Tag: The Beatles

John Lennon: Beatles Star’s Ex Reveals Truth About UFO Sighting ‘I Know What I Saw’

 

Article by Minnie Wright                        January 24, 2020                          (express.co.uk)

• In (August)1974, John Lennon was gazing out of the apartment window of the Manhattan apartment he shared with May Pang, “just daydreaming around in my usual poetic frame of mind”, when he saw a UFO hovering around 100 feet away over a nearby building. He and May went out to the terrace and saw a large, circular object coming toward them.  (John and May are pictured above)

• May Pang describes the UFO as “… shaped like a flattened cone, and on top was a large, brilliant red light, not pulsating as on any of the aircraft we’d see heading for a landing at Newark Airport. …When it came a little closer, we could make out a row or circle of white lines that ran around the entire rim of the craft. These were also flashing on and off. …There were so many of these lights that it was dazzling to the mind.”

• Lennon later referenced the UFO sighting in the lyrics of his song ‘Nobody Told Me’ (there’d be days like these): “There’s UFOs over New York / And I ain’t too surprised.”  (see below)

• Pang has opened up on the experience in interviews (listen to May Pang’s interview below discussing the UFO sighting). In an interview with The Beatles Bible, May declared, “I know what I saw. And the rational explanation is… it was a UFO.” May claimed that 400 fellow New Yorkers reported seeing the UFO in 1974. But also she saw another UFO in the early 80’s, along with other people.

• Whether Lennon had called out to the UFO in the hope it might take him away, Pang clarified the rumor: “He didn’t call out to it; he later said he wished it had taken us with it. …However, I doubt we’d have been that enthusiastic to go along had the opportunity actually presented itself.”

• Lennon tried to take pictures of the UFO with both a polaroid and regular camera but said the film came back blank, like it had “been through the radar at customs”. His photographer Bob Gruen, called the Daily News and the Times the next day, as well as the police, to see if anyone else had reported a sighting. “[O]ther people and/or groups said they too saw something,” Lennon said. “Anyway, I know what I saw…”

 

John Lennon remains one of Britain’s most acclaimed musicians to this day thanks to his contributions both with The Beatles and as a solo artist. Famously shunning the mainstream for the experimental after meeting and falling in love with avant-garde artist Yoko Ono, he went on to leave the band and also turned his attention to peace activism.

            May Pang

A few short years into his marriage to Ono, however, Lennon embarked on a romance with their assistant, May Pang.

Ono knew about the affair, during which her famous husband moved out of their New York home and to Los Angeles with Pang, later saying it “wasn’t hurtful” to her.

       Lennon’s sketch of the UFO

While he was with Pang, at a time they were in New York, The Beatles star claimed to have seen a UFO, even referencing the moment in the liner notes for Walls and Bridges and in his song Nobody Told Me, in which he sings: “There’s UFOs over New York / And I ain’t too surprised.”

In a rare interview with The Beatles Bible years later in 2011, Pang opened up on the experience, revealing what she thought to be the truth of the matter.

“I know what I saw. And the rational explanation is… it was a UFO,” she declared.

“There’s UFOs over New York, as the song goes. And I saw another one in the early ‘80s, and I know other did people did too.”

Asked if anyone else in the city spotted the object that day in 1974, Lennon’s ex replied: “Yes, that event had about 400 reported sightings, I believe.”

On the subject of whether or not Lennon had, in fact, called out to the UFO in the hope it might take him away, Pang clarified: “He didn’t call out to it; he later said he wished it had taken us with it.

 

3:35 minute “Nobody Told Me” song by John Lennon (‘johnlennon’ YouTube)

 

55:33 minute May Pang interview: describes seeing UFO at 34:20-43:00 (‘The Moore Show’ YouTube)

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Hello From Earth: Australia’s First Interstellar Message

Listen to “e172 Hello From Earth: Australia’s First Interstellar Message” on Spreaker.

Article by Wilson da Silva                        November 13, 2019                         (abc.net.au)

• A decade ago, the organizers of Australia’s National Science Week wanted to promote its annual ten day event and they dreamed up the project called ‘Hello From Earth’. The project would be a “Twitter to the stars” where they would collect short personal messages from the public, package them into a single transmission, and send them to the nearest habitable planet beyond our solar system. Now, ten years since the NASA transmission of these goodwill messages, they have passed the halfway mark on their long journey through the cosmos.

• The ‘Hello From Earth’ organizers chose as its communication target a “super-Earth” orbiting the habitable zone of its parent star 20.4 light-years away known as Gliese 581d. The interstellar Tweet was scheduled for August 28, 2009, utilizing three facilities within NASA’s Deep Space Network that together represented the largest and most sensitive scientific telecommunications system in the world. They included a transmission facility near Madrid, Spain, another in Barstow, California, and the Canberra Deep Space Communication Complex in Australia. The transmission was repeated twice over two hours with a combined power of over 300 billion mobile phones at once.

• “[T]here’s no statute covering interstellar messages, and no-one has jurisdiction over transmissions,” said Paul Davies of Arizona State University who also chaired SETI’s Post-Detection Subcommittee. While there is no permission required to transmit an interstellar message, responding to an extraterrestrial signal requires the approval of the SETI Subcommittee. But even the transmission of signals into space will upset some people who consider it unwise and potentially catastrophic to invite an alien invasion. As humans have been inadvertently transmitting signals into space since the 1930s from television broadcasts to military radar, most scientists don’t object to interstellar texting. Technologically advanced extraterrestrials would already know we’re here.

• In 1974, the Arecibo Radio Telescope in Puerto Rico was the first to intentionally broadcast an interstellar message to a star 25,000 light years away. There have been 31 such messages sent out to the cosmos. One was sent in 2008 from the facility outside of Madrid to commemorate the 50th anniversary of NASA. It also happened to be the 40th anniversary of the recording of the Beatles song, “Across the Universe”. Hence it was selected for transmission — with approval from Paul McCartney, Yoko Ono, and Apple Records. The song was transmitted to Polaris, “the North Star” 431 light years away.

• NASA approved the ‘Hello from Earth’ proposal just eight days before the start of National Science Week. Organizers quickly built a website and invited people to offer messages for transmission. Australia’s science minister, Kim Carr, submitted the first message: “Hello from Australia on the planet we call Earth. These messages express our people’s dreams for the future. We want to share those dreams with you.” The website was bombarded with visitors from all over the world. In all, 25,880 messages were encoded into a binary signal at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California and sent into space. (See a sampling of the messages below)

• NASA insisted on a very high level of decorum in the cosmic messages: nothing remotely suggestive, no risque humor or anything aggressive. When, in 1973, NASA sent a plaque with the Pioneer 10 and Pioneer 11 space probes, it included an illustration of a naked man and woman. NASA received complaints from members of US Congress, and newspapers ran letters objecting to NASA “exporting pornography to the stars”.

• It’s mind-boggling that we sent goodwill messages from a random selection of humans to a potentially habitable planet that might have a technical civilization. The chance that the messages reach an intelligent civilization on the distant exoplanet is highly unlikely, but it’s not zero. If a reply does come, it will arrive decades from now.

• What would you say to an alien civilization on an Earth-like planet far, far away? Here are some of the messages that were sent in August of 2009:

– “Greetings from a girl on Earth who, every so often, looks up at the night sky and waves hello in the hope that someone on another planet is doing the same.” – Sophie of Longmont, Colorado

– “If you come to Earth, look into: music, the beach, ice cream, hugs, family, love, dancing, cheese, trampolines, friendship, books and dreams. Just for a start.” – Tamasin, Richmond, Australia

– “If someone is reading this, I hope that our children will someday have the privilege of meeting one another.” — Tegan Larsen, San Antonio, United States

– “What do you see when you look up into the sky? Do you feel small and lonely, just like us? From now on, I can assure you one thing: you are not alone. Be happy.” – Sergio Camalich, Hermosillo, Mexico

– “Hello Baba, if you are out there I love you and hope you are watching me. I wonder if when you died you went to this planet.” — Liam Oliver, Coogee, Australia

– “All our petty disputes, disagreements and wars fade into insignificance when we consider our tiny world’s place in the cosmos.” — Silvio Zarb, Melbourne, Australia

– “There is only one thing bigger than this vast universe, the desire to discover. I hope I discovered you.” — T.S.M., Skopje, Macedonia

– “My aim of contacting you is to seek your assistance in transferring the sum of thirty-five million US dollars out of Nigeria and into your trusted bank account abroad.” – Hapatikiatwengo, Australia

– “Hi there. Sorry about the Outer Limits; hope you enjoyed I Love Lucy. Have you got all our missing socks? Love, Earth.” — Fred Mason, Roberts Creek, Australia

 

What would you say to an alien civilisation on an Earth-like planet far, far away?

“Greetings from a girl on Earth who, every so often, looks up at the night sky and waves hello in the hope that someone on another planet is doing the same.”

This message from Sophie of Longmont, Colorado, in the United States, is just one of almost 26,000 sent from Australia to an Earth-like planet 20 light-years away.

It’s been a decade since NASA transmitted these goodwill messages, and this week the transmission passed the halfway mark on its long, lonely journey through the silent cosmos.

The project, called Hello from Earth, began as a science communication campaign to get people excited about Australia’s National Science Week.

Those of us running the annual 10-day event were looking for an idea that would create a buzz on social media.

We decided on a kind of “Twitter to the stars”. We would collect short messages from the public and transmit them to the nearest habitable planet beyond our solar system.

Each message would be short, later packaged into a single transmission and sent using one of NASA’s facilities.

Our target was Gliese 581d, a “super-Earth” orbiting the habitable zone of its parent star.

First detected in 2007, studies in 2009 suggested it could have large oceans.

And since it was 20.4 light-years away, it would help give people a real appreciation of just how big the universe is.

“If you come to Earth, look into: music, the beach, ice cream, hugs, family, love, dancing, cheese, trampolines, friendship, books and dreams. Just for a start.” — Tamasin, Richmond, Australia

‘It might trigger an invasion’

When I suggested the idea, the bureaucrats involved with National Science Week were intrigued, if a little sceptical, but asked me to explore it.

                          Paul Davies

In the months that followed, I had conversations with sometimes quizzical senior CSIRO staff, leading astronomers and US government officials, negotiating terms and agreeing to specifications.

Surprisingly, we didn’t need approval to transmit an interstellar message — but we would have if we wanted to respond to an extraterrestrial signal.

You can understand why: if an extraterrestrial signal is received, you can’t have everyone with a high-gain antenna answering back.

So who speaks for Earth? That turned out to be the SETI Post-Detection Subcommittee, which at the time was chaired by astronomer Paul Davies of Arizona State University, an old friend and former colleague.

“What do you think?” I asked in an overnight phone call after explaining Hello from Earth.

“Will we breach any unwritten rules in the scientific community?”

“Well, there’s no statute covering interstellar messages, and no-one has jurisdiction over transmissions,” Davies said from his home in Tempe, Arizona.

“But it will upset some people.”

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Out-of-this-World Collection of John Lennon’s Drawings and Sci-Fi Magazines

February 28, 2019                     (finebooksmagazine.com)

• John Lennon’s fascination with aliens and UFOs has been well documented throughout his life. As a member of The Beatles, Lennon often talked about his belief in alien life and even wrote about it. On March 30, 2019, Kruse GWS Auctions (Los Angeles) will offer an extraordinary collection of John Lennon’s personal drawings and Sci-Fi magazines, long collected by an old friend who shared his passion.

• On July 6, 1957, a fellow Liverpoolian befriended Lennon when he was performing as part of the Quarrymen in Woolten Village in Liverpool. The (anonymous) young man shared a fascination with space and would strike up a conversation with John who was looking through a UFO magazine. From there on, the friendship would continue on for decades, and John and the gentleman exchanged letters, drawings, opinions, and magazines about UFOs, space and all things extraterrestrial. During this time, John Lennon would send his new friend drawings and some of his personal science fiction books and magazines, all of which was kept throughout the gentlemen’s life and even after Lennon moved to the U.S. The drawings and magazines to be auctioned for the very first time are now being offered by the man’s stepson who has also chronicled the story of the unlikely friendship.

• There are four drawings done in crayon and pencil (see images above and below) and date to the 1950s and early 1960s, along with the collection of personal sci-fi books and magazines. Two of the pieces being offered are in red crayon, early examples of his characteristic line drawings. One appears to be someone smoking a marijuana joint, while the back side features a character possessing an excessively large nose and sad face. The other captures two inversed smiling faces, a kind of yin and yang, staring at each other. The other two drawings are done in pencil, with a UFO flying above his wife Cynthia’s head and the word “Cyn” on it and John’s initials ‘JL’ , and John’s full initials of ‘JWL’ (John Winston Lennon) incorporated into the illustrations. Each drawing will be accompanied by a copy of the letter received from the stepson describing the two’s lifelong friendship. The drawings will be offered in museum quality glass and frames and sold individually, and the sci-fi collection will be sold in one lot. The crayon drawings measure 4.5″ x 3″ and 4″ x 3.25″ and the pencil pieces are 8.5″ x 6″ and 5.5″ x 3.5.”

• Lennon’s fixation on ET visits and claims of alien abduction culminated in his most infamous sighting, when he saw a UFO from his balcony fly over the East River on August 23, 1974. John and his lover May Pang (during his separation from Yoko) were living in an apartment overlooking New York’s East River, when John saw what he described as a UFO. Lennon went on to describe it along with its path and May Pang has been noted as saying John screamed out the window “wait – take me with you.”

 

Los Angeles – John Lennon’s fascination with aliens and UFOs has been well documented throughout his life. As a member of one of the most famous bands of all time, The Beatles, Lennon often talked about his belief in alien life and even wrote about it. From his earlier years with wife Cynthia to his sighting in New York over the East River in 1974, the Beatles member continued to be mesmerized with life in space, even as much as to cite visitations from aliens when he was with Yoko Ono. On March 30, 2019, Kruse GWS Auctions will offer an extraordinary collection of John Lennon’s personal drawings and Sci-Fi magazines, long collected by an old friend who shared his passion.

On July 6, 1957, a fellow Liverpoolian befriended Lennon when he was performing as part of the Quarrymen, the group that eventually evolved into The Beatles. The band appeared in Woolten Village in Liverpool.

The young man shared a fascination with space and would strike up a conversation with John who was looking through a UFO magazine. From there on, the friendship would continue on for decades and John and the gentleman exchanged letters, drawings, opinions, and magazines about UFOs, space and all things extraterrestrial. During this time, John Lennon would send his new friend drawings and some of his personal science fiction books and magazines, all of which was kept throughout the gentlemen’s life and even after Lennon moved to the U.S. The drawings and magazines to be auctioned for the very first time are now being offered by the man’s stepson who has also chronicled the story of the unlikely friendship.

John Lennon on the balcony where he saw a UFO in 1974

There are four drawings done in crayon and pencil and date to the 1950s and early 1960s. The drawings along with the collection of personal sci-fi books and magazines represent a passion of a member of the world’s most famous band – The Beatles.

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FAIR USE NOTICE: This page contains copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. ExoNews.org distributes this material for the purpose of news reporting, educational research, comment and criticism, constituting Fair Use under 17 U.S.C § 107. Please contact the Editor at ExoNews with any copyright issue.

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