• Home
  • To The Stars Academy of Arts and Science

Tag: To The Stars Academy of Arts and Science

UFO Lobbyists Are Trying to Get the Truth From Congress, and They’re Winning

Listen to “E125 UFO Lobbyists Are Trying to Get the Truth From Congress, and They’re Winning” on Spreaker.

Article by MJ Banias                       October 4, 2019                     (vice.com)

• In 1996, Steven Bassett registered as Capitol Hill’s lone UFO lobbyist in Washington D.C. and founded the Paradigm Research Group. Registered lobbyist Teresa Tindal has recently joined Bassett in fighting for greater transparency about UFOs. They want nothing less than ‘full disclosure’ where the government admits to the extraterrestrial presence and the massive cover-up to hide the truth from the public. Says Bassett, “A significant percentage of all people on Capitol Hill are convinced there is an ET presence. They are just not able to speak to it publicly.”

• Tindal points out that polls show most people believe in ET life. “It is… the most powerful political initiative as it affects absolutely every aspect of life,” says Tindal. “[P]oliticians will be looking to control the issue.” There is even a Twitter hashtag #askthequestion that is meant to raise awareness of the disclosure process for the 2020 election.

• Bassett calls out the UFO lobbyist organization, ‘To the Stars Academy of Arts and Science’, headed by Tom DeLonge and Luis Elizondo as a limited disclosure effort, heeding certain conditions laid down by those still inside the government who are providing cover against those who would try to shut them down. Consequently, the ‘To The Stars’ team does not admit to the extraterrestrial presence. Obfuscating the existence of ET technology, Elizondo claims, “We simply don’t know at this point if non-human technology is even part of the equation.” DeLonge also publicly denies the extraterrestrial presence saying that humanity was visited by aliens in its distant past, and now all human culture is one big “cargo cult,” meaning that any ancient aliens are long gone.

• Another D.C. lobbyist is UFO researcher Chase Kloetzke who meets with lawmakers about “the phenomenon”. But she says that she can only get so far. UFOs are considered sensitive information. “It’s all classified. To be part of any discussion in D.C. about UAPs, you need a security clearance.” Says Kloetzke, “This topic is now in the hands of the Pentagon, military strategists and intelligence agencies.”

• But Kloetzke can confirm that the ‘To the Stars Academy’ is a key player in all of this, and that the Pentagon’s ‘Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program’, which studied UFOs until its purported termination in 2012, is “still in play.”

• Why is Kloetzke determined to lobby in D.C.? “I realized years ago that any kind of disclosure or confirmation will only be ‘official,’ if it comes from D.C.,” said Kloetzke. “We have unknown objects in our skies. Confirmed! … [W]e can now… start the process of public information.”

 

How do you make the government take UFOs seriously? With a UFO lobbyist, of course.

             Steven Bassett

In December 2017, the New York Times wrote about a de-funded secret Pentagon UFO program called AATIP, and revealed that several Navy pilots in 2004 and 2015 engaged in bizarre encounters with anomalous aerial objects off the coast of California and Florida. Eventually, three videos of “unidentified aerial phenomena” were released and have since been confirmed by the Navy as real.

For years, Steven Bassett was Capitol Hill’s lone UFO lobbyist. He became a registered lobbyist in 1996 and set up an advocacy organization, the Paradigm Research Group

                  Teresa Tindal

(PRG), which has the goal of using “all means possible to confront the United States government regarding its policy of a truth embargo on the events and evidence demonstrating an extraterrestrial presence engaging the human race and the formal acknowledgment of that presence,” according to Bassett’s website.

“It’s not about UFOs. The term is a product of government propaganda in service to the truth embargo and no longer of value,” Bassett told Motherboard. “It’s about extraterrestrials and the Disclosure process.”

                       Chase Kloetzke

For those not fully immersed in Ufological culture, “Disclosure” is the total and final admission by the government that extraterrestrials are not only visiting Earth, but that there is a massive government cover-up to hide the truth from the public. The UFO community has even taken to Twitter to raise awareness of the Disclosure process for the 2020 election with the hashtag #askthequestion.

“A significant percentage of all people on Capitol Hill are convinced there is an ET presence. They are just not able to speak to it—publicly,” Bassett said.

               Tom DeLonge

Bassett’s PRG organization has recently hired Teresa Tindal, another registered lobbyist who is now also fighting for greater transparency about UFOs. Like Bassett, Tindal is convinced that extraterrestrials are visiting Earth and interacting with humans. She believes that the government is complicit in a massive cover-up.

                          Luis Elizondo

“The cat’s out of the bag and politicians will be looking to control the issue,” Tindal told Motherboard. “It is, after all, the most powerful political initiative as it affects absolutely every aspect of life. Polls show most people believe in ET life.”

“We simply don’t know at this point if non-human technology is even part of the equation,” Elizondo stated. “It is a nonsensical assertion at this point in time because we simply need more data to even make that initial assessment.”

Elizondo’s boss, To the Star’s founder Tom DeLonge, has made his personal beliefs clear on the issue. In his book, Sekret Machines: Gods, co-written with Peter Levenda, DeLonge sums it all up by arguing that humanity was visited by aliens in its distant past, and that all human culture is one big “cargo cult.”

READ ENTIRE ARTICLE

 

FAIR USE NOTICE: This page contains copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. ExoNews.org distributes this material for the purpose of news reporting, educational research, comment and criticism, constituting Fair Use under 17 U.S.C § 107. Please contact the Editor at ExoNews with any copyright issue.

Tom DeLonge’s Graphic Novel ‘Strange Times’ Is Getting a TV Adaptation

by Katrina Nattress                    December 10, 2018                       (iheart.com)

• In 2015, Tom DeLonge combined his passions for skateboarding and UFO to create a graphic novel entitled Strange Times. On December 10th, the entertainment industry reporter Variety announced that the graphic novel is being adapted for a television series, with DeLonge producing along with writer Aaron Karo, Strike Entertainment’s Russell Binder, and the Cartel’s Stan Spry and Jeff Holland.

• The story focuses on five mystery-solving skateboarders who are constantly outrunning Deep State government agents. “My love for all things paranormal and skateboarding are sometimes only superseded by my love for offensive humor,” DeLonge said in a statement. “This series combines them all into one.”

• “This is exactly what my company To The Stars Academy of Arts and Science does,” said DeLonge. “All the stories and themes I work on are meant to be shared through multiple mediums and on different platforms — film, TV, books, music and so on.” “’Strange Times’ began as an interactive website where people shared weird, paranormal stories — a lot of them with credible evidence. That helped inspire the story behind the graphic novel and also a prose novel that I published.”

[Editor’s Note]   Stand by for Corey Goode’s long-anticipated graphic novel, due for release in February 2019.

 

Though Tom DeLonge is still a beloved musician, the former blink-182 guitarist/singer has been focusing a lot of his energy on other endeavors. He just published a new children’s book and has been busy researching UFOs. In 2015, he combined both passions and published a graphic novel called Strange Times. Now, that project is getting a TV adaptation.

On Monday (December 10), Variety announced that the series is currently in development at TBS. The story focuses on five mystery-solving skateboarders who are constantly outrunning Deep State government agents. “My love for all things paranormal and skateboarding are sometimes only superseded by my love for offensive humor,” DeLonge said in a statement. “This series combines them all into one.”

The rockstar expanded on his creative vision in an interview with Variety.

“This is a dream I’ve had for over 10 years and it’s finally a reality,” he gushed. “All the stories and themes I work on are meant to be shared through multiple mediums and on different platforms — film, TV, books, music and so on. ‘Strange Times’ began as an interactive website where people shared weird, paranormal stories — a lot of them with credible evidence. That helped inspire the story behind the graphic novel and also a prose novel that I published.”

“This is exactly what my company To The Stars Academy of Arts and Science does,” he continued. “We hope to create something that could be described as sort of a ‘science fiction Disney,’ where our entertainment franchises are worlds that are inspired and informed by our own next-generation science division.”

DeLonge is set to executive produce the series with writer Aaron Karo, Strike Entertainment’s Russell Binder and the Cartel’s Stan Spry and Jeff Holland.

READ ORIGINAL ARTICLE

 

FAIR USE NOTICE: This page contains copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. ExoNews.org distributes this material for the purpose of news reporting, educational research, comment and criticism, constituting Fair Use under 17 U.S.C § 107. Please contact the Editor at ExoNews with any copyright issue.

Do Aliens Exist? Blink 182 Co-Founder and Ex-Pentagon Official Are Determined to Prove We’re Not Alone

by Keith Kloor                    September 20, 2018                       (newsweek.com)

• On July 29th, Luis Elizondo, the former career military intelligence official in charge of the Pentagon’s UFO research program from 2007 to 2012 and current member of rock star Tom DeLonge’s ‘To The Stars Academy’, spoke at the annual Mutual UFO Network (MUFON) Symposium at the Crowne Plaza hotel in Cherry Hill, New Jersey.

• Elizondo’s background is typical of a straight-arrow military officer with a distinguished career. He is the son of a Cuban exile who participated in the Bay of Pigs in 1961. Elizondo worked as a bouncer while attending the University of Miami. After graduating in 1995, he joined the Army and trained to be a military spy. Later, at the Pentagon, Elizondo showed no sign of being a disgruntled employee, spending much of his career chasing militants in South America and the Middle East.

• In 2010, Elizondo was made the head of a small group within the Pentagon charged with investigating reports of “unexplained aerial phenomena” – a less controversial term for UFOs. It was an ¬obscure, low-budget initiative created in 2007 at the behest of then-Senator Harry Reid of Nevada, and operated jointly by Elizondo and Robert Bigelow of Bigelow Aerospace. But the results of their UFO investigations made Elizondo a true believer. Although the Pentagon program was officially shut down in 2012, Elizondo insists it remains ongoing.

• Elizondo resigned from the Pentagon in October 2017 protesting what he considered lackluster support and unnecessary secrecy. “Why aren’t we spending more time and effort on this (UFO) issue?” Elizondo wrote to Defense Secretary James Mattis in his resignation letter, “Despite overwhelming evidence at both the classified and unclassified levels, certain individuals in the Department (of Defense) remain staunchly opposed to further research on what could be a tactical threat to our pilots, sailors, and soldiers, and perhaps even an existential threat to our national security.”

• When Tom DeLonge launched ‘To the Stars Academy of Arts and Science’ in October 2017, Elizondo joined and quickly became its public face. Its mission: to advance UFO research, produce science-fiction-themed entertainment about UFOs and, with luck, glean some insight into the super-advanced technology displayed by UFOs (such as spaceships that can seemingly defy gravity) that the Pentagon keeps ignoring. Over the past year, the Academy claims to have attracted more than 2,000 investors and raised roughly $2.5 million.

• ‘To The Stars Academy’ also boasts such heavy-hitters as Chris Mellon, the former deputy ¬assistant secretary of defense for intelligence during the Clinton and George W. Bush administrations who had oversight of the Pentagon’s super-¬secret ‘special access programs’ and highly classified ‘black operations’; Jim Semivan, a 25-year veteran of the CIA’s National Clandestine Service; and Hal Puthoff an electrical engineer who conducted controversial research on psychic abilities for the CIA and the DIA.

• The $22 million Pentagon UFO project marked the first time that the U.S. government admitted to studying UFOs since the Air Force’s ‘Project Blue Book’ was shut down in 1968. Despite Senator Reid’s assertion in an interview with New York magazine that “we have hundreds and ¬hundreds of papers… 80 percent at least, is public,” and Mellon’s statement in Washington Post op-ed, that referred to a “growing body of empirical data,” Elizondo says that much of these “large volumes” of academic studies and data are “FOIA-exempt,” meaning the public is not given access to them.

• There are those in the UFO community who are skeptical of DeLonge’s motives. They believe he simply wants to profit off his UFO-related books, websites and merchandise, and that his antics are part of the business plan.

• As the Academy’s head of Global Security and Special Programs, Elizondo serves as a liaison to the government, including Congress, the Pentagon and the intelligence services. Elizondo thinks that the next six months or so will be pivotal to the success of ‘To the Stars’ when he expects to be able to present more data on UFO sightings. “I’m not worried about credibility,” Elizondo says. “I’m worried about facts.” Reminded that the only facts the public has now are grainy videos, he insists, “There is data. It’s not out yet.”

• Elizondo understands why many remain dubious. “I get it. I’m a career spy,” he says.” “No, I am not running a government disinformation campaign.” “I took a huge risk in leaving a safe job to do this. If this doesn’t pan out, I’ll be working at Walmart.” “But…as crazy as it sounds, this is real.”

 

“I know what I saw.”

It was late July, and Teresa Tindal, a 39-year-old administrator for a consulting firm, was describing the incident that made her a believer: a round, golden object hovering in the evening sky over Tucson, Arizona. Weather balloon? No way. It could only be one thing: a UFO.

This kind of certainty had brought her—and 400 other people—to the Crowne Plaza hotel in Cherry Hill, New Jersey, for the Mutual UFO Network (MUFON) Symposium, the “premiere UFO event of the year,” according to its literature. They had gathered to talk about extraterrestrials, UFOs and how to avoid being abducted by an alien mothership (hint: yelling at it doesn’t work). “There are too many people that have seen things,” Christine Thisse, 44, a soft-spoken mother from Michigan, told Newsweek.

There were the typical guest speakers giving talks with titles like “Unexplained Disappearances in Rural Areas” and “Report From Mars,” in which a physicist lays out his theory that 75,000 years ago an intergalactic nuclear war wiped out a Martian civilization. And there were famous abductees, like Travis Walton, a former logger whose story of alien captivity became the 1993 movie Fire in the Sky.

But this year offered another attraction—a new, and extremely unlikely, superstar: Luis Elizondo. Seven months earlier, The New York Times had published a front-page story on the Advanced Aviation Threat Identification Program, a “shadowy” initiative at the Pentagon that “investigated reports of unidentified flying objects.” Elizondo, a burly Miami native with a billy-goat beard and colorful tattoos, was the career military intelligence official put in charge of the program a few years after it formed in 2007, until, according to the Pentagon’s press office, it was discontinued in 2012. (Elizondo insists the work is ongoing.) Last year, he resigned from the Pentagon, protesting what he considered lackluster support and unnecessary secrecy—red meat for the X-Files crowd. “Why aren’t we spending more time and effort on this issue?” he wrote to Defense Secretary James Mattis in his resignation letter.

In the private sector, Elizondo soon found an unlikely ally in his quest for the truth: Tom DeLonge, the former frontman for the pop/punk band Blink-182, the group behind a song called “Aliens Exist.” Turns out DeLonge actually believed it. In 2017, he launched To the Stars Academy of Arts and Science, and Elizondo quickly became its public face. The mission: to advance UFO research, produce science-fiction-themed entertainment about UFOs and, with luck, glean some insight into the super-advanced technology displayed by UFOs (such as spaceships that can seemingly defy gravity) that the Pentagon keeps ignoring.

The academy claims to have attracted more than 2,000 investors and raised roughly $2.5 million, and Elizondo found a mostly enthusiastic crowd in Cherry Hill. “Sometimes people may have associated you with being fringe—being out there,” he told the MUFON audience over a buffet dinner. “All along, you were right.” Not everyone was convinced: Some cited a lack of evidence in his presentation. Tindal was suspicious of the Pentagon connection. “It could be a cover for something else,” she said.

But if Elizondo is trying to lend credibility to research on unexplained sightings, why would he partner with a guy whose band had a hit album titled Enema of the State? And why would he choose as a venue a UFO conference teeming with conspiracy theorists?

“We have to start somewhere,” he told Newsweek that day. “I don’t get invited to Stanford or MIT.”

Super Hornets and Tic Tacs

Each year, thousands of people report UFO sightings to various authorities—the police, the Pentagon, radio talk show hosts. By one count, more than 100,000 sightings have been reported since 1905. Nearly all can be explained away as clouds, meteors, birds, weather balloons or some other quotidian phenomenon. Efforts at rational debunking serve only to harden the conviction of the true believers, who are convinced that abundant evidence of alien visitations is hidden in secret military documents—literal X-files—locked away in the bowels of the so-called deep state.

The X-files conspiracy theory is the beating heart of the UFO community—an article of faith among enthusiasts and the basis of almost every call to action on social media (#Disclosure). It is also encouraged by some prominent people, including John ¬Podesta, who lamented on Twitter a few years ago that he’d failed to secure the #disclosure of the UFO files, “despite being President Bill Clinton’s chief of staff.

When Elizondo went public, it gave a sheen of credibility to the conspiracy crowd. His background is typical of a straight-arrow military officer with a distinguished career. He is the son of a Cuban exile who participated in the Bay of Pigs—the failed CIA-¬sponsored plot to overthrow Fidel Castro in 1961. Elizondo worked as a bouncer while attending the University of Miami. After graduating in 1995, he joined the Army and trained to be a military spy. Later, at the Pentagon, Elizondo showed no sign of being a disgruntled employee or a loon, spending much of his career in the shadows, chasing militants in South America and the Middle East.

In 2010, he started to run a small group charged with investigating reports of “unexplained aerial phenomena”—a less controversial term for UFOs. It was an ¬obscure, low-budget initiative created three years before at the behest of then-Senator Harry Reid of Nevada. Details are murky, but the $22 million program seems to have been operated jointly by Elizondo and Bigelow Aerospace, a Nevada-based defense contractor whose billionaire owner, Robert Bigelow, is an avid believer in UFOs.

Two months before the Times published its front-page story, Elizondo retired from the Pentagon. He shows Newsweek what he says is a copy of his resignation letter, dated October 4, 2017, and addressed to Mattis. The letter expresses some frustration about the lack of attention his program was getting. And it suggests that something he learned at the Pentagon turned him into a true believer. “Despite overwhelming evidence at both the classified and unclassified levels,” he wrote, “certain individuals in the Department remain staunchly opposed to further research on what could be a tactical threat to our pilots, sailors, and soldiers, and perhaps even an existential threat to our national security.”

READ ENTIRE ARTICLE

 

FAIR USE NOTICE: This page contains copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. ExoNews.org distributes this material for the purpose of news reporting, educational research, comment and criticism, constituting Fair Use under 17 U.S.C § 107. Please contact the Editor at ExoNews with any copyright issue.

  • 1
  • 2

Copyright © 2019 Exopolitics Institute News Service. All Rights Reserved.