Tag: swamp gas

Dexter’s UFO Incident and Hysteria

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Article by Doug Marrin                     October 15, 2019                     (thesuntimesnews.com)

• In the late evening of March 20, 1966, Frank Mannor and his son Ronald watched a pyramid-shaped UFO craft hover over their farm in Dexter, Michigan. The body of the craft was a porous-looking yellowish rock. Frank described a blue-green light on the right side of it, and a white light on the left side. No antenna or porthole. “We got to about 500 yards of the thing,” Mannor told reporters. “You couldn’t see it too good because it was surrounded with heat waves, like you see on the desert.”

• The Washtenaw County Sheriff’s report listed up to 60 witnesses that watched the UFO for a half hour, including 12 policemen, from a distance of only 1,500 feet. The consensus described it as a brown luminous car-sized object with a “scaly” or “waffled” surface, cone-shaped on top and flat or oval on the bottom. It had two bluish-green lights on right and left edges that turned bright red to illuminate the object.

• At one point the whole object lit up with a yellowish glow while rising 500 ft, and then descended again. When the witnesses saw a couple of flashlights in the distance, the object seemed to respond by flying away at high speed directly over the witnesses with a whistling sound like a rifle bullet ricocheting.

• The press pounced on the story and suddenly there were sightings throughout the Midwestern states with UFO reports as far away as Kansas. Dismissed at first as a hoax or mass delusion, the government finally sent in Dr. J Allen Hynek, an astronomer from Northwestern University to investigate the matter. Hynek arrived in Dexter and found what he later described as “near hysteria.”

• The mid-1960s were the days of black and white television shows such as “Lost in Space” and “My Favorite Martian”, and movies like “Invasion of the Body Snatchers” and “The Day the Earth Stood Still”. The public had been primed for this moment. UFO and alien mania were sweeping across the country. At nearby University of Michigan students laughed it off and played alien pranks.

• Doug Harvey, who was the Washtenaw County Sheriff at the time, recalls Hynek coming the sheriff’s office to introduce himself. Hynek told him, “’I’m from Washington and I’ve come down (here) to inspect that site about the UFO.’ So I drove him out there and he looked at it and talked to the Mannors. He got back in the car and I said, ‘What do you think?’ He said, ‘You know, I really don’t know. I really don’t know. Something was there.’”

• Sheriff Harvey says that, “As soon as we got back to the jail, (Hynek) had a call from Washington.” Hynek then used Harvey’s office to address the press. Hynek announced, “We have definitely discovered that it was swamp gas.” “And that’s where it died,” says Harvey. Everybody went home.

• Of the 78 UFO sightings reported in Michigan to the National UFO Reporting Center so far in 2019, one was in Dexter. In the late evening of August 1, 2019, a Dexter resident reported seeing a bright and pulsing amber light hovering above his garage for a few minutes. It also had two smaller blinking red lights. “It was too big to be a plane,” said the witness. Then it suddenly took off over (his) house and into the distance, making a sound similar to a low-flying plane. “[B]ut it was very much not a plane.”

• There are more sightings reported now than ever before, but the public has been desensitized to it. We’ve been hearing stories of UFO encounters for seventy years. At some point you give up and move on. People aren’t frightened of UFOs. It is simply that nobody takes them seriously or gives them a second thought unless it is especially compelling. We’ve traded hysteria for ambivalence.

 

There was a UFO incident in Dexter in 1966 that sparked a national panic over an imminent alien invasion. The event was the climax of a hysteria that had been mounting for decades. Once over, fear of UFOs faded, making room for other national worries. However, UFO sightings continue to this day in Washtenaw County and around the state, but nobody gives them a second thought or even a first.

“We got a call that the Mannors out in Dexter seen a UFO,” says Doug Harvey who was the Washtenaw County Sheriff at the time. “So I went out there and the grass was down flat in a round circle…and they said they definitely seen an object come down and lift off.”

UFO hysteria first began in the late 1940s. It coincided and was quite probably fueled by the start of the Cold War and its paranoia as well as the emergence of the Golden Age of Television and its entertainment. By the mid-1960s, the collective American imagination was fertile for end-of-the-world scenarios, either manmade or alien.

But what has happened since then? Fifty years later, we’re not scared anymore. And except for a few over-cooked and half-baked UFOlogists storming Area 51 in the Nevada desert, we’re not taking the idea of visiting extraterrestrials seriously anymore. The whole idea is a thing of fiction, for entertainment purposes only.

Dexter’s UFO incident

It all started out of nowhere late one evening in 1966. Right at the moment when the earth was at its Spring Equinox as if in response to the University of Michigan’s advanced radio telescope probing space the final frontier on nearby Peach Mountain, strange but colorful lights suddenly appeared over a family farm in Dexter Township.

The owner, Frank Mannor, along with his son Ronald, ran after the strange, hovering craft over his wooded swamp. Oh to have been there with a smartphone.

“We got to about 500 yards of the thing,” Frank later told reporters. “It was sort of shaped like a pyramid, with a blue-green light on the right-hand side and on the left, a white light. I didn’t see no antenna or porthole. The body was like a yellowish coral rock and looked like it had holes in it—sort of like if you took a piece of cardboard box and split it open. You couldn’t see it too good because it was surrounded with heat waves, like you see on the desert. The white light turned to a blood red as we got close to it and Ron (his son) said, ‘Look at that horrible thing.’”

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Meet J. Allen Hynek, the Astronomer Who First Classified UFO ‘Close Encounters’

by Greg Daugherty                      November 19, 2018                      (history.com)

• In 1947, a rash of reports of UFOs had the public on edge. The Air Force created Project Sign to investigate these UFO sightings. But they needed outside expertise to sift through the reports and come up with explanations for all of these sightings. Enter J. Allen Hynek.

• In 1948, Hynek was the 37-year-old director at Ohio State University’s McMillin Observatory. He had worked for the government during WWII developing new defense technologies for the war effort with a high security clearance. The Air Force approached him to be a consultant on ‘flying saucers’ for the government. “I had scarcely heard of UFOs in 1948 and, like every other scientist I knew, assumed that they were nonsense,” Hynek recalled.

• Hynek’s UFO investigations under Project Sign resulted in twenty percent of the 237 cases that couldn’t be explained. In February 1949, Project Sign was succeeded by Project Grudge, which said Hynek, “took as its premise that UFOs simply could not be.” The 1949 Grudge report concluded that the phenomena posed no danger to the United States, and warranted no further study.

• But UFO incidents continued, even from the Air Force’s own radar operators. The national media began treating the phenomenon more seriously. The Air Force had little choice but to revive Project Grudge under a new name: Project Blue Book. Hynek joined Project Blue Book in 1952 and would remain with it until its demise in 1969. But he had changed his mind about the existence of UFOs. “The witnesses I interviewed could have been lying, could have been insane or could have been hallucinating collectively—but I do not think so,” he recalled in 1977. Hynek deplored the ridicule that people who reported a UFO sighting often had to endure, causing untold numbers of others to never come forward, not to mention the loss of useful research data.

• “Given the controversial nature of the subject, it’s understandable that both scientists and witnesses are reluctant to come forward,” said Jacques Vallee, co-author with Dr. Hynek of The Edge of Reality: A Progress Report on Unidentified Flying Objects.

• On October 4, 1957, the Soviet Union surprised the world by launching Sputnik, a serious blow to Americans’ sense of technological superiority. Hynek was on TV assuring Americans that their scientists were closely monitoring the situation. UFO sightings continued unabated.

• In the 1960s, Hynek was the top expert on UFOs as scientific consultant to Project Blue Book. But he chafed at what he perceived as the project’s mandate to debunk UFO sightings, and the inadequate resources at his disposal. Air Force Major Hector Quintanilla, who headed the project from 1963 to 1969, writes that he considered Hynek a “liability.”

• Hynek frustrated UFO debunkers such as the U.S. Air Force. But in 1966, after suggesting that a UFO sighting in Michigan may have been an optical illusion created by swamp gas, he became a punchline for UFO believers as well.

• In his testimony for a Congressional hearing in 1966, Hynek stated, “[I]t is my opinion that the body of data accumulated since 1948…deserves close scrutiny by a civilian panel of physical and social scientists…”. The Air Force established a civilian committee of scientists to investigate UFOs, chaired by physicist, Dr. Edward U. Condon. In 1968, Hynek assailed the Condon Report’s conclusion that “further extensive study of UFOs probably cannot be justified.” In 1969, Project Blue Book shut down for good.

• UFO sightings continued around the world. Hynek later quipped, “apparently [they] did not read the Condon Report”. Hynek went on with his research, free from the compromises and bullying of the U.S. Air Force.

• In 1972, Hynek published his first book, The UFO Experience. It introduced Hynek’s classifications of UFO incidents, which he called Close Encounters. Close Encounters of the First Kind meant UFOs seen at a close enough range to make out some details. In a Close Encounter of the Second Kind, the UFO had a physical effect, such as scorching trees, frightening animals or causing car motors to suddenly conk out. In Close Encounters of the Third Kind, witnesses reported seeing occupants in or near a UFO.

• In 1977, Steven Spielberg released the movie, Close Encounters of the Third Kind. Hynek was paid $1,000 for the use of the title, another $1,000 for the rights to use stories from the book and $1,500 for three days of technical consulting. He also had a brief cameo in the film, playing an awestruck scientist when the alien spacecraft comes into view.

• In 1978, Hynek retired from teaching. In 1973 he had founded the Center for UFO Studies which continues to this day. Hynek died in 1986, at age 75, from a brain tumor.

 

It’s September 1947, and the U.S. Air Force has a problem. A rash of reports about mysterious objects in the skies has the public on edge and the military baffled. The Air Force needs to figure out what’s going on—and fast. It launches an investigation it calls Project Sign.

By early 1948 the team realizes it needs some outside expertise to sift through the reports it’s receiving—specifically an astronomer who can determine which cases are easily explained by astronomical phenomena, such as planets, stars or meteors.

For J. Allen Hynek, then the 37-year-old director at Ohio State University’s McMillin Observatory, it would be a classic case of being in the right place at the right time—or, as he may have occasionally lamented, the wrong place at the wrong one.

The adventure begins

Hynek had worked for the government during the war, developing new defense technologies like the first radio-controlled fuse, so he already had a high security clearance and was a natural go-to.

“One day I had a visit from several men from the technical center at Wright-Patterson Air Force base, which was only 60 miles away in Dayton,” Hynek later wrote. “With some obvious embarrassment, the men eventually brought up the subject of ‘flying saucers’ and asked me if I would care to serve as consultant to the Air Force on the matter… The job didn’t seem as though it would take too much time, so I agreed.”

Little did Hynek realize that he was about to begin a lifelong odyssey that would make him one of the most famous and, at times, controversial scientists of the 20 century. Nor could he have guessed how much his own thinking about UFOs would change over that period as he persisted in bringing rigorous scientific inquiry to the subject.

“I had scarcely heard of UFOs in 1948 and, like every other scientist I knew, assumed that they were nonsense,” he recalled.

Project Sign ran for a year, during which the team reviewed 237 cases. In Hynek’s final report, he noted that about 32 percent of incidents could be attributed to astronomical phenomena, while another 35 percent had other explanations, such as balloons, rockets, flares or birds. Of the remaining 33 percent, 13 percent didn’t offer enough evidence to yield an explanation. That left 20 percent that provided investigators with some evidence but still couldn’t be explained.

The Air Force was loath to use the term “unidentified flying object,” so the mysterious 20 percent were simply classified as “unidentified.”

In February 1949, Project Sign was succeeded by Project Grudge. While Sign offered at least a pretense of scientific objectivity, Grudge seems to have been dismissive from the start, just as its angry-sounding name suggests. Hynek, who played no role in Project Grudge, said it “took as its premise that UFOs simply could not be.” Perhaps not surprisingly, its report, issued at the end of 1949, concluded that the phenomena posed no danger to the United States, having resulted from mass hysteria, deliberate hoaxes, mental illness or conventional objects that the witnesses had misinterpreted as otherworldly. It also suggested the subject wasn’t worth further study.

Project Blue Book is born

That might’ve been the end of it. But UFO incidents continued, including some puzzling reports from the Air Force’s own radar operators. The national media began treating the phenomenon more seriously; LIFE magazine did a 1952 cover story, and even the widely respected TV journalist Edward R. Murrow devoted a program to the topic, including an interview with Kenneth Arnold, a pilot whose 1947 sighting of mysterious objects over Mount Rainier in Washington state popularized the term “flying saucer.” The Air Force had little choice but to revive Project Grudge, which soon morphed into the more benignly named Project Blue Book.

Hynek joined Project Blue Book in 1952 and would remain with it until its demise in 1969. For him, it was a side gig as he continued to teach and to pursue other, non-UFO research, at Ohio State. In 1960 he moved to Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois, to chair its astronomy department.

As before, Hynek’s role was to review the reports of UFO sightings and determine whether there was a logical astronomical explanation. Typically that involved a lot of unglamorous paperwork; but now and then, for an especially puzzling case, he had a chance to get out into the field.

There he discovered something he might never have learned from simply reading the files: how normal the people who reported seeing UFOs tended to be. “The witnesses I interviewed could have been lying, could have been insane or could have been hallucinating collectively—but I do not think so,” he recalled in his 1977 book, The Hynek UFO Report.

“Their standing in the community, their lack of motive for perpetration of a hoax, their own puzzlement at the turn of events they believe they witnessed, and often their great reluctance to speak of the experience—all lend a subjective reality to their UFO experience.”

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