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George Adamski Got Famous Sharing UFO Photos and Alien ‘Encounters’

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Article by Greg Daugherty                           January 9, 2020                           (history.com)

• George Adamski is perhaps the most famous UFO contactee and is certainly one of the most controversial characters in UFO history. Throughout his life, Adamski took photos of UFOs, wrote books and told stories of his encounters with human-like extraterrestrials from other planets in our solar system, gaining international fame as well as criticism.

• Adamski was born in Poland in 1891, coming to the U.S. with his parents and growing up in northern New York state. He had little formal education. In 1934, he told a Los Angeles Times reporter that he had lived in Tibet as a child, and planned to establish the first Tibetan monastery in Laguna Beach, California. In 1936, he told the newspapers that he was going to establish the world headquarters of an organization called ‘Universal Progressive Christianity’ in Laguna Beach. He also offered a tax plan to end the Great Depression in 1938.

• After World War II, Adamski’s ambitions turned to UFOs. In October 1946, he spotted his first UFO – a motionless black cigar-shaped craft. In August 1947, he witnessed a procession of 184 UFOs in the sky. By 1949, he’d attached a camera to his six-inch telescope and began scanning the skies. Adamski estimated that he took about 500 flying saucer photos, from which he got a dozen good quality shots. Newspapers and magazines published Adamski’s photos, and he gave lectures on UFOs. He also operated a tiny restaurant with a small telescope set up out back (in a rural area between Los Angeles and San Diego).

• In 1952, Adamski reported that he had met and conversed with a visitor from Venus in a California desert using a combination of hand gestures and mental telepathy, which he recounted in his 1953 book: Flying Saucers Have Landed. His 1955 sequel: Inside the Space Ships, recounted meeting human-like emissaries from Mars and Saturn. Adamski claimed that every planet in our solar system had human-like inhabitants, as did a base on the dark side of the Earth’s Moon.

• In his books, Adamski claimed that his extraterrestrial friends took him aboard a scout ship, flew him to a mother ship hovering over the Earth, gave him a ride around the Moon, and treated him to a colorful travelogue about life on Venus. He said that a 1,000 year-old man shared with him the secrets of the universe, some of which he was not allowed to divulge back on Earth.

• Adamski recounted his meeting in November 1952 with a human-like visitor from Venus in a remote part of the California desert. “The beauty of his form surpassed anything I had ever seen,” said Adamski. “(His) hair was sandy in color and hung in beautiful waves to his shoulders, glistening more beautifully than any woman’s I have ever seen.” The Venusian had come to deliver a message: ‘Earthlings should stop messing around with atomic bombs before they destroy their entire planet.’

• Project Bluebook investigator J. Allen Hynek called Adamski’s flying saucer photos ‘crude fakes’. Hynek’s Bluebook partner, Edward J. Ruppelt, visited Adamski’s restaurant in 1953 to find Adamski hawking his UFO photos. While Ruppelt didn’t believe him, he wrote that he was impressed all the same. “To look at the man and to listen to his story, you had an immediate urge to believe him,” said Ruppelt, … he had “the most honest pair of eyes I’ve ever seen.” SciFi writer Arthur C. Clarke also denounced Adamski’s work and called his believers “nitwits.” But in 1959, Queen Juliana of the Netherlands invited Adamski to her palace to discuss extraterrestrials. Adamski is said to have also had a secret meeting with the Pope in 1963.

• In 1961, Adamski published his last book: Flying Saucers Farewell, and continued to lecture widely. In 1965, Adamski predicted that a large fleet of flying saucers would soon descend on Washington, D.C. He died in April 1965 at age 74.

• Since his death, Adamski’s critics have tended to portray him as a harmless, small-time con artist. Others like Arthur C. Clarke and J. Allen Hynek have accused Adamski of discrediting the entire field of UFO research. But Adamski stuck by his story to the end. In his first book, Adamski gave an upbeat but ominous message: “Let us be friendly. Let us recognize and welcome the men from other worlds! They are here among us.”

 

To some, he was a prophet. To others, a laughing stock. Even today, more than half a century after his death, George Adamski remains one of the most curious and controversial characters in UFO history.

Adamski had multiple claims to UFO fame. Starting in the late 1940s, he took countless photos of what he insisted were flying saucers. But experts, including J. Allen Hynek, scientific consultant to the Air Force’s Cold War-era UFO investigation team Project Blue Book, dismissed them as crude fakes.

                 George Adamski

Then, in 1952, Adamski reported that he had met and conversed with a visitor from Venus in a California desert, using a combination of hand gestures and mental telepathy.

His story would only get stranger from there.

A star gazer is born

Adamski chronicled his alleged adventures in several books. The first, Flying Saucers Have Landed (1953), coauthored with Desmond Leslie, recounted his chat with the Venusian. Widely read at the time, it later gained a new generation of fans in the trippy 1960s.

Adamski’s 1955 sequel, Inside the Space Ships, described further meetings, not only with the Venusian but also with emissaries from Mars and Saturn.In Adamski’s telling, every planet in our solar system was populated with human-like inhabitants, as was the dark side of the earth’s moon.

In the 1955 book, Adamski claimed that his new friends took him aboard one of their scout ships, flew him to an immense mother ship hovering over the earth, gave him a ride around the moon and treated him to a colorful travelogue about life on Venus.

Along the way, he was also tutored by a space man he called “the master.” The master, who was said to be nearly 1,000 years old, shared the secrets of the universe with Adamski, only some of which he was allowed to divulge back on earth.

Preposterous as his stories seemed, Adamski became an international celebrity and lectured widely. Queen Juliana of the Netherlands raised a public stir after inviting him to her palace in 1959 to discuss extraterrestrial doings. Adamski supposedly claimed a secret 1963 meeting with the pope, as well.

Adamski soon had followers all over the planet. But not everybody was on board. Arthur C. Clarke, the author of 2001: A Space Odyssey, not only denounced Adamski’s work but characterized his believers as “nitwits.”

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UFOs Around the World: Denmark

by Robbie Graham                   August 29, 2018                     (mysteriousuniverse.org)

• Over the next several weeks, this writer, Robbie Graham, will conduct interviews with leading UFO researchers from countries around the world. This week, Robbie interviews Pia Knudsen in Denmark.

• In 2009, Knudsen co-founded Exopoltics Denmark, which now operates as UFO Denmark. Knudsen has been interviewed on national radio and television; she has written articles on the UFO topic and lectured in both the UK and Norway. Her’s is the only group currently organizing and sponsoring an annual UFO conference featuring international speakers.

• There seems to be an increase in contact cases in Denmark. Nowadays social media plays a key role in connecting people who seek information. Very rarely do people see disc-shaped UFOs. It is mainly orbs being reported. Knudsen has had several of her own UFO sightings.

• Pia identifies Major H. C. Petersen as a pioneer in Danish ufology. In 1952, Petersen was sent to Wright Patterson Airforce base in Ohio for training where he was astonished to learn that the Americans took the UFO topic seriously. The young officer became convinced that UFOs were real and was profoundly influenced by the teachings of George Adamski. In 1957, he founded Denmark’s first UFO group, Scandinavian UFO Information (SUFOI). Petersen passed away in 2013.

• Knudsen describes a compelling Danish UFO case when a police officer, Evald Maarup Hansen spotted a UFO above his police car on a remote country road in 1970, and again in 1973. Both the car and police radio shut down but he managed to take photos of the object. At the time, Air Force radar operator Nis Krog picked up the object on radar corroborating Hansen’s account.

• Amid great media hype, the Danish air force released their UFO files in January 2009. However, of the reported 15,000 files that the air force had collected since the 1950’s, only 228 case files were actually released. The government claims that all of the files from before 1978 are missing. The air force now refers all UFO incidents to the SUFOI UFO group and the government no longer comments on the topic.

 

Over the next several weeks, I’ll be conducting interviews with leading UFO researchers from countries around the world in an effort to paint a picture of global UFOlogy today.

This week, our global UFO trek takes us to Denmark, and to Pia Knudsen. Pia has had an interest in UFOs since a childhood sighting in British Columbia, Canada. In 2009 Pia co-founded Exopoltics Denmark, which now operates as UFO Denmark. Pia has been interviewed on national radio and for the National Geographic channel; she has written articles on the UFO topic and lectured in both the UK and Norway. In her current role as director of UFO Denmark, Pia says that she “strives to make the best research and documentation available for the Danish public.”

          Pia Knudsen

RG: Who have been the defining figures in Danish UFOlogy over the past 70 years (for better or for worse), and why?

PK: Major H. C. Petersen was a pioneer in Danish ufology, founding the first nationwide UFO group, Scandinavian UFO Information (SUFOI), in 1957.

As a captain lieutenant in 1952, Hans Christian Petersen was sent to Wright Patterson Airforce base in Ohio for training. During his stay, Petersen became astonished to learn that the Americans took the UFO topic seriously. Project Blue Book had headquarters at the base and the young officer became convinced that UFOs were real. In the mid-1950s, Petersen had his own UFO radar sighting at Skydstrup Airforce base, which fueled a lifelong interest in UFOs. Due to disagreements regarding George Adamski, H. C. Peterson left the SUFOI group in 1965 and went on to create a second group, IGAP (International Get Acquainted Program) to promote Adamski’s teachings. Both UFO groups still exist. While the SUFOI group has become increasingly skeptical of the topic and refers to UFOs as a myth with earthly explanations for all sightings, the IGAP group is slowly diminishing and now has very few members. H. C. Petersen passed away in 2013.

Early Danish UFO groups include UFO-Fyn, DISC and Nordisk UFO Organization. FUFOS (Frederiksberg UFO Studygroup) had quite a following in the 1970s, promoting not only UFOs but a mix of topics. The group eventually changed its name and focus; it seldom focusses on UFOs nowadays.

In 2009 I co-founded the Exopolitics Denmark group, focusing on political and environmental activism surrounding UFOs. Each year we invite leading researchers to Denmark. In 2014, you [Robbie Graham] joined George Knapp and Terje Toftenes in Copenhagen to speak about UFOs and the media. Other speakers have included Richard Dolan, Robert Hastings, Timothy Good, Suzy Hansen, Gary Heseltine, Jeremey Corbell, Mary Rodwell, Steven Bassett, A. J. Gevaerd and more. In May 2018, Grant Cameron visited both Copenhagen and Kolding.

In late-2017, Exopolitics Denmark voted to change its name to UFO Denmark. We now have a broader focus to create debate and provide information surrounding the UFO topic.

RG: What do you consider to be the most compelling Danish UFO incident on record, and why?

PK: Police officer Evald Maarup Hansen twice spotted a UFO above his police car on a remote country road in 1970, and again in 1973. Both the car and police radio shut down during the event, but Evald Maarup managed to take three pictures of object. He reluctantly spoke about the event after collegues had contacted the media. In 2010 I located a radar operator, Nis Krog, who had been on duty at the nearby Skydstrup Airforce Base and had seen an unidentified object on his radar at the time and in the area Maarup had his encounter. This case was included in a National Geographic documentary I worked on in 2013 and Nis Krog went public for the first time confirming his radar observations.

RG: What is the Danish government’s official stance on UFOs? When was the last time it issued a statement on the subject?

PK: The Danish air force released their UFO files in January 2009. There was a big hype in the press. The air force stated that they had collected 15,000 files since the mid-fifties but in fact only released 228 cases on the day. They claimed all files from before 1978 had gone missing. On average, 250 cases were reported each year, so I estimate that 7,500 cases should have been released in 2009. No members of the press or the SUFOI UFO group questioned why so few cases were released. The air force’s offical website recommends all new incoming cases be reported to the SUFOI group. I have done much more research into the file release and have an article on the subject. The government no longer comments on the topic.

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How Closely Are Ufologists Watched By Government Agencies?

by Nick Redfern                   May 25, 2018                    (mysteriousuniverse.org)

• Beginning in the 1950’s, the FBI and the CIA closely kept their eye on UFO-themed researchers, groups and abductees such as George Adamski, Truman Bethurum, George Van Tassel, and Frank Stranges. They seemed more interested in their possible ties to communism than their UFO experiences. In 1950’s England, the British Police Force’s Special Branch secretly watched the Aetherius Society, but not for their beliefs in aliens or UFOs, but because of their opposition to atomic weapons.

• A CIA document dated February 9, 1953 reveals that an agent infiltrated a meeting of the California Committee for Saucer Investigations (CSI) in L.A. where Dr. Walter Riedel, the former Chief Designer at the German Experimental Rocket Center at Peenemunde who came to the U.S. as a ‘paperclip’ scientist spoke. Reidel was now a project engineer in the Aerophysics Department of the North American Aviation Corp. “He [Reidel] gave every impression of being a competent scientist, especially knowledgeable on rocket matters. He seemed a balanced person, not given to fixations.”

• The CIA document goes on to say that the CSI had received some 1570 letters relating to reported UFO sightings. The agent was impressed at how thorough they conducted their investigations, considering only a small fraction of sightings to be actual unexplained UFOs. Those are forwarded to Wright Field, Dayton, Ohio.

• Dr. Riedel even indicated the CSI planned to perpetrate a ‘hoax’ UFO sighting over Malibu in front of thousands of people in order to gauge public reaction and response. “This experiment is designed to give a better background against which future sightings can be evaluated.” This hoax may have occurred in late January 1953.

• The CIA agent also reported that the CSI monitored the Russian newspaper, PRAVDA, and that a CSI associate, George P. Sutton, also of Aerophysics Department in North American Aviation, Inc., gave a presentation before the American Rocket Society in New York City on December 4, 1952 entitled ‘Rockets Behind the Iron Curtain.’
• Of incidental interest, the National Aeronautical Association politely suggested to Dr. Riedel that he disassociate himself with the California Committee for Saucer Investigations.

[Editor’s Note] For a thorough discussion of former Nazi rocket scientists’ corporate incursion into the United States military industrial complex during the 1950’s read Dr Michael Salla’s latest book, Antarctica’s Hidden History – Corporate Foundations of Secret Space Programs.

 

That’s a question I’m often asked, mainly because of my interest in the Men in Black mystery. Although there is no doubt in my mind that the vast majority of all MIB encounters are of a paranormal nature, at least a small number are connected to government agencies. Indeed, there is hard evidence showing that UFO-themed researchers and groups have been watched – and at times watched closely. For example, the FBI has released its files on many of the Contactees of the 1950s, such as George Adamski, Truman Bethurum, George Van Tassel, and Frank Stranges. It’s important to note, though, that the UFO aspects of the investigations were secondary; sometimes, even further down the line than that. Issues relative to politics and communism were far more pressing, from the FBI’s perspective. In the U.K., in the late 1950s, the Aetherius Society was secretly watched by the British Police Force’s Special Branch. Not for their beliefs in aliens or UFOs, though, but because of their stance on atomic weapons.

  Dr. Walter Riedel

With that all said, it’s time now to take a look at one of the earliest UFO research groups that was watched by the CIA: the Civilian Saucer Investigation (although in some of the CIA’s papers on the CSI, it’s incorrectly referred to as the California Committee for Saucer Investigation). A CIA document of February 9, 1953 begins as follows (you can find the document at this CIA link):
“1. Recently a member of the Los Angeles Office had occasion to hear Dr. Walter Riedel tell something of the activities of the California Committee for Saucer Investigations (CSI). His comments, as follows, may be of interest: 2. Dr. Riedel indicated he was formerly Chief Designer at the German Experimental Rocket Center at Peenemunde. He has been in the US as a ‘paperclip’ scientist for some years. He is now a Project engineer in the Aerophysics Department (Guided Missiles) of the North American Aviation Corp. He gave every impression of being a competent scientist, especially knowledgeable on rocket matters. He seemed a balanced person, not given to fixations.”

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