Tag: Japan

Japan Aims to Put Man on the Moon, Collaborate With US

July 2, 2020                              (wionews.com)
• The Japanese government announced the country’s 10-year ‘Basic Plan on Space Policy’. Japan aims to double its space industry budget from $11 billion to $22 billion by the early 2030s, and work with the United States to track missiles and use intelligence-gathering satellites during natural disasters.

• One of the key components of the plan is to put a Japanese man on the Moon by 2024, while working with NASA. Japan plans to utilize its resources to strengthen its space policy through the ‘whole-of-government’ approach, while promoting public-private collaborations.

• Japan recently inaugurated the first ‘Space Operations Squadron’ at Fuchu Air Base in Tokyo as an “Air Self-Defense Force”, which will become fully operational by 2023. The squadron will work with the US Space Command to protect the country’s satellites from damage, including armed attacks according to the ‘Basic Space Law’.

• Japan already operates the ‘Quasi-Zenith Satellite System’ to enhance the US’s Global Positioning System in the Asia-Oceania regions. Japan plans to launch a new GPS navigation system of its own in 2023 with 7 satellites. It is concerned over China’s capability to jam or attack satellites with other neighboring countries North Korea and Russia capable of upsetting the regional balance in arms technology.

• In January 2019, China became the first nation to land a rover on the dark side of the lunar surface. This month, China plans to launch a mission to remote-controlled robot on the surface of Mars. The US has already sent four exploratory vehicles to Mars, and intends to launch a fifth this summer which should arrive around February 2021.

• China recently completed its own GPS-type geolocation system which it began in the early 1990s. 120 countries including Pakistan and Thailand are using the Chinese GPS system for port traffic monitoring, to guide rescue operations during disasters and other services, according to Chinese state media.

• When Donald Trump announced the creation of the new Space Force in December, Russia accused the US of seeing space as a place to wage war. In return, the US accused China and Russia of developing tools for jamming and cyberattacks that directly threaten US satellites.

• The Pentagon has stressed that it intends to maintain superiority in space to protect its GPS satellites. In the midst of an escalating space war, the US and Japan have strengthened their “space relations” to build their joint space network and strengthen their satellite force over the next 10 years.

 

Amid the coronavirus pandemic, the Japanese government for the first time in five years updated its Basic Plan on Space Policy while outlining the country’s 10-year basic space policy. It will work with the United States to not only track missiles but use intelligence-gathering satellites during natural disasters.

Japan’s President, Shinzo Abe, and US President Donald Trump

Japan aims to double its space industry by the early 2030s, which currently stands at $11 billion.

One of the key components of the plan is to put a Japanese man on the Moon by 2024 while working with NASA scientists.

Experts say Japan’s space policy is being led as a reaction to China’s 2013 Jade Rabbit lunar rover mission.

Public-private collaboration

“The Government of Japan, recognizing such huge potential of outer space and the severe situation that it is facing, hereby decides a basic plan on space policy for coming ten years with the view of the next two decades, and will secure sufficient budgetary allotments and other necessary resources, and effectively and efficiently utilize these resources to strengthen its space policy through the whole-of-government- approach, while promoting public-private collaborations,” the Japanse government said in a statement.

Air Self-Defense Force

Japan recently inaugurated the first Space Operations Squadron in Tokyo at Fuchu Air Base as an “Air Self-Defense Force” which will become fully operational by 2023.

It is meant to protect the country’s satellite from damage, including armed attacks while working with the US Space Command.

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Japan a Model When Encountering UFOs, Aliens

Article by Natsuki Edogawa                               June 18, 2020                              (asahi.com)

• In 1956, reports of silver metallic strips, like pieces of paper, were seen falling from the sky in Choshi, Chiba Prefecture, Tokyo, Japan. In Fukushima Japan, people reported seeing a UFO near Mount Senganmori. Takayama city in Gifu Prefecture and Tokyo’s Meiji Shrine are also well-known UFO hot-spots. UFO sightings continue to be reported daily in Japan.

• Encounters with extraterrestrial UFOs don’t seem to be just science fiction anymore. The U.S. Defense Department declassified three black-and-white video shot by U.S. Navy pilots in 2004 and 2015 of mysterious objects flying over the sea at a high speed, or rotating in the air. The British Defense Ministry opened its archive of UFO sighting reports revealing incidents such as ‘two orange balls floating in my backyard’. After more than 50 years, the British UFO research department was closed in 2009 because “no UFO sighting has shown any kind of military threat.”

• In 1968, the U.S. National Security Agency regarded the “Japanese way” as a model for dealing with extraterrestrials. “People should learn from Japan whose manner is to be friendly and tries to eagerly learn everything from other cultures and cooperate with each other as one country,” an NSA paper stated.

• Josen Takano of the space science museum in Hakui cited Japan’s period of national isolation from the 17th century through the 19th century, when it continued to absorb knowledge from other countries about subjects such as medicine and foreign languages at its maritime trading ports, as an example of how to approach extraterrestrials. Learning from others is also how Japan grew its economy at such a remarkable speed following World War II.

• Japanese Defense Minister Taro Kono recently acknowledged that protocols will be established for greeting extraterrestrial ‘just in case’. “We would like to decide what to do in the event we encounter a UFO,” Kono said.

• Researcher of supernatural phenomena Bintaro Yamaguchi says that the public is fascinated by UFOs. With mobile phones, people’s personal information, pictures, and family relationships are readily available on the internet. “Maybe people are tired of belonging to such a society,” said Yamaguchi. Perhaps people, like UFOs, “want to be unidentified objects themselves.” “I can hear their voices beneath the surface saying that they are envious of UFOs.”

 

With the U.S. Defense Department’s release of military video footage of what are purported to be UFOs, encounters with extraterrestrials suddenly don’t seem to be just science fiction anymore.

Even Japanese Defense Minister Taro Kono acknowledged recently that protocols will be established just in case.

Japanese Defense Minister Taro Kono

“We would like to decide what to do in the event we encounter a UFO,” he said.

More than 50 years ago, Japan was regarded as a model for dealing with extraterrestrials.

The U.S. National Security Agency (NSA) made recommendations if humans were to encounter aliens from space.

It has disclosed a 1968 paper that says the “Japanese way” was a good example of “assimilating other technologies and maintaining their identity even if their technology was inferior to the other ones.”

It adds, “People should learn from Japan whose manner is to be friendly and tries to eagerly learn everything from other cultures and cooperate with each other as one country.”

A science journalist and professor who is involved with a space science museum in Hakui, Ishikawa Prefecture, said “Japanese flexibility has attracted a lot of attention.”

Josen Takano cited Japan’s period of national isolation from the 17th century through the 19th century when it continued to absorb knowledge about subjects such as medicine and foreign languages at Dejima, a small island in Nagasaki Port, used as a trading post with other countries.

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Alien Territory: The Rise of UFO Tourists

Listen to “E179 Alien Territory: The Rise of UFO Tourists” on Spreaker.
November 21, 2019                   (national geographic.co.uk)

• UFO-themed tourism has become big business. From Roswell, New Mexico to Sri Lanka, Chile, Russia, Japan and Australia, tourists are booking UFO hot spots for their vacations.

• After the “Storm Area 51” Facebook challenge that went viral this past summer, the Area 51 military facility where many believe spaceships, alien artifacts, and even the remains of alien bodies are stored has become another “must see” for the UFO tourist. Nate Arizona seized the moment and started an Area 51 guided tour where he brings clients to the gates of Area 51, under the constant scrutiny of security cameras and “cammo guys” wearing mirrored sunglasses and driving white SUVs. “Don’t worry,”says Nate. “[A]s long as we don’t enter the base proper, we’ll be absolutely fine.” Nate’s ‘Paranormal Tour of the US Southwest’, which also takes in the nearby Extraterrestrial Highway and the town of Rachel, Nevada, eight miles from Area 51, recently became one of Airbnb’s official ‘experiences’, and bookings are landing quickly.

• Airbnb’s head of Adventures, Caroline Boone, says the company is “delighted” with the demand for Nate’s paranormal tours. But it is the committed conspiracy theorists that’s driving the current trend — causing a rise in bookings both in Rachel and other UFO hotspots. Cody Theising, the manager of the ‘Little A’Le’Inn’ in Rachel, says that she has also seen an uptick in bookings. “There’s definitely been an increase in business out here in the last couple of years. We’re seeing a lot more tours… coming through.”

• Armando Martinez from Denver says he ‘absolutely loved’ Nate’s Nevada tour. Armando thinks paranormal tourism is growing for one simple reason — more people are believing in it. “Improvements in technology, particularly mobile phones, means there’s far more evidence of the paranormal being collected. There’s so much documentation out there now that you have to really step back and re-evaluate things, and tours like this are great for that kind of perspective.”

• Roswell, New Mexico is the site of perhaps the most famous UFO crash in July 1947, and what many believe is the mother of all government cover-ups. UFO tourism has kicked into hyperdrive of late and the ‘grey dollar’ is being spent as never before. Dennis Balthaser runs extraterrestrial-themed tours in Roswell, twice daily, five days a week. “By the end of this year I’ll have cleared 300 tours,” says Dennis who books visitors from the UK, China, Australia, South Africa and Japan, as well as most US states.

• Other UFO hot spots in the US include the Pacific Northwest, where the National UFO Reporting Center received three times the annual average of reported UFO sightings in 2018; Kecksburg, Pennsylvania where a car-sized, acorn-shaped metal object covered in hieroglyphics fell to earth in a fiery blaze in 1965; and Sedona, Arizona which hosts some of the most frequent UFO sightings in the world.

• In 2008, Chile opened a UFO Trail near the town of San Clemente, an ET hub that’s generated hundreds of sightings. Arguably the best way to experience it is with one of the local horse-riding operators, which carry telescopes in their saddle bags and teach you about the stars while discussing the Earth-bound craft that supposedly came from them. These extra-terrestrial sightseeing expeditions typically end with an intergalactic debate over pisco sours around a campfire.

• Sri Lanka’s UFO tourism focuses on ‘alien mystery tours’ in the North Central Province. Japan’s own UFO tourism capital is Asuka, a tiny village famed for its mysterious carved granite monoliths including the Rock Ship of Masuda, a 15ft-tall, 800-tonne block with a straight central ridge and two one-metre square holes cut from it.

• The self-proclaimed UFO capital of Australia is Wycliffe Well, locate in the Northern Territory where there is a recorded UFO sighting every couple of days, on average. Visitors can stay in cabins at the Wycliffe Well Holiday Park where the walls are covered in newspaper clippings of UFO sightings. Stay more than 48 hours and you’re ‘guaranteed’ a sighting of your own.

• Russia’s answer to Area 51 is the remote village of Molyobka, 600 miles east of Moscow. Here in the foothills of the Urals, locals have reported seeing a range of phenomena, including hovering lights, strange symbols written across the sky, and even translucent beings. There are persistent rumors of people developing enhanced intelligence or superhuman powers after visiting the area.

 

From the gate, Area 51 looks deserted. It would be so easy to simply step over the dotted line in the road here, to enter America’s most mysterious military installation. But Nate Arizona knows better.

“Don’t even think about it,” warns my previously jovial guide, brow furrowing under his neon-coloured bandana. “You’d be face first in the dirt with a gun to the back of your head before you knew what was happening.”

    Rachel, Nevada’s ‘Little A’Le’Inn’

For alien enthusiasts, this is ground zero. The secret air force base in Nevada has been at the centre of extra-terrestrial speculation since the 1940s. Many believe UFO wreckage from the infamous Roswell Incident of 1947 is hidden inside this perimeter — along with the remains of its intergalactic pilots. Others speculate that the facility is dedicated to the reverse engineering of recovered alien technology, or even time travel. Whichever way you cut it, an awful lot of people believe that if the truth is out there, it’s probably in here.

               Roswell’s UFO Museum

The ‘Storm Area 51’ Facebook joke, which went viral earlier this summer (with two million people signing up for the mass invasion of the facility in order to ‘see them aliens’) put this highly classified military base firmly back in the public eye. But another trend has been growing out here too: that of UFO tourism.

Nate’s own tour, which also takes in the nearby Extraterrestrial Highway and the tiny town of Rachel — a hub of purported paranormal activity — recently became one of Airbnb’s ‘experiences’, and bookings are landing faster than the Martian invasion force in HG Wells’ classic sci-fi novel The War of the Worlds.

Kecksburg’s ‘acorn’ UFO replica

“People get very excited about coming out to Area 51, but once we arrive at the gates, they realise how serious the whole thing is,” says Nate as we march along the perimeter, looking for a better vantage point. “The US government didn’t even officially admit this place existed until 2013, after all. There are motion sensors and cameras everywhere, and they follow your every move. Don’t be under any illusion — there are multiple guards watching us right now.”

   alien monument near Molyobka, Russia

Those guards are what ufologists call ‘camo guys’ — the real-life equivalent of the Men in Black from the Hollywood film. I’ve heard these defenders of the Earth drive unmarked white SUVs, sitting sphinx-like behind mirrored sunglasses as they trail visitors from a discreet distance. Sure enough, as we approach another gate, Nate spots a white SUV parked on a bluff, which flashes its headlights as we approach.

“The camo guys are just letting us know they’re there,” says Nate. “Don’t worry — as long as we don’t enter the base proper, we’ll be absolutely fine.”

Under these watchful eyes, we continue our exploration, Nate pointing out satellite towers, barracks and even a bizarre mirrored pyramid visible within the perimeter. As we pass, mounted cameras grind and whir in our direction and the inscrutable SUV maintains its vigilant watch.

    the Rock Ship of Masuda in Sri Lanka

Shadows slowly lengthening, we finally retreat to Rachel — a dusty, one-horse town a bumpy, eight-mile drive from Area 51. At its only motel, the appropriately monikered ‘Little A’Le’Inn’, manager Cody Theising says they too have seen a noted uptick in bookings as UFO tourism has taken off.

“There’s definitely been an increase in business out here in the last couple of years; we’re seeing a lot more tours like yours coming through,” says Cody, as I sip one of the Little A’Le’Inn’s signature ‘Spiced Abduction’ cocktails next to a sign that reads ‘Earthlings Welcome’.

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