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UFOs Are Real But They Might Not Be From Outer Space!

by Oon Yeoh                      June 30, 2019                       (nst.com.my)

• Navy pilots recently interviewed by The New York Times and appearing in the History Channel documentary series: Unidentified: Inside America’s UFO Investigation, reported detecting several UFOs during flight training between 2014 and 2015. Their radars detected these UFOs flying at hypersonic speeds at altitudes just over 9000 metres (30,000 feet), despite having no obvious means of propulsion. UFO sightings along the Southeastern US coast and in the Persian Gulf have been reported by six Navy pilots. One of the pilots, Lt. Danny Accoin, said, “It seemed like (the UFOs) were aware of our presence because they would actively move around us.” None of the pilots suggested that the UFOs were alien in origin, however.

• Leon Golub, a senior astrophysicist at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, said the possibility of an extra-terrestrial cause “is so unlikely that it competes with many other low-probability but more mundane explanations,” such as “bugs in the code for the imaging and display systems, atmospheric effects and reflections, neurological overload from multiple inputs during high-speed flight.”

• As a rule, the more mundane explanation for UFO sightings is the logical one. The US Air Force’s Project Blue Book collected more than 12,000 sightings between 1952 and 1969. All but 6% were “explained” astronomical, atmospheric or human phenomena. The US National Science Foundation’s Project Ozma monitored two stars: Tau Ceti and Epsilon Eridani for six hours a day from April to July 1960. No signal was found.

• Seth Shostak, a senior astronomer at the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence Institute (SETI) said the UFOs could be drones from rival countries. Shostak also noted that these pilots began spotting the UFOs after their plane’s radar system was upgraded, which suggests that the sightings might be due to some software bug. SETI began as a government program under NASA, and continued as a private effort in 1993 when funding from the US Congress ended.

• The SETI Institute in a joint project with the University of California, Berkeley, built 42 individual telescopes that function as a single massive instrument to observe up to 1 million nearby stars for radio or optical signals. Dubbed the Allen Telescope Array, it began observations in 2007. Italy’s University of Bologna also has a radio SETI search, and Harvard University in Boston has an optical SETI search. So, while the US Air Force’s detection of UFOs might not be aliens visiting the Earth – the various SETI efforts around the world might just one day lead to such a discovery.

[Editor’s Note]   Once again, the Deep State institutions are lining up to debunk what Navy pilots are seeing with their own eyes.  Seth Shostak and SETI along with Harvard-Smithsonian, are leading the charge toward abject unenlightenment and disinformation surrounding the extraterrestrial/UFO phenomenon. Despite the overwhelming evidence of UFO’s, or ET-controlled drone UFOs which is most likely, that are routinely operating in our skies, the Deep State is pushing hard to make sure that the mainstream public does not take this seriously, and to disregard it all as a ‘glitch in the technology’. ‘There’s nothing to see here. We have it covered. Move along. Move along.’

 

According to recent media reports, between 2014 and 2015, US Navy pilots detected several Unidentified Flying Objects (UFOs) during training. Their radars detected these UFOs flying at hypersonic speeds at altitudes just over 9000 metres, despite having no obvious means of propulsion.

In total, six pilots who were stationed on the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt during that time period spotted UFOs during flights along the Southeast coast of the US, The New York Timesreported late last month.

Two of the Navy pilots interviewed by The New York Times have also appeared in the new History Channel documentary series: Unidentified: Inside America’s UFO Investigation, which also premiered late last month.

The objects had “no distinct wing, no distinct tail, no distinct exhaust plume,” Lt. Danny Accoin, one of the pilots said. “It seemed like they were aware of our presence because they would actively move around us.”

Accoin had told the Times that although tracking equipment, radar and infrared cameras on his aircraft had detected the UFOs twice, he was unable to capture them on his helmet camera.

Meanwhile, Lt. Ryan Graves, the other pilot featured in the documentary said that a squadron of UFOs followed his Navy strike group up and down the eastern coast of the US for months. After the USS Theodore Roosevelt was deployed to the Arabian Gulf in March 2015, the UFOs reappeared.

Such accounts would surely fire up the imagination of those of us who are fascinated by the thought of extra-terrestrials visiting our planet. However before we get too excited about this prospect, it’s worth noting that none of the pilots interviewed by the Times suggested that the UFOs they detected were alien in origin.

So, what were they? Well, the pilots themselves thought that they might have been part of a highly-classified drone programme using cutting-edge technology. There are other possibilities.

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FAIR USE NOTICE: This page contains copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. ExoNews.org distributes this material for the purpose of news reporting, educational research, comment and criticism, constituting Fair Use under 17 U.S.C § 107. Please contact the Editor at ExoNews with any copyright issue.

‘Wow, What Is That?’ Navy Pilots Report Unexplained Flying Objects

by Helene Cooper, Ralph Blumenthal and Leslie Kean                    May 26, 2019                (nytimes.com)

• In the summer of 2014, F/A-18 Super Hornet (pictured above) pilots Lieutenant Ryan Graves and Lieutenant Danny Accoin were part of the VFA-11 “Red Rippers” squadron out of Naval Air Station Oceana, Virginia Beach, VA, a US Navy master jet base. They were training for deployment to the Persian Gulf using an upgraded cockpit radar system. As they would climb to 30,000 feet and then dive down to sea level, they noticed consistent UFOs that their older radar systems wouldn’t pick up. They ignored them, reasoning that these were false tracks. “It would be a pretty big deal to have something up there,” said Lt Graves.

• But the UFOs persisted, showing up at 30,000 feet, 20,000 feet, even sea level. They could accelerate, slow down and then hit hypersonic speeds. Lt Accoin interacted with the UFOs twice. The first time, he set his plane to merge with it, flying 1,000 feet below it. He said he should have been able to see it with his helmet camera, but could not, even though his radar told him it was there. A few days later, Lt Accoin said a training missile on his jet locked on the object and his infrared camera picked it up as well. “I knew I had it, I knew it was not a false hit,” he said. But still, “I could not pick it up visually.”

• In late 2014, Lt Graves was back at base in Virginia Beach when he encountered a squadron mate just back from a mission “with a look of shock on his face.” The pilot told Lt Graves, “I almost hit one of those things.” The pilot and his wingman were flying in tandem about 100 feet apart over the Atlantic Ocean east of Virginia Beach when something that looked like a sphere encasing a cube flew between them. An aviation flight safety report was filed. This was no secret drone. “It was going to be a matter of time before someone had a “midair collision,” said Lt Graves.

• The cockpit videos showed UFOs accelerating to hypersonic speed, making sudden stops and instantaneous turns -something beyond the physical limits of a human crew.“These things would be out there all day,” said F/A-18 Super Hornet pilot Lt Ryan Graves who reported his sightings to the Pentagon and Congress. “Keeping an aircraft in the air requires a significant amount of energy. With the speeds we observed, 12 hours in the air is 11 hours longer than we’d expect.”

• According to the Navy pilots, these UFOs appeared almost daily from the summer of 2014 to March 2015, high in the skies over the East Coast. The pilots reported that the UFOs had no visible engine or infrared exhaust plumes, but could reach 30,000 feet and hypersonic speeds. Some of the incidents were videotaped, including one taken by a plane’s camera in early 2015 that shows an object zooming over the ocean waves as pilots question what they are watching. “Wow, what is that, man?” one pilot exclaims. “Look at it fly!” (see 1:38 minute “Go Fast” video below)

• No one in the Defense Department is saying that the UFOs are extraterrestrial. But they have the attention of the Navy, which earlier this year sent out new classified guidance for how to report what the military calls unexplained aerial phenomena (UAPs), or unidentified flying objects (UFOs).

• Leon Golub, a senior astrophysicist at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, said the possibility of an extraterrestrial cause “is so unlikely that it competes with many other low-probability but more mundane explanations.” He added that “there are so many other possibilities — bugs in the code for the imaging and display systems, atmospheric effects and reflections, neurological overload from multiple inputs during high-speed flight.”

• The UFO sightings were reported to the Pentagon’s Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program, which from 2007 to 2012 analyzed the radar data, video footage and accounts provided by senior officers from the USS Roosevelt. Luis Elizondo, a military intelligence official who ran the program until he resigned in 2017, called the sightings “a striking series of incidents” and included the infamous “Tic Tac” UFO off of the coast of San Diego in 2004. The Navy recently admitted that it still investigates military reports of UFOs.

• Lt Graves and four other Navy pilots, who said in interviews with The New York Times that they saw the objects in 2014 and 2015 in training maneuvers from Virginia to Florida off the aircraft carrier Theodore Roosevelt, make no assertions of the UFOs’ origin. Lieutenants Graves and Accoin, along with former American intelligence officials, appear in a six-part History Channel series, “Unidentified: Inside America’s U.F.O. Investigation,” beginning Friday (May 31st).

 

WASHINGTON — The strange objects, one of them like a spinning top moving against the wind, appeared almost daily from the summer of 2014 to March 2015, high in the skies over the East Coast. Navy pilots reported to their superiors that the objects had no visible engine or infrared exhaust plumes, but that they could reach 30,000 feet and hypersonic speeds.

“These things would be out there all day,” said Lt. Ryan Graves, an F/A-18 Super Hornet pilot who has been with the Navy for 10 years, and who reported his sightings to the Pentagon and Congress. “Keeping an aircraft in the air requires a significant amount of energy. With the speeds we observed, 12 hours in the air is 11 hours longer than we’d expect.”
In late 2014, a Super Hornet pilot had a near collision with one of the objects, and an official mishap report was filed. Some of the incidents were videotaped, including one taken by a plane’s camera in early 2015 that shows an object zooming over the ocean waves as pilots question what they are watching.

“Wow, what is that, man?” one exclaims. “Look at it fly!”

No one in the Defense Department is saying that the objects were extraterrestrial, and experts emphasize that earthly explanations can generally be found for such incidents. Lieutenant Graves and four other Navy pilots, who said in interviews with The New York Times that they saw the objects in 2014 and 2015 in training maneuvers from Virginia to Florida off the aircraft carrier Theodore Roosevelt, make no assertions of their provenance.

But the objects have gotten the attention of the Navy, which earlier this year sent out new classified guidance for how to report what the military calls unexplained aerial phenomena, or unidentified flying objects.

Joseph Gradisher, a Navy spokesman, said the new guidance was an update of instructions that went out to the fleet in 2015, after the Roosevelt incidents.

“There were a number of different reports,” he said. Some cases could have been commercial drones, he said, but in other cases “we don’t know who’s doing this, we don’t have enough data to track this. So the intent of the message to the fleet is to provide updated guidance on reporting procedures for suspected intrusions into our airspace.”

The sightings were reported to the Pentagon’s shadowy, little-known Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program, which analyzed the radar data, video footage and accounts provided by senior officers from the Roosevelt. Luis Elizondo, a military intelligence official who ran the program until he resigned in 2017, called the sightings “a striking series of incidents.”

1:38 minute “Go Fast” Navy cockpit video of UFO flying over the Atlantic
off of the coast of Virginia in 2015 (Global News YouTube channel)

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Harvard Astronomer Stands By His Alien Theory

by Dugan Arnett                     April 3, 2019                     (bostonglobe.com)

• ‘Oumuamua’, a mysterious celestial object that hurtled close to the Earth in 2017, is the first known object to come here from outside the solar system. Rob Weryk, the person who initially spotted Oumuamua at the University of Hawaii, says that there isn’t “any reason to believe that it’s anything but a natural object.”

• But Professor Abraham ‘Avi’ Loeb (pictured above) of Harvard’s Center for Astrophysics noted that the object did not behave like a typical comet or asteroid. If it were a comet, Loeb said, its excess acceleration would have likely been apparent in the form of a tail of dust or gas. Also, its elongated shape is unlike any asteroid or comet observed before. Loeb said he is simply using the available data to draw an evidence-based conclusion. “Let’s put all the possibilities on the table,” Loeb said. Perhaps, Loeb reasoned, the object had been an artificial object sent from an extraterrestrial civilization. “If someone would show me clear evidence that it’s natural in origin, then I would admit it and move on,” he said.

• Loeb’s speculation has drawn the ire of the scientific community. Astrophysicists from across the country have spoken out against Loeb’s theory, painting him as a sensationalist and worse. Some think that Loeb’s assertions will damage the field’s long-term credibility. “[P]eople think that astronomers are just hunting for aliens,” said Paul M. Sutter, astrophysicist at Ohio State University. “The next time we go out to Congress or the public asking for money, there’s going to be a lot of people shaking their heads saying, ‘Oh, you guys are just nutballs.’”

• But Loeb has refused to back down, digging in his heels against what he considers unjust appraisal. His work, he insists, is not the result of some half-baked sci-fi fantasy. The researchers whose opinions Loeb does value have offered support for the idea — even if they’ve been wary of putting their names to it publicly. Loeb argues that scientific study has become far too conservative — avoiding controversial or unpopular examinations in favor of safer subjects that might earn a scientist an award or induction into a prestigious society, but are not necessarily conducive to substantial scientific advances.

• Irwin Shapiro, the former longtime director of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, called Loeb “brilliant.” Stephen Hawking once dined at his home. In 2012, Loeb was named one of the 25 most influential people in space by Time Magazine.

• Loeb was raised in an Israeli farming village. He passed his days reading philosophy books and writing notes to himself. He didn’t move into the field of astrophysics until the age of 26. “The reason I’m different from my colleagues,” he said, “is because I was different from the beginning.”

• In spite of the backlash, Loeb has been happy to field calls from media outlets across the world, and is close to signing a deal for a book on ‘Oumauamua’. Seven different filmmakers have reached to him out about the possibility of doing a film.

 

Like a lot of people, Avi Loeb, the chairman of Harvard University’s renowned astronomy department, does his best thinking in the shower.

It’s where he has hatched ideas for papers on black holes and the future of the universe, and where, last year, he spent some time pondering a notion that would eventually make him — in some circles, at least — the subject of considerable ridicule.

artist’s rendering of ‘Oumuamua’

He’d been thinking about the phenomenon of ‘Oumuamua, a mysterious object that hurtled close to the Earth in 2017. It had become an instant sensation in the scientific community, the first known object from outside the solar system, and astronomers and astrophysicists had jumped to analyze and explain the anomalous object. Theories were developed. Papers were published.

Loeb had a theory, too, and late last year, he detailed it, along with co-author and postdoctoral researcher Shmuel Bialy, in an article for The Astrophysical Journal Letters. Perhaps, he reasoned, the structure had been an artificial object sent from an extraterrestrial civilization.

Almost immediately, the piece ignited the kind of firestorm rarely, if ever, seen in the buttoned-down world of modern-day astronomy.

In the months since the paper’s publication, astrophysicists from across the country have spoken out against Loeb’s theory, painting him as a sensationalist and worse. The researcher who first discovered ‘Oumuamua — Hawaiian for “messenger from afar arriving first” — via telescope has called Loeb’s suggestions “wild speculation.” Another compared Loeb’s logic to that of flat-earthers.

But even as criticism has continued to pour in, Loeb — who is short and slight and wears a near-constant half-smile — has refused to back down, digging in his heels against what he considers unjust appraisal.

He has brushed off much of the negative feedback as the jealous or prejudiced grumblings of scientists he doesn’t respect, adding that the researchers whose opinions he does value have offered support for the idea — even if they’ve been wary of putting their names to it publicly.

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