Tag: space force

Space Officials Wooing Intelligence Airmen

Article by Rachel S. Cohen                           May 20, 2020                           (airforcemag.com)

• Space intelligence is one area the military wants to expand and refine for intelligence Airmen who opt to join the Space Force. Space Force intends to build its own core intel capabilities, separate from the Air Force, to better identify objects in space and whether they pose a threat to U.S. assets. Working with the National Reconnaissance Office, Space Force Intelligence will encompass space-based ‘intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance’ (ISR) of the low orbit space between the Earth and the Moon.

• Space Force is considering how Airmen could broaden their understanding of the space domain by working in multiple career fields, according to Colonel Suzy Streeter, Space Force’s ISR director. Building the new service from scratch allows intel professionals hold command positions usually taken by Airmen who operate satellites, for instance, said U.S. Space Command’s ISR boss, Brigadier General Leah Lauderback.

• Adding new perspectives to Space Force leadership depends on how Airmen plan out their career paths. One option is having Space Force recruit start as a ‘space operator’ for the first four years, move into intelligence for ten years, and then decide whether to jump back into space operations or remain in Space Force intel. “That will give… a more integrated approach,” said Streeter. Any intelligence professional coming up the ranks in Space Force could become ‘chief of space operations’ after three to five years. Or an Airman could enter Space Force as a traditional intelligence officer and remain so for the rest of their career. They could still dabble in space operations, as the Force needs “ISR visionaries”.

• It has also been suggested that the service bring in new officer level recruits from the other services and industry, starting them as captains and majors. This could prove beneficial for targeting, intel collection management, and cyber operations. Enlisted personnel could also be ‘streamlined’ into operations intelligence and cryptologic analysis fields.

• All intelligence Airmen can apply to join or transfer into Space Force, whether they worked for Air Combat Command, Air Force Space Command, or another USAF organization. “It is likely that the [selection] board will be looking for personnel with a wide range of experiences, to ensure that USSF does not pigeonhole itself into one way of thinking.” The Space Force is accepting transfer applications from intel Airmen through May 31.

• In October, ‘selection board’ panels staffed by senior Air Force and Space Force leaders will decide which intel, acquisition, and other space professionals will join the Space Force starting February 1st, 2021. This panel will also process promotions until the Space Force’s ‘Space Training and Readiness Command’ (‘STARCOM”) is up-and-running and able to tailor a new process to the specific needs of Space Force.

• New Space Force bases will open up for intelligence assignments that weren’t previously used by the Space Force’s predecessor, Air Force Space Command, including Nellis Air Force Base in Nevada; Lackland Air Force Base in Texas; Fort Meade in Maryland; Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Ohio; and assignments at the Pentagon and in Chantilly, Virginia.

[Editor’s Note]    Space Force Intelligence, just let us know when you would like a briefing.

 

New opportunities will open up for intelligence Airmen who opt to join the Space Force, intel officials said in a recent livestream.

Space intelligence is one area the military wants to expand and refine as a result of creating a new armed force focused on the cosmos. The Space Force envisions building its own core intel capabilities, separate from the Air Force, to better identify what and where objects are in space and if they threaten U.S. assets. The career field will work with the National Reconnaissance Office in new ways, encompass space-based ISR of the Earth below, and is pushing into cislunar orbit as well.

    Brigadier General Leah Lauderback

In March, the Air Force listed several intelligence organizations that are newly assigned to the Space Force. Some officials have suggested that the National Air and Space Intelligence Center could ramp up its help for the Space Force or spin off a separate space-focused center as well.

The Space Force is considering how Airmen could work in multiple career fields to broaden their understanding of the space domain, according to Col. Suzy Streeter, the service’s ISR director. Building the new service from scratch allows it to shake up its leadership echelons and let intel professionals hold command positions usually taken by the Airmen who operate satellites, said Brig. Gen. Leah Lauderback, U.S. Space Command intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance boss.

Adding different perspectives to Space Force leadership depends in part on how Airmen transfer in and plan out their career paths.

One staffing option gaining traction is having every member of the Space Force start as a space operator, or 13S. Someone could serve as a space operator for the first four years, move into intelligence for 10 years, and then decide whether to jump back into space operations or remain in intel, according to the presentation’s slideshow.

“That will give, really, a more integrated approach as you’re looking at futures, including, quite frankly, the chief of space operations,” Streeter said. “Why not have that open to whoever is a space professional?”

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At Space Force Flag Unveiling Trump Heralds Secret Space Program Technology Releases

At the unveiling of the Space Force’s new flag on May 15, President Donald Trump delivered remarks claiming that Space Force is the first attempt by the US to deploy weapons and military forces in space, and the US is merely reacting to what China and Russia have previously done with their own respective space forces. Trump referred to fantastic new weapons systems that are being developed for Space Force, which are far more powerful than anything possessed by China and Russia.

Trump’s remarks are highly significant. They reveal a covert strategy of transferring weapons systems acquired secretly by a decades-long US Air Force led secret space program to Space Force, and proclaiming these as new weapons designed to counter recent Chinese and Russian advances in space technology.

Here’s what Trump said at the flag unveiling ceremony:

Well, thank you very much.  This is a very special moment because this is the presentation of the Space Force flag.  So we’ve worked very hard on this.  And it’s so important from a defensive standpoint, from an offensive standpoint, from every standpoint there is.

As you know, China and Russia, perhaps others, started off a lot sooner than us.  We should have started this a long time ago, but we’ve made up for it in spades.  We have developed some of the most incredible weapons anyone has ever seen, and it’s moving along very rapidly.  And we have tremendous people in charge.

After saying China and Russia got the early jump on the US, Trump went on to assert that “we have developed some of the most incredible weapons anyone has ever seen.” This is a very revealing statement which I will soon return to after briefly reviewing the respective conventional space forces developed by the US, Russia, and China.

Trump’s statement that China and Russia “started off a lot sooner than us” is a reference to the creation of new military branches exclusively dedicated to space operations and the deployment of advanced space weapons.

In the case of the US Space Force, the first call for its creation occurred during the Bill Clinton Administration (1993-2001). A Congressional Commission headed by Congressman Donald Rumsfeld (before he was appointed Secretary of Defense) advocated the creation of a Space Corps as a separate military branch back in a March 2001 report.

The September 11, 2001 (false flag) terrorist attacks and the subsequent “war on terror” delayed the creation of a Space Corps until it was revived by Republican Congressman Mike Rogers in 2017, and eventually endorsed by Donald Trump in March 2018 as Space Force. After Congress approved the 2020 National Defense Authorization Act that incorporated the “Space Force Act”, Trump signed it into law on December 20, 2019, formally creating the sixth branch of the US military.

Four years earlier, however, both Russia and China created Space Forces as new subordinate branches in their respective military services, which is why Trump is claiming the US is catching up to these major space adversaries in his speech.

On August 1, 2015, Russia re-established its Space Force under the newly reorganized and renamed Russian Aerospace Forces that combined the Russian Air Force with its former strategic missile defense forces. As a subordinate military branch dedicated exclusively to space operations, the Russian Space Forces focuses on a range of missions as described by the website of the Ministry of Defense of the Russian Federation:

Monitoring space objects and identification of potential threats to the Russian Federation in space and from space, prevention of attacks as needed;

Carrying out spacecraft launches and placing into orbit, controlling satellite systems, including Integrated ones (intended to be used for both military and civilian purposes) in flight, and using separate ones towards providing the Russian Federation Armed Forces with the necessary information;

Maintaining both military and integrated satellite systems with launching installations and assets of control in the workable order, and a number of other tasks.

Only a few months later, in December 2015, China developed a subordinate branch of its People’s Liberation Army (PLA) called the “Strategic Support Force”, which integrated space operations that were previously widely dispersed. Here is how Elysa Kanta, writing for Defense One, described the PLA’s Strategic Support Force (PLASSF):

[T]the PLASSF’s Space Systems Department (航天系统部), evidently a de facto ‘Space Force’ for the Chinese military, has consolidated control over a critical mass of China’s space-based and space-related capabilities. The establishment of a unified structure through the Space Systems Department seems to reflect a response to organizational challenges that resulted from the prior dispersal of these forces, systems, and authorities across the former General Armament Department and General Staff Department.

Consequently, while it is true that Russia and China’s respective Space Forces predate the creation of the US Space Force by four years, it’s wrong to believe that the US is playing catch up to military resources that Russia and China have previously developed and deployed in space.

The formation of the US Space Force is indeed proceeding slowly and lags behind its rival military branches in Russia and China. Currently, the number of Space Force personnel only includes its Chief of Space Operations, General John Raymond, the senior enlisted officer, CMS Roger Towberman, and 86 recent graduates from the US Air Force Academy. While 16,000 personnel are temporarily assigned to Space Force, these are all USAF airmen until they are formally reassigned, which may take up to early 2021 due to the complex bureaucratic process in transferring thousands of personnel from one military branch to another.

Also, Space Force is still in the process of having Air Force bases reassigned and renamed, after having had new uniforms designed on January 17, its seal approved on January 24, and now an official flag. All this indeed gives the impression that the US Space Force is still a few years off from matching what China and Russia have achieved in space, just as Trump described.

However, what Trump didn’t mention is that the USAF has developed and deployed a secret space program that includes squadrons of electromagnetically propelled spacecraft that utilize antigravity principles, along with powerful space-based weapons systems.

In the US Air Force Secret Space Program (2019), I provided extensive documentation and insider testimonies detailing the history of reverse-engineered spacecraft that were first deployed in the 1970s. I described how the USAF had deployed various designs such as saucer, triangle, and even rectangle-shaped craft that are weapons platforms.

Recently, it was learned that the cigar-shaped “Tic Tac” craft recorded by Navy pilots in 2004 were in fact USAF spacecraft being tested against the Navy’s most advanced radar and aircraft intercept technologies. The Tic Tac craft was built by a major US aerospace contractor located at Plant 42, which is adjacent to Edwards Air Force Base.

As described in the US Air Force Secret Space Program, these advanced space assets are in the process of being transferred over to Space Force. The process will take several years and will require public disclosure by the Trump Administration of these newly acquired technologies, and how they were developed.

In his Space Force flag ceremony speech, Trump is clearly laying the foundation for disclosing the “most incredible weapons anyone has ever seen”, and asserting these were only recently developed for Space Force in order to counter the advanced space weapons produced by the Russians and Chinese. The truth is that Space Force is inheriting such weapons from a decades-long USAF secret space program that long ago weaponized space.

Rather than playing catch up to Russia and China, the US has been the clear leader when it comes to the development and deployment of advanced weapons technology in space. This is why China has been hacking, spying on and stealing US advanced space technology secrets for the last three decades to bridge the technology gap, as I described in great detail in Rise of the Red Dragon (2020).

Space Force provides a convenient means of disclosing advanced space technologies that the US has secretly used for decades, without revealing too much about their historical development and deployment. President Trump’s remarks lay the foundation for declassifying advanced electromagnetic technologies that have bewildered Navy pilots and the public for decades in countless UFO sightings.

© Michael E. Salla, Ph.D. Copyright Notice

Further Reading

The Truth Behind Russia’s Mystery ASAT Launch – ‘Not Operational’

Article by Sebastian Kettley                           May 4, 2020                          (express.co.uk)

• On April 15th, Russia risked the ire of America’s Space Force with the launch of a DA-ASAT Nudol interceptor – a direct-ascent anti-satellite mobile missile system designed to destroy satellites in low Earth orbit. Space Force Chief General John W Raymond branded the test another example of “Russia’s hypocritical advocacy of outer space arms controls”.

• A 2018 Pentagon report suggested that China and Russia would have an arsenal of anti-satellite technology ready for deployment by 2020. “The United States is ready and committed to deterring aggression and defending the Nation, our allies and US interests from hostile acts in space,” said General Raymond.

• The Nudol test is not the first time Russia’s actions in space have caught the world’s attention. Earlier this year, a pair of Russian satellites were seen tailing a multi-billion dollar US spy satellite. General Raymond warned the actions could have the “potential to create a dangerous situation in space”.

• According to Space.com, last month’s Russian satellite interceptor test did not produce a swarm of debris in orbit, meaning it did not hit a target. During a webinar broadcast on April 24th, Brian Weeden, director of program planning for the Secure World Foundation, discussed the ASAT technology. Russia is has tested its Nudol system at least 10 times as of May 4. Weeden says, “As far as we can tell, it’s not operational.” Weeden believes Russia is still a long way from successfully deploying its ASAT technology against foreign targets.

• The Nudol interceptor can target satellites up to 1,240 miles in low earth orbit. Most US spy satellites are in geostationary orbits of about 22,200 miles above the earth. Pavel Podvig, director of the Russian Nuclear Forces Project and senior research fellow at the United Nations Institute for Disarmament Research, said during the webinar that “Basically, with this kind of (anti-satellite weapon), or even with a more kind of advanced ASAT, it’s hard to imagine a military mission in which this capability would be useful.” “In that sense, I’m an optimist. I do believe these capabilities will not be used (militarily), just because I do believe that they don’t give you much in terms of military capability.”

 

On April 15, Russia risked the ire of America’s Space Force with the launch of a DA-ASAT Nudol interceptor – a direct-ascent anti-satellite mobile

                  Brian Weeden

missile system. The ASAT system is designed to destroy satellites in low Earth orbit (LEO), which the US considers a possible threat to its interests.General John W Raymond, Space Force Chief of Space Operations, branded the test another example of “Russia’s hypocritical advocacy of outer space arms controls”.

             General John W Raymond

He said: “The United States is ready and committed to deterring aggression and defending the Nation,

our allies and US interests from hostile acts in space.”

The test came after a Pentagon report published in 2018 suggested China and Russia would have an arsenal of anti-satellite technology ready for deployment by 2020.

Some security experts, however, are not convinced Russia’s April launch proves Moscow’s ability to shoot

                  Pavel Podvig

down satellites just yet.

Unlike a similar test carried out by India in March 2019, the launch was not an impact test.

According to Space.com, the launch did not produce a swarm of debris in orbit, meaning it did not hit a target.

And Brian Weeden, director of programme planning for the Secure World Foundation, does not believe the system is fully operational.

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