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US Army Refuses to Release Records on Tom DeLonge’s UFO Organization

 

Article by MJ Banias                          March 13, 2020                             (vice.com)

• In October of 2019, the US Army’s Combat Capabilities Development Command, a department focused on military research and development, entered a five-year contract with Tom DeLonges’ ‘To The Stars Academy’ (TTSA) to further its “collection and evaluation of novel materials.” For years, TTSA has been actively collecting ‘materials from alleged exotic sources’, ie: UFO crash debris and materials. Army spokesperson Doug Halleaux explains that the Combat Capabilities Development Command is interested in developing exotic science such as active camouflage, inertial mass reduction, and quantum communication.

• Army Regulation 70-57 exempts it from Freedom of Information Act requests for declassified government documents. So John Greenewald of The Black Vault filed a FOIA Request for all records and emails related to Dr. Joseph Cannon of U.S. Army Futures Command containing keywords such as “TTSA” and “To The Stars.”

• The Army’s response to Greenewald was that they indeed found 29 documents relating to his request. But each and every page is exempt from FOIA. Halleaux said that these documents are exempt from public scrutiny because they pertain to “trade secrets and commercial or financial information [that are] privileged or confidential” including email communications. Halleaux also told Motherboard (Vice.com) that he personally had no idea what the Army and TTSA were up to, and that if he did, he still couldn’t talk about it.

• Halleaux told Motherboard that the government believes the “key technologies or capabilities that [the Army] is investigating with TTSA are certainly on the leading edge of the realm of the possible”. But will the general public see any benefit from this five-year Army-TTSA collaboration? TTSA’s Chief Operating Officer and former Lockheed Martin Skunkworks head, Steve Justice, said that built into the collaborative contract’s language, ‘one of TTSA’s prime objectives is public transparency and commercial applications’, and calls for a ‘two-way sharing of information’.

• Says Justice, “The benefit of the [contract agreement] is to gain access to otherwise inaccessible government laboratories and technical expertise to expose all attributes of unusual materials and share the results. If unusual attributes are found, TTSA may use that information to create applications for public benefit. We cannot speak for any actions the Army might take after studying the results.”

• Chief Content Officer Kari DeLonge (Tom’s sister) said that she could not comment on whether the company had their hands on truly alien materials, but added that, “we are steadfast and dedicated to responsible analysis and reporting without speculation.”

• Perhaps the real question is why would advanced space-faring extraterrestrials keep crashing and leaving their scrap in the deserts of Nevada and New Mexico? Are they leaving humanity technological breadcrumbs? Or are they just dumping their garbage on our planet?

 

The U.S. Army refused to release any records about its deal with Tom DeLonge’s UFO-hunting group To the Stars Academy (TTSA).

           John Greenewald
          of ‘The Black Vault’

In October of 2019, the former Blink-182 frontman’s UFO organization joined forces with the US Army’s Combat

                   TTSA’s Steve Justice

Capabilities Development Command, a research and development body. According to the contract, the government is interested in studying some pretty exotic science such as active camouflage, inertial mass reduction, and quantum communication. In particular, the government is interested in the group’s ADAM Project, which Doug Halleaux, a spokesperson for the U.S. Army Combat Capabilities Development Command Ground Vehicle Systems Center described as “a global dragnet for the collection and evaluation of novel materials.” In 2018, TTSA put out a call for individuals and organizations to submit materials from alleged exotic sources as part of the project.

John Greenewald of The Black Vault, a website dedicated to collecting declassified government documents, explained in a recent blog post that the research and reports related to the deal are exempt from Freedom of Information Act requests as per Army Regulation 70-57.

   Kari DeLonge

Knowing this, Greenewald instead filed a FOIA Request regarding a copy of all records and emails related to Dr. Joseph Cannon of U.S. Army Futures Command (who is working on the agreement) containing keywords such as “TTSA” and “To The Stars.”

The Army got back to Greenewald telling him that 29 documents were found relating to his request, and each page was exempt from his request. The Army stated that it was not going to release any records. Motherboard reached out to Halleaux, the Army’s CCDC spokesperson, who said that any documents related to DeLonge’s organization would be classified as “trade secrets and commercial or financial information [that are] privileged or confidential.”

In other words, the public can’t know what the Army and TTSA is working on because of corporate and commercial secrets, namely intellectual property and finances. This includes related email communications. Halleaux told Motherboard that he personally had no idea what the Army and TTSA were up to, and if he did, he couldn’t talk about it.

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Luis Elizondo Opens Up On Why the Pentagon Keeps Changing Its Story on AATIP and UFOs

 

Article by Jazz Shaw                       January 13, 2020                        (hotair.com)

• Since we first learned of the (Pentagon’s $22 million) ‘Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program’ (AATIP), we’ve been told that it was a Department of Defense study of UAPs/UFOs, which Luis Elizondo ran before leaving the Pentagon to join the ‘To The Stars Academy of Arts and Sciences’. Both Elizondo and Harry Reid, the former Nevada Senator who initiated the Pentagon program, have gone on record confirming the UFO program and Elizondo’s role in it.

• Then more recently, DoD spokesperson Susan Gough backtracked saying that Elizondo was not involved with AATIP. Even stranger, Elizondo didn’t come forward to defend his statements. Said Elizondo, “There are elements in the Pentagon that are seriously upset with me for me ‘breaking rank’ in their eyes.” “I think (this disinformation is) a vendetta by a few in the Pentagon. But I think we will all know the real reason this year.”

• In a recent interview with John Greenewald of The Black Vault, Elizondo broke his silence stating, “As the senior ranking person in the AATIP program, I was ultimately responsible for ensuring the efficient and effective operations …performed by the outstanding men and women we had working in the program. My job was primarily to fend off the distractions so the rest of the team could do their job. …This includes fighting for resources, support, and personnel.”

• So why would Susan Gough keep insisting Elizondo wasn’t involved? Was the Pentagon deliberately and knowingly lying about Elizondo? Or was it a case of the DoD having lost the accurate records, as Gough has said? Elizondo suggests that this may have been a case where some in the Pentagon made “a deliberate attempt to confuse, hide, and conceal the truth.” Given the Pentagon’s casual relationship with the truth on this subject, that’s not so tough to believe.

• Toward the end of the interview, Elizondo refers to the recent admission from the Navy that there is at least one more, longer video of the tic-tac UFO encounter – something the Pentagon has repeatedly denied. “I am happy with the fact that recently some Navy former senior officials have come out and admitted there were more videos (of) greater length,” said Elizondo. “Also the Navy’s admission about the reality of UAPs and the fact they are creating new (UAP reporting) policies. … (This) is definitely a step in the right direction. I am not sure I can take credit for it but I like to think I played a small part in it.” “[I]t makes me feel a little vindicated.”

• Elizondo is still under an Non-Disclosure Agreement and doesn’t want to lose his security clearance, so he can’t say more. But perhaps he’s let something slip here. When referencing the “thousands of documents” related to the AATIP program that haven’t been cleared for release, he mentions “videos”… plural. There could be many UAP videos in the Navy’s possession from other incidents, but no one has filed a FOIA request for them. Still, Elizondo is confident that we will see a major disclosure of UAPs/UFOs by the Department of Defense this year.

 

One of the repeating themes we’ve run across in our coverage of the ongoing story of the Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program (AATIP)

       John Greenewald

and the search for information about UFOs/UAP is the disconnect between what the To The Stars Academy of Arts and Sciences (TTSA) has said about Luis Elizondo and what the Pentagon has had to say about him. If you ask TTSA, Harry Reid (who requested the program initially) or Elizondo himself, he ran the program. If you run the question by the Pentagon, specifically spokesperson Susan Gough, Elizondo had “no assigned duties” in the Defense Intelligence Agency and was not involved with AATIP.

          Susan Gough

So what’s with that disconnect? It’s a question I asked early on when researching this subject and never found a convincing answer. And the fact that Elizondo himself never seemed to come forward to defend his statements made it seem all the more strange. But now he’s broken his silence. In an interview with John Greenewald at The Black Vault, Elizondo tackles that question and many others. There’s no new documentation coming out of this interview (at least not yet) but at least we get to hear his side of the story. I’m going to include a couple of the more interesting snippets from the interview here, but if you have any interest in the subject I would suggest you click through and read the entire thing for yourself.

First of all, what does Elizondo say his role in AATIP was?

“As the senior ranking person in the AATIP program, I was ultimately responsible for ensuring the efficient and effective operations of the overall effort. However, in fairness, the lion’s work was performed by the outstanding men and women we had working in the program. My job was primarily to fend off the distractions so the rest of the team could do their job. In essence, my job was to catch the proverbial bullets so our folks could do their job without distraction. Not an unusual role for the senior person in any program to assume. This includes fighting for resources, support, and personnel.”

So if that’s the case, how does the Pentagon get the story so wrong? Why would Susan Gough keep insisting he wasn’t involved? Elizondo mentions that he’s kept quiet about this in the past primarily because he was threatened with having his security clearance taken away when he first came out with TTSA and he doesn’t want to lose it. But now he feels he needs to set the record straight.

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FAIR USE NOTICE: This page contains copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. ExoNews.org distributes this material for the purpose of news reporting, educational research, comment and criticism, constituting Fair Use under 17 U.S.C § 107. Please contact the Editor at ExoNews with any copyright issue.

Declassified UFO Report Documents ‘Green Circular Object’ Over Soviet Missile Range

 

Article by Andrew Whalen                         January 10, 2020                      (newsweek.com)

• In the summer of 1973, a Soviet source was working at the Soviet Union’s Sary Shagan Weapons Testing Range in present-day Kazakhstan. Also known as “Site 7”, the base was the headquarters for the “warhead checkout unit” with a garrison of Soviet Air Force personnel stationed there. That evening, the source stepped outside “for some air”, looked up and saw a “green circular object or mass in the sky.” The sky was clear with no clouds, and there was no sound. In a matter of minutes, the green circle widened and several green concentric circles formed around the center mass. Then the green mass disappeared.

• The CIA made note of this Cold War-era intelligence at the time. In 1978 the CIA released a heavily redacted, one paragraph version of the full intelligence report detailing the UFO sighting. Recently, John Greenewald of The Black Vault requested a Mandatory Declassification Review of the document and received a more detailed declassified CIA intelligence report on the incident, including rough maps of the facilities, the command hierarchy and personnel estimates. Weapons tested at the facility included experimental missiles, possible laser weapons, and warheads with cartridges loaded with hundreds of metal balls.

• Greenewald drew a parallel between Cold War-era sightings and modern UAP encounters documented by the U.S. Department of Defense. “This is very much similar to the context we see today, with threats on military facilities,” Greenewald told Newsweek in a telephone interview. A May 2019 Newsweek article (see here), first reported by Politico and The Washington Post, revealed that UAPs intrude upon military airspace as often as several times per month.

 

An intelligence report newly declassified by the CIA sheds new light on a nearly 50-year-old UFO mystery, revealing details gathered from an experimental missile range in present-day Kazakhstan.

The report not only includes unidentified aerial phenomena (UAP), but rumored Cold War “laser weapons.”

The UFO sighting took place in 1973 and was first revealed to the public in an “Intelligence Information Report” released by the CIA in 1978. Heavily redacted, the declassified version of the document contains only a single paragraph, detailing an encounter with a UFO at a location called “Site 7.”

The UFO encounter took place in the summer, when the sighting’s source “stepped outside for some air,” taking a break from watching a Canada vs. USSR sports match on TV. It was evening, and the source saw above “an unidentified sharp (bright) green circular object or mass in the sky.”

The UFO spotter believed the object was hovering above the cloud level, though it was a clear sky at the time of the sighting. The source was not, however, able to estimate the object’s diameter.

The sighting got weirder from there: “Within 10 to 15 seconds of observation, the green circle widened and within a brief period of time several green concentric circles formed around the mass. Within minutes the coloring disappeared. There was no sound, such as an explosion, associated with the phenomenon,” the document says.

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FAIR USE NOTICE: This page contains copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. ExoNews.org distributes this material for the purpose of news reporting, educational research, comment and criticism, constituting Fair Use under 17 U.S.C § 107. Please contact the Editor at ExoNews with any copyright issue.

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