Aliens May Exist in Ways We Can’t Fathom, Which is Why We Haven’t Found Them

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Listen to “E44 7-23-19 Aliens May Exist in Ways We Can’t Fathom” on Spreaker.

Article by Colleen Killingsworth                    July 16, 2019                    (my9nj.com)

• In a report published in the journal Acta Astronautica, researchers from the University of Cadiz in Spain say that aliens could be all around us, but may exist in ways we cannot even fathom. We simply don’t know how to detect them. One of the report’s co-authors, Gabriel G. De la Torre, says, “Our traditional conception of space is limited by our brain, and we may… be unable to see them.”

• The Spanish research team used a classic psychological experiment that demonstrates “inattention blindness” as a possible explanation for our inability to see what we aren’t looking for. They point to a video of a social experiment by Daniel J. Simons and Christopher Chabris in 1999 where they asked participants to watch the video and keep a silent count of the number of passes of a basketball made by the people in white shirts. A person in a gorilla suit walks through the video frame for nine seconds, faces the camera, thumps his chest, then leaves. Only half of the people who watched the video in the original experiment saw the gorilla. (see 1:21 minute video below)

• The “Invisible Gorilla” experiment revealed that human perception isn’t foolproof. Most people miss a lot of what’s going on around them as they try to filter and process the incredible amounts of perceptual information being fed to their brains. Said De la Torre, “It is very striking, but very significant and representative of how our brain works.”

• De la Torre and co-author Manuel A. Garcia conducted a similar experiment. They asked 137 adults to look at aerial photographs and determine whether they featured artificial structures, like roads and buildings, or natural elements, like mountains and rivers. In one photo, De la Torre and Garcia inserted an image of a person in a gorilla suit. Only 45 out of the 137 participants noticed the gorilla in the aerial photograph. De la Torre says that the more “intuitive individuals identified the gorilla in our photo more often than those (who are) more rational and methodical.”

• According to De la Torre and Garcia, the result of the experiments show that just as people may not see the gorilla in the image, aliens could very well exist in a way that humans are not oriented to perceive or understand. “[W]e tend to see them from our perceptive.” Says De la Torre, “What we are trying to do with this differentiation is to contemplate other possibilities – for example, beings of dimensions that our minds cannot grasp; or intelligences based on dark matter or energy, which make up almost 95 percent of the universe and which we are only beginning to glimpse. There is even the possibility that other universes exist, as the texts of Stephen Hawking and other scientists indicate.”

• De la Torre and Garcia suggest that focusing too much on certain methods, like SETI‘s search for radio signals, is limiting our ability to discover the “cosmic gorilla” that is non terrestrial life. Solely searching for civilizations populating other planets or solar systems may limit our ability to conceive of and potentially locate inter-dimensional capable civilizations, the research team suggests. Expanding our search methods may bring us closer to the truth.

• In other words, De la Torre and Garcia think we need to first check our egos and account for the limitations of human biology and psychology before we can expect to comprehend advanced extraterrestrial or non-terrestrial life.

 

CADIZ, Spain – Aliens may exist in ways we cannot even fathom and they could be all around us, but because we don’t know how to detect them, we can’t see what’s right in front of our faces. At least that’s what a group of researchers from the University of Cadiz in Spain suggested in a report published in the journal Acta Astronautica.

“Our traditional conception of space is limited by our brain, and we may have the signs above and be unable to see them,” Gabriel G. De la Torre, one of the co-authors of the study, told the Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology (FECYT). “Maybe we’re not looking in the right direction.”

The research team used a classic psychological experiment to provide a possible explanation as to why we humans have not found any indication of extraterrestrial life. The theory hinges on the idea of inattention blindness, which suggests that we don’t see what we aren’t looking for.

     Gabriel G. De la Torre

Countless teachers and professors have used a video to illustrate exactly how this phenomenon works. The experiment was originally conceived and carried out by Daniel J. Simons and Christopher Chabris in 1999. They asked participants to watch the video and keep a silent count of the number of passes made by the people in white shirts.

Chabris and Simons showed the video to a group of participants at Harvard University, and the experiment went on to become one of the best-known in psychology because of its surprising outcome.

The experiment is called “The Invisible Gorilla” because a person in a gorilla suit spends nine seconds on screen — they stroll through the video frame at one point, face the camera and thump their chest, then leave — but half of the people who watched the video in the original experiment didn’t see the gorilla at all. It was like the gorilla was invisible.

The experiment revealed that human psychology and perception aren’t as foolproof as many of us would like to believe. Most people miss a lot of what’s going on around them as they try to filter and process the incredible amounts of perceptual information being fed to their brains through the senses and nervous system every nanosecond of every day.
“It is very striking, but very significant and representative of how our brain works,” De la Torre told FECYT.

De la Torre and co-author Manuel A. Garcia used a similar approach in their research. They asked 137 adults to take the cognitive reflection test, fill out a perception and attention questionnaire and look at aerial photographs and determine whether they featured artificial structures, like roads and buildings, or natural elements, like mountains and rivers. In one photo, De la Torre and Garcia inserted an image of a person in a gorilla suit to see if participants noticed.

Only 45 out of the total 137 participants noticed the gorilla in the aerial photograph.

1:21 minute “Invisible Gorilla” selective attention test (Simons and Chabris 1999)

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Acta Astronautica, Christopher Chabris, Daniel J. Simons, Gabriel G. De la Torre, inattention blindness, Manuel A. Garcia, podcast, SETI, Spain, Stephen Hawking, The Invisible Gorilla, University of Cadiz


ExoNews Editor

Duke Brickhouse is a former trial lawyer and entertainment attorney who has refocused his life’s work to exposing the truth of our subjugated planet and to help raise humanity’s collective consciousness at this crucial moment in our planet’s history, in order to break out of the dark and negative false reality that is preventing the natural development of our species, to put our planet on a path of love, light and harmony in preparation for our species’ ascension to a fourth density, and to ultimately take our rightful place in the galactic community.

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