhaps this region of the U.S. was chosen by the Germans/Reptilians as a good place to reveal themselves and their technology to the American military without causing a public panic, paving the way for the US military industrial complex to join with them to provide the industrial capacity to build more advanced spacecraft for both sides, which ultimately happened.

 

FARMINGTON — Farmington has reached the 70th anniversary of one of the more sensational events in its history this week, but it’s a safe bet to say few residents will pay much attention to that milestone – or even be aware of it.

UFO ‘armada’ over Farmington NM

From March 16 to March 18 in 1950, the city experienced a mass UFO sighting, with some reports indicating “hundreds” of residents saw strange objects in the sky in broad daylight over the three-day period.

Their accounts were reported in breathless fashion not just in this publication — “HUGE ‘SAUCER’ ARMADA JOLTS FARMINGTON” screamed the banner headline on page 1 of The Daily Times on March 18, 1950 – but in many others as well. Those include The Santa Fe New Mexican (“Farmington ‘Invaded’ by Saucer Squadron”) and the Las Vegas (New Mexico) Daily Optic (“‘Space Ships’ Cause Sensation”).

An account of the incident by The Associated Press was picked up by newspapers across the country.

It’s a fantastic story, one that might have seemed destined to leave an indelible impression on UFO history and the sizable community of amateur sleuths and researchers who have made it their duty to investigate and publicize such incidents.

And, yet, the Farmington UFO incident of 1950 largely has been lost to history, especially when it is compared to its in-state counterpart, the famed, alleged crash of an alien spacecraft on a ranch northwest of Roswell in June 1947.

While that incident — sketchy as its details may be — is widely regarded as the most famous UFO-related event in history, having achieved legendary status over the years, the Farmington event that took place a few years later barely registers on anyone’s radar.

With seven decades having passed, that remains true, even though Farmington’s brush with UFO fame, or infamy, holds up to scrutiny far better than most other incidents, many of them much better known. That’s the assessment of an Albuquerque man who studies such phenomena, but who acknowledges the need to take a skeptical approach to most UFO reports.

David Marler, an independent UFO researcher and author who works in the health care field, has spent years studying the Farmington UFO incident, delivering his findings in the form of a website that serves as the most exhaustive and in-depth report on the event. He labels it “one of the most dramatic and well-documented cases in the history of UFO phenomenon” and said his research has uncovered dozens of similar sightings in the American Southwest, Mexico and Central America during that same time period.

“There was a lot more other than Farmington going on (during March 1950),” he said.

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One UFO Easy to Refute; Hundreds of Them, Not So Much

Listen to “E25 7-10-19 One UFO Easy to Refute; Hundreds of Them, Not So Much” on Spreaker.
by Gary Herron                   June 26th, 2019                    (abqjournal.com)

• On June 25th, David Marler spoke at the Esther Bone Memorial Library in Rio Rancho, NM on the ‘Flying Saucer Invasion of 1950’ in Farmington, NM (in the Four Corners region near Aztec).

• On March 16th 1950, the residents of Farmington were treated to an aerial display of perhaps a dozen “silver saucers led by a larger red one”, according to a front page story in The Farmington Daily Times. The next day, perhaps 500 of these saucers returned to Farmington’s skies. The Daily Times noted that, “The objects appeared to play tag high in the air. At times they streaked away at almost unbelievable speeds.” There were “hundreds of them zooming through the skies,” at estimated speeds of 1000 mph.  (see photo above)

• On March 17, 1950, there were similar sightings in Tucumcari, Las Vegas, and at Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico. From March to May 1950, there were numerous UFO sightings throughout the Southwest and Mexico.

• Authorities at the time blamed the mass sighing on cotton blowing in the wind and/or a ruptured experimental military balloon. One newspaper accused the entire population of being drunk on St Patty’s Day moonshine. Marler did wonder why more photographs of these saucers had not had been taken over the three-day period.

• Virgil Riggs, who had been a third-grader out for recess at a nearby Aztec school, recounted he and his classmates seeing hundreds of objects not only in formation but also doing maneuvers of some sort on all three mornings. “We all thought it was pretty neat,” Riggs said. He remembered a teacher who had cried at the time, despite no hint of the flying crafts posing a threat.

• Marler says that the Farmington UFO incident is one of the “most misrepresented and under-rated in UFOlogy. … It’s surprising how many people don’t know about it.” Marler continued, “We need to know what’s in our air space.” A self-proclaimed “skeptical believer,” Marler said he was “trying to break through that shell, the stigma of UFOs — that UFOs are only seen by crazy people,” and he was “trying to present factual, historical information.” When informed of his record-breaking attendance for his talk at the library, Marler remarked, “I guess it goes to show UFOs are of interest to people when presented in a credible manner.”

 

RIO RANCHO, N.M. — David Marler’s goal for his 80-minute talk, “The Flying Saucer Invasion of 1950 — Farmington and Beyond,” Tuesday evening at Esther Bone Memorial Library wasn’t to encourage folks to believe in UFOs.

Marler, a resident of Rio Rancho, ardent UFO researcher and self-proclaimed “skeptical believer,” said he was “trying to break through that shell, the stigma of UFOs — that UFOs are only seen by crazy people,” and he was “trying to present factual, historical information.”

David Marler

He talked about the mid-March 1950 events in the Four Corners area.

“There are incredible observations of incredible things,” Marler said, recounting what happened thousands of feet above Farmington, as well as above other areas of New Mexico more than 69 years ago.

In Farmington, it was estimated that about 85 percent of its residents observed from a mere handful of silver saucers ,led by a larger red one, to hundreds of them the next day.

What transpired there from March 16-18 makes the famous “Roswell Incident” pale in comparison, although the Farmington “invasion” lacks physical evidence.

But there are similarities: Each has been described as failures of balloons.

The Farmington Daily Times in its March 18, 1950, edition, reported in a front-page story that “Fully half of this town’s population still is certain today that it saw space ships or some strange aircraft — hundreds of them zooming through the skies.”

A local cop dismissed it, claiming it was only blowing cotton. At least one newspaper deemed the sightings due to “moonshine”; after all, the sightings were close to St. Patrick’s Day, a time when people imbibe.

But, an eyewitness told Marler almost 60 years later, blowing cotton was nothing new — why hadn’t people marveled over it year after year? Another decided it had been a Skyhook balloon launched from Holloman Air Force Base, and when it had ruptured, its shiny, plastic fragments had been seen showering down.

Later, though, Marler did some research and found none had been launched that week — and if one had burst, why would the parts to remain in the air for three days?

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