Tag: Nick Pope

Last ‘UFO’ Sightings Reported to RAF Will Be Published Online

by Press Association 2019                       January 26, 2020                          (largsandmillportnews.com)

• When Nick Pope worked at the ‘UFO Desk’ at Britain’s Ministry of Defence (MoD) in the 1990s, “we didn’t find definitive proof of extraterrestrial visitation, but there were so many bizarre and unexplained sightings that we didn’t entirely rule it out.”

• In 2009, the Royal Air Force (RAF) determined that after more than 50 years, no UFO report received by the MoD had ever disclosed any evidence of a potential threat. So the MoD closed its UFO Desk and told the public that all of its UFO files were turned over to Britain’s National Archives, ultimately for full public disclosure.

• But a recent investigation stemming from a Freedom of Information Act filing revealed that some UFO reports had not been released. Rather than continuing to send these reports to the National Archives, the RAF/MoD has determined that it would publish all remaining UFO reports and documents on a dedicated gov.uk web page. A clearance process for these documents is currently under way, and online publication is expected to take place in the first quarter of 2020.

• From now on, any new UFO sightings by the British public will be directed to their local police force.

• So now the MoD’s official position is: “The MoD has no opinion on the existence or otherwise of extraterrestrial life and does not investigate UFO reports.”

 

The RAF took the decision to wind up its UFO unit in 2009, after concluding that in more than 50 years, no received report had ever disclosed any evidence of a potential threat.

        Nick Pope

Previously, records from the unit were given to the National Archives, often initially classified before being released after a specific number of years.

But the most recent reports received by the RAF will be placed online, the PA news agency can disclose, following a Freedom of Information Act request.

Members of the public reporting alleged UFO sightings are now directed to their local police force.

A spokesman for the RAF said that “it had been assessed that it would be better to publish these records, rather than continue sending documents to the National Archives, and so they are looking to put them on to a dedicated gov.uk web page”.

A clearance process for the documents is currently under way before publication, which is expected to take place “some time within the first quarter of 2020”.

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How the CIA Tried to Quell a UFO Panic During the Cold War

Listen to “E222 How the CIA Tried to Quell a UFO Panic During the Cold War” on Spreaker.

Article by Becky Little                     January 5, 2020                      (history.com)

• In the 1950s, when Cold War anxiety in America ranged from Soviet psychological warfare to nuclear annihilation, LIFE Magazine published a story titled “Have We Visitors From Space?” that offered “scientific evidence that there is a real case for interplanetary saucers.” A few months later in the summer of 1952, newspaper headlines blared reports of flying saucers swarming Washington, D.C. During this period, the US Air Force said that reported UFO sightings jumped from 23 to 148.

• the U.S. government worried about the prospect of a growing national hysteria. The CIA decided it needed a “national policy” for “what should be told the public regarding the phenomenon, in order to minimize risk of panic.” The CIA convened a group of scientists to investigate whether the UFO phenomena represented a national security threat.

• The CIA’s Office of Scientific Intelligence collaborated with Howard Percy Robertson, a professor of mathematical physics at the California Institute of Technology, to gather a panel of nonmilitary scientists. The Robertson panel met for a few days in January 1953 to review Air Force records about UFO sightings going back to 1947. The panel reviewed Project Blue Book investigators Captain Edward J. Ruppelt and J. Allen Hynek and concluded that many of these ‘unexplained’ sightings were actually explainable if you just got creative about it. The panel’s main concern was controlling public hysteria.

• According to former UK government UFO investigator, Nick Pope, the CIA was worried that “the Soviets would find a way to use the huge level of public interest in UFOs to somehow manipulate, to cause panic; which then could be used to undermine national cohesiveness.” The Robertson report itself supports this viewpoint, suggesting “mass hysteria” over UFOs could lead to “greater vulnerability to possible enemy psychological warfare.”

• The Robertson report, which was released to the public in 1975 (see the Robertson report here), recommended debunking the notion of UFOs in the media content of articles, TV shows and movies in order to “… reduce the current gullibility of the public and … their susceptibility to clever hostile propaganda.”

• News reporter and book author, Leslie Kean, points to a CBS television show hosted by Walter Cronkite in 1966, which a Robertson panelist claimed to have helped organize “around the Robertson panel conclusions”. The program focused on debunking UFO sightings.

• Between 1966 and 1968, the US Air Force commissioned another ‘scientific’ inquiry into Project Blue Book by physicist Edward U. Condon and a group of scientists at the University of Colorado. The Condon Committee concluded that UFOs posed no threat to the U.S., and that most sightings could be easily explained. It also suggested that the Air Force end Project Blue Book’s investigations into UFOs—which it did in 1969. (see Condon Report here)

• UFO researchers have suggested that the government never really allowed the Robertson panel, the Condon Committee, or even Project Blue Book to review the most sensitive ‘classified’ UFO sightings. This is directly supported by a 1969 memo signed by Brigadier General Carroll H. Bolender revealing the Air Force hadn’t shared all UFO sightings with Project Blue Book and would continue to investigate sightings that could present a national security threat after the project ended.

• Critics claim that the real goal of the Robertson panel, the Condon Committee, and Project Blue Book was never to identify UFOs, but simply to influence public reaction to them. If so, then the government must have had information about extraterrestrials it wanted to conceal.

• The secrecy involving national security issues gave the CIA and the Air Force the audacity to explain away UFO sightings as “natural phenomena such as ice crystals and temperature inversions.” An example of a cover-up of UFOs that continues to today is the CIA’s claim that over half of the UFOs reported in the 1950s and 60s were actually US spy planes. CIA National Reconnaissance Office historian Gerald K. Haines notes a CIA tweet in 2014 that read, “Remember reports of unusual activity in the skies in the ‘50s? That was us.”

 

     Howard Percy Robertson

In January 1953, the fledgling Central Intelligence Agency had a thorny situation on its hands. Reports of UFO sightings were mushrooming around the country. Press accounts were fanning public fascination—and concern. So the CIA convened a group of scientists to investigate whether these unknown phenomena in the sky represented a national security threat.

                  The Robertson Panel

But there was something else.

At a time when growing Cold War anxiety about the Soviets ranged from psychological warfare to wholesale nuclear annihilation, the U.S. government worried about the prospect of a growing national hysteria. In the previous year, UFOs had begun to figure prominently in the public conversation. In April 1952, the popular magazine LIFE published a story titled “Have We Visitors from Space?” that promised to offer “scientific evidence that there is a real case for interplanetary saucers.” In July that year, newspaper headlines around the country blared reports of flying saucers swarming Washington, D.C. Between March and June that year, the number of UFO sightings officially reported to the U.S. Air Force jumped from 23 to 148. Given all the attention UFOs were getting, the CIA decided it needed a “national policy” for “what should be told the public regarding the phenomenon, in order to minimize risk of panic,” according to government documents.

The Robertson report: The real enemy is hysteria

          Edward U. Condon

To this end, the CIA’s Office of Scientific Intelligence collaborated with Howard Percy Robertson, a professor of mathematical physics at the California Institute of Technology, to gather a panel of nonmilitary scientists. The Robertson panel met for a few days in January 1953 to review Air Force records about UFO sightings going back to 1947.

Project Blue Book, which had started in 1952, was the latest iteration of the Air Force’s UFO investigative teams. After interviewing project members Captain Edward J. Ruppelt and astronomer J. Allen Hynek, the panel concluded that many sightings Blue Book had tracked were, in fact, explainable. For example, after reviewing film taken of a UFO sighting near Great Falls, Montana on August 15, 1950, the panel concluded what the film actually showed was sunlight reflecting off the surface of two Air Force interceptor jets.

The panel did actually see a potential threat related to this phenomena—but it wasn’t saucers and little green men.

“It was the public itself,” says John Greenewald, Jr., founder of The Black Vault, an online archive of government documents. There was a concern “that the general public, with their panic and hysteria, could overwhelm the resources of the U.S. government” in a time of crisis.

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Four Questions That Need to Be Answered in 2020 to Solve the Mystery of UFOs

Listen to “E219 Four Questions That Need to Be Answered in 2020 to Solve the Mystery of UFOs” on Spreaker.

Article by Jasper Hamill                             January 6, 2020                            (metro.co.uk)

• We’re currently living in a golden age of ufology. In the 20th century, anyone who saw mysterious objects in the sky was dismissed as a crank or a fraudster. But that changed in December 2017 when the New York Times revealed the existence of a shadowy US government project called the ‘Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program’ (AATIP) which gathered information about ‘unidentified aerial phenomena’, i.e.: ‘UFOs’. In the most famous of three Navy videos released, Navy pilots from the USS Nimitz carrier group off of San Diego chased a “Tic Tac” shaped UFO through the skies.

• While no one has come forward to claim that these UFOs are anything besides top secret experimental military craft by an Earthbound nation, the Navy did file US patents last year for ‘mass-reduction’ technology resembling anti-gravity used for propulsion. And the AATIP research investigated wormholes, invisibility cloaking, warp drives and high energy laser weapons.

• Former UK Ministry of Defence UFO investigator, Nick Pope (pictured above), told Metro that “the UFO phenomenon has come out of the fringe and into the mainstream”. “Expectations are high that 2020 will bring further bombshell revelations.” But it may be information overload for some in the UFO community. So Pope has offered four questions that, if answered, would clear up much of the current confusion in UFO circles.

• First: What is the US Government’s current ‘best assessment’ of the objects depicted in the 3 US Navy videos? Instead of asking government officials ‘what these objects are’, they should be asking what is the government’s ‘best assessment’ of these mysterious craft based on various meetings? Even if it is wrong, they are on the spot to give some type of assessment.

• Second: What’s the truth about the ‘metamaterials’? We know that the ‘To The Stars Academy’ and Bigelow Aerospace had possession of so-called ‘metamaterials’ recovered from UAP (or UFOs) that had been sent by researchers over the years, or recovered by ‘governmental sources’. Also, the US Army signed a development agreement with To The Stars Academy to study these metamaterials. Will the Army reveal the results?

• Third: Why is the Pentagon walking back on its earlier admission that AATIP investigated UAP? Initial statements about the AATIP Pentagon UFO program described it as an effort to assess advanced aerospace threats to the United States “including anomalous events”. In May 2019, a Navy spokesperson confirmed that AATIP “did pursue research and investigation into unidentified aerial phenomena”. But in a more recent statement, a Pentagon spokesperson stated that ‘AATIP was not UAP related’, directly contradicting the former Pentagon AATIP point man Luis Elizondo, who said “AATIP was a 100% UFO program”. In fact, a January 2019 DIA letter to Congress listed the studies generated by AATIP which included anti-gravity, invisibility, stargates, warp drive, and wormholes. We have one part of the government saying one thing, while another says something else. This needs to be sorted out.

• Fourth: What’s the status of Congressional interest in all this? The public doesn’t know what’s been discussed in closed meetings regarding UFOs in the Armed Services Committee, the Intelligence Committee and the Homeland Security Committee. We don’t know what is being discussed in Senate and House subcommittees, or what documents made have been generated and made available to the public. And we don’t know whether these Congressional inquiries will evolve into formal public hearings or not.

 

We’re currently living in a golden age of ufology.

In the 20th century, anyone who saw mysterious objects in the sky was dismissed as a crank or a fraudster.

But that changed almost exactly two years ago when a bombshell article published in the New York Times revealed the existence of a shadowy US government project called the Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program (AATIP) which gathered information about ‘unidentified aerial phenomena’ (UAP).

This secret programme gathered information on at least three sightings of aircraft travelling at impossible speeds which were recorded by US airmen or military personnel.

In the most famous incident revealed during the uncovering of AATIP, two Navy pilots chased a ‘whitish oval object, about the size of a commercial plane’. This ‘Tic Tac’ UFO was observed off the coast of San Diego in 2004 and followed by two by jets launched from the USS Nimitz.

Since this report, details of the strange and almost unbelievable work carried out by AATIP has slowly leaked into the public domain. And in that time, Metro has worked closely with Nick Pope, a former Ministry of Defence UFO investigator, to cover all the revelations.

Now he’s set out four questions which need to be solved in order for us to solve the UFO mystery once and for all.

He told Metro: ‘We’ve recently passed the second anniversary of the New York Times story revealing the existence of the Pentagon’s AATIP (Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program) initiative, and in those last 2 years the UFO phenomenon has come out of the fringe and into the mainstream.

‘Expectations are high that 2020 will bring further bombshell revelations, but it’s difficult for the UFO community and the wider public to navigate this complex story. There’s information overload, with so much data that most people struggle to identify the parts of the story that are not just interesting, but important.

‘To help people focus on the key issues, I’ve used my insider knowledge of having run the UK government’s UFO project to identify four critical questions. The answers would clear up much of the confusion.’

Of course, it’s worth remembering that we have no official explanation of the sightings yet. The advanced aircraft could be experimental flying machines built secretly by the US Government or even one of its enemies. Last year, we uncovered a patent granted to the US Navy for an exotic aircraft which used ‘mass-reduction’ technology to reduce its mass and lessen inertia (an object’s resistance to motion) so it can zoom along at high velocities.

Although we don’t know if the patented tech was used in a real aircraft, the invention was so advanced that it resembled the anti-gravity mechanisms found in science fiction movies.

AATIP researchers also investigated wormholes, invisibility cloaking, warp drives and high energy laser weapons during a probe into UAP.

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