• Home
  • Peter Davenport

Tag: Peter Davenport

Cities Across the Carolinas Report UFO Sightings

Article by Joe Marusak                              August 27, 2020                               (charlotteobserver.com)

• The San Francisco-based True People SearchNational compiled the rankings of US cities with the most UFO sighting reports sent to the National UFO Reporting Center in Davenport, Washington. Founded in 1974, NUFORC offers both an online form and a telphone hotline for people in the US and Canada to add their ‘objective UFO data’ to a public database.

• The True People website analyzed more than 80,000 reported UFO sightings, and then narrowed it down to 446 cities with 25 or more sightings over a 114 year period, through 2014. Seattle topped the list of major cities with 620 sightings, more than double second-place Phoenix. Charlotte, NC and Jacksonville, Florida were the only Eastern US cities making the top ten.

• Nationwide, “lights have been reported to move in weird patterns, flash, appear and disappear, display in a formation, and more. While some lights can be explained as an aircraft originating from Earth, a meteor, or satellites, some reports have remained shrouded in mystery,” says Mitchell Barrick, content director for True People Search Insights.

• Charlotte’s 153 sightings of mysterious lights, discs and orbs in the sky since 1910 ranked ninth among the 25 largest cities by population. ‘Unexplained light in the sky’ is the most commonly reported type of UFO in the US, “and this holds true for Charlotte,” said Barrick. Other commonly reported objects in the US include triangles, circles, fireballs, disks, sphere, snake-like UFOs (cigars and cylinders), chevrons, eggs and cones.

• Adjusting for comparative population density, however, Charlotte had 17 reported UFO sightings per 100,000 people, which ranks 37th in North America and only 6th in North Carolina. Three South Carolina cities were ranked in the top ten when comparing population density. Surfside Beach, SC came in at No. 3 with 671 sightings per 100,000 people; Myrtle Beach at No. 6 with 507 sightings; and North Myrtle Beach at No. 9 with 380 sightings. Wilmington ranked highest per capita in North Carolina. Its 58 sightings translated to 47 sightings per 100,000 people, good for 162nd place in North America, followed by Asheville with 43 sightings (168th place); Gastonia with 25 sightings (252nd place); Fayetteville with 43 sightings (351st place); and Greensboro with 56 sightings (364th place). After these came Cary with 28 sightings; Raleigh with 78 sightings; Durham with 33 sightings; and Winston-Salem with 27 sightings.

• According to Barrick, “[I]t’s our theory that a higher frequency of sightings correlates with a higher percentage of reports from people who believe they have genuinely seen something in the sky that they cannot explain: a UFO.”

• Peter Davenport, director of the National UFO Reporting Center, said NUFORC has received a spate of recent UFO reports from the Carolina coast. People have reported red, orange, yellow, amber and gold lights in the sky above the Atlantic Ocean – lights with no earthly explanation. For instance, on August 18, a retired senior law enforcement official in Conway, SC saw a tiny, white colored, strobing light fly overhead from NNE to SSW. The object is joined by a second similar object, and then two more, for a total of four objects. (see 1:52 minute video below) “Because of the strobing, and because of the direction the objects were traveling, the witness doubted whether they could have been ‘Starlink’ satellites.”

• Another phenomena associated with the Carolinas for over a century are mysterious apparitions known as the ‘Brown Mountain Lights’ which have been reported in the North Carolina highlands. In summer 2016, a scientific team from Appalachian State University captured on video a bright orb that “suddenly appeared and then vanished” high above a Brown Mountain ridge. “Then it came back, same spot,” The Charlotte Observer reported. “And then an encore.”

 

Charlotte has managed to beam itself up into the ranking of the top 10 largest North American cities for total UFO sightings in the past century, a new study shows.

And other cities in the Carolinas made related lists for sightings per capita, including Wilmington, Asheville and Myrtle Beach.

The Queen City’s 153 sightings of mysterious lights, discs and orbs in the sky since 1910 had Charlotte ranked ninth among the 25 largest cities by population and tops in North Carolina. That’s according to San Francisco-based True People Search, which compiled the rankings based on sightings people sent to the National UFO Reporting Center in Davenport, Wash.

Founded in 1974, the non-profit center maintains a public database of “objective UFO data,” according to its website. It offers an online form and telephone hotline to report sightings.

The people-finder website analyzed more than 80,000 reported UFO sightings in the U.S. and Canada. It then narrowed the list to 446 cities with 25 or more total sightings over 114 years, through 2014, Mitchell Barrick, content director for True People Search Insights told The Charlotte Observer in an email Wednesday.

Seattle topped the list of major cities with 620 sightings, more than double second-place Phoenix. Jacksonville, Fla., was the only other Eastern U.S. city in the top 10, falling just one sighting shy of Charlotte’s overall total.

 

1:52 minute timelapse video of objects streaking over the NC Outer Banks (‘Wes Snyder Photography’ YouTube)

READ ENTIRE ARTICLE

 

FAIR USE NOTICE: This page contains copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. ExoNews.org distributes this material for the purpose of news reporting, educational research, comment and criticism, constituting Fair Use under 17 U.S.C § 107. Please contact the Editor at ExoNews with any copyright issue.

California, Florida Report Highest in Number of UFO Sightings

Article by Scott Harrell                                   August 27, 2020                                      (baynews9.com)

• Every so often, a new UFO sighting or the release of documents reaches the mainstream news and reignites the public’s interest in unexplained aerial phenomena. In 2019, it was the US Navy’s acknowledgement that three leaked and ultimately declassified videos were in fact UFOs. No one, however, would go so far as to say they were spaceships from another planet. This renewed the curiosity of those American who are not too skeptical to consider at least the possibility of the existence of extraterrestrial life.

• In June of 2020, the Senate Intelligence Committee chaired by Republican Florida Senator Marco Rubio included a provision in its annual authorization bill requiring various military and intelligence agencies to compile a detailed analysis on UFOs. The analysis would be declassified and available to the public, and must be completed within 180 days of the bill’s passage.

• Not everyone in the UFO-watching community is excited about the subject’s current pop-cultural hype, however. “Coverage is trendy. That’s one of the problems we have,” says Peter Davenport, director of the National UFO Reporting Center. “A lot of UFOlogists are very serious people indeed, doing serious work, and we only get covered if there’s a trend in [the culture].”

• Davenport, a former candidate for both Washington state legislature and U.S. House of Representatives who holds master’s degrees in biology and finance, has directed the NUFORC since 1994. Why did he choose to become the NUFORC Director? “Well, I saw one when I was a kid,” he says. The incident took place while he and his family were at a drive-in theater in St. Louis. “We were watching the movie, and a disturbance started brewing in the theater area,” Davenport says. “We didn’t know what it was. Then there were people walking in front of our car, looking up to the right, to the east of us. “There was an amazingly bright fire engine red object that looked something like an English rugby ball. It appeared to be almost motionless, then shot straight up, and then down behind [a building]. All of that happened in five or six seconds.” Hundreds, “if not thousands” of people witnessed the event. Since then, Davenport says he’s sighted other UFOs that he’s “reasonably certain were not made on this planet.”

• Since 1996, the NUFORC website has racked up more than 90,000 reported sightings, nearly all of them from North America. They include descriptions that run the gamut from “a series of bright spheres moved slowly, one-by-one, in a southerly direction, away from a stationary sphere” (Gloucester, Massachusetts, 7/8/18) to “White light circling a star” (Pearland, Texas, 8/14/20).

• California and Florida are the U.S. states that boast far and away the highest numbers of reported sightings, with 10,015 and 5,602, respectively. Both states are known for a lot of aerodynamic and space exploration research. “People report everything as UFOs, but I doubt that theory is correct,” Davenport says. “I can’t prove it, of course. The population, weather conditions, the fact that people are outdoors quite often [in those states]—there are many, many variables.”

 

FLORIDA — At least once or so a decade, a story about a new UFO sighting (or newly released documents about an old one) pops up on the

               Peter Davenport

mainstream media’s radar. When that happens, it always seems to instantly reignite the popular culture’s interest in unexplained aerial phenomena.
Last year, the U.S. Navy acknowledged that the objects seen in three widely leaked and ultimately declassified videos were, in fact, unidentified flying objects, in the most general sense of the term. (I.e., nobody in the military is saying they were spaceships piloted by beings from another planet.) The story was picked up by most major news outlets, and once again captured the imagination of those Americans not too skeptical to consider at least the possibility of the existence of extraterrestrial life.

That renewed curiosity has continued. In June of this year, the Senate Intelligence Committee—chaired by Republican Florida Senator Marco Rubio—included a provision in its annual authorization bill requiring various military and intelligence agencies to compile a detailed analysis of all of the other data on unexplained aerial phenomena. The analysis would be declassified and available to the public and must be completed within 180 days of the bill’s passage.

While the ostensible reason for the provision is defense against a potential threat to the U.S., its mere existence serves as evidence of the public’s continued interest.

Not everyone in the UFO-watching community is excited about the subject’s current pop-cultural hype and the public’s cycling infatuation, however.
“Coverage is trendy. That’s one of the problems we have,” says Peter Davenport, director of the National UFO Reporting Center. “A lot of UFOlogists are very serious people indeed, doing serious work, and we only get covered if there’s a trend in [the culture].”

READ ENTIRE ARTICLE

 

FAIR USE NOTICE: This page contains copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. ExoNews.org distributes this material for the purpose of news reporting, educational research, comment and criticism, constituting Fair Use under 17 U.S.C § 107. Please contact the Editor at ExoNews with any copyright issue.

Inside the World of UFOs, Extraterrestrial Life

Article by Josh Martinez                         June 5, 2020                          (yourvalley.net)

• In 1974, Robert J. Gribble founded the National UFO Reporting Center (NUFORC) to record UFO sightings via people’s submissions by phone or by mail. Gribble reached out to sheriff’s offices to provide them with an outlet for anyone wanting to report a UFO sighting. In fact, in its bylaws the Federal Aviation Administration is directed to refer such encounters to the NUFORC. Submissions published in NUFORC’s public database are anonymous, although witnesses may submit short statements detailing their experience.

• In 1994, Peter Davenport took over as NUFORC’s director. Davenport says the organization’s mission is to record – not investigate UFOs, and to curate its online submissions through a 24-hour UFO hotline. NUFORC may include a note with a submission as to a possible explanation, such as a planet of satellite. But for the most part, they leave their submissions ‘as is’ for the database. The NUFORC website holds a trove of reports from across the country. But Davenport believes the amount of UFO reports are grossly undercounted. By his estimate, he believes for every 10,000-20,000 people who see a UFO, only one will report it.

• On March 13, 1997, Arizonans watched a series of strange lights on two distinct occasions. The first was triangular formation that flew across the state, while the second was a series of stationary lights that hovered over Phoenix. The first event – a series of lights in a V-formation that traveled from Nevada, across Arizona to Sonora, Mexico, was “explained” as wind-driven flares from an A-10 Warthog military aircraft. The second incident has no explanation at all. “I’ll never be the same,” said Bill Greiner, a cement truck driver who saw the lights. “I may be just a dumb truck driver, but I’ve seen something that don’t belong here.”

• Seeing unexplained phenomenon in the sky tugs at the question: are we alone in the universe? Davenport believes that as people’s curiosity grows the more they understand the vastness of what is out there past Earth’s atmosphere. “Once a person develops a better grasp of its immensity, I feel it is a natural extrapolation for that person to ask what might be going on out there,” wrote Davenport. “And that leads a person to at least wonder whether we might have neighbors and even visitors to our planet.”

• Davenport notes that there was minimal media coverage of the Phoenix Lights event. This media trend has continued along with academia being too skeptical and the government not letting on what it knows. Still, an increase of the subject of UFOs in news reports and entertainment is drawing attention. People have become more comfortable with the UFO topic. But there is more work to be done, says Davenport. “[I]f we are going to progress beyond the amateur stage of investigation, we will have to improve the means by which we collect, and analyze data about the UFO phenomenon.”

• According to a 2018 survey at Chapman University, 41.4% of American respondents believe alien intelligent life has visited the earth in the ancient past, up from 27% in 2016. “People like to imagine there might be intelligent life out there, which is harmless,” says Dr. Chris Impey, the associate dean of the University of Arizona’s College of Science. “[B]ut the conspiracy theories that have the government covering up evidence of aliens is hard to defend. UFOs are not of interest to professional scientists because they know the hard evidence of alien visitation is lacking.”

• Dr Impey focuses his research is in looking for microbial life on the projected 10 billion habitable Earth-like worlds in the Milky Way Galaxy, noting that for 3 billion years, microbes were the planet’s only inhabitants. Targeting exoplanets to see if their atmospheres contain molecules like oxygen or methane will provide the “telltale signs of life”. As for intelligent extraterrestrial life, Dr. Impey points out that scientists have listened for artificial radio or optical signals from other planets over the past 60 years, and have failed to find anything.

• Long odds, however, haven’t stopped many from believing in past or future encounters with extraterrestrial life. Arizona State University Associate Professor Dr. Michael Varnum published a study in 2018 suggesting humans would have largely positive reactions extra-terrestrial life visiting the Earth. The study found those wanting to avoid disease were more likely to have a negative reaction, while less religious people tended to have more positive responses to an ET visitation. It concluded that people who are less sensitive to external threats are more open to things that challenge their belief systems.

• Although it’s been over 23 years since the mysterious lights above Phoenix, but time hasn’t slowed the reports to the NUFORC of continued sightings. On January 9th, a Phoenix pilot claimed to see a rectangular object with lights that changed colors hovering in the evening sky. “I’ll never forget this sighting. This had to be a UFO.”

 

Phoenix has a deep connection to the unexplained.

On March 13, 1997, many Arizonans from across the state allegedly saw a series of strange lights on two distinct occasions. The first was triangular formation that reportedly flew across the state while the second was a series of stationary lights hovering over Phoenix.

While the U.S. Air Force has explained the hovering stationary lights — flares from an A-10 Warthog aircraft as part of training at the Barry Goldwater Range, according to the Mutual UFO Network — the second one doesn’t have an explanation.

The first event was a series of lights in a V-formation that traveled across the state from as far north as Henderson, Nevada to as far south as the State of Sonora, Mexico.

One possible explanation is the wind direction from the night in question appears consistent with the reported movements of the lights, according to MUFON’s website. This could, the website claims, explain the event as merely wind-driven objects such as flares or balloons.

But to others, the event was not of this world.

“I’ll never be the same,” Bill Greiner, a cement truck driver who reportedly saw the lights, said via a statement on MUFON’s website. “Before this, if anybody had told me they saw a UFO, I would’ve said, ‘Yeah and I believe in the Tooth Fairy.’ Now I’ve got a whole new view and I may be just a dumb truck driver, but I’ve seen something that don’t belong here.”

In the years since, there have been reportedly other large-scale incidents in 2007 and 2008, but explanations have come with those events. Still, the fascination with UFOs, or unidentified flying objects, has permeated in the state.

In 2019, there were 229 reports of UFOs in Arizona, according to the National UFO Reporting Center. That is a stark jump from 91 in 2018, but is the first increase from year-to-year since 2014, which saw a peak of 304 for the past decade.

While some of these sightings have explanations, others do not, allowing for some imaginations to run wild.

By definition, a UFO doesn’t necessarily mean aliens, it can be as simple as a flying drone that people don’t know exactly its origins.

Bryan Martyn flew helicopters in both the Army and the Air Force for many years before transitioning to medical evacuation helicopters. He’s never had an experience where he didn’t know what object he was seeing in the sky, except for a recent sighting of Elon Musk’s Starlink satellites.

This experience exemplifies to him the unidentified lights must be a technology people are not aware of, similar to the satellites.

“When I see objects in the sky that I can see, that kind of tells me they’re probably military because it’d be too easy,” Mr. Martyn said. “If we were being observed by something from outside, like an unidentified thing, they’d probably turn their lights off.”

READ ENTIRE ARTICLE

 

FAIR USE NOTICE: This page contains copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. ExoNews.org distributes this material for the purpose of news reporting, educational research, comment and criticism, constituting Fair Use under 17 U.S.C § 107. Please contact the Editor at ExoNews with any copyright issue.

Copyright © 2019 Exopolitics Institute News Service. All Rights Reserved.