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Retired Air Force Major Claims Alien Was Killed at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst

Listen to “E96 9-15-19 Retired Air Force Major Claims Alien Was Killed at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst” on Spreaker.
Article by Erik Larsen                    September 3, 2019                       (app.com)

• John L. Guerra has published a book entitled, “Strange Craft: The True Story of an Air Force Intelligence Officer’s Life with UFOs”, wherein Guerra claims that a military police officer shot an extraterrestrial being at Fort Dix in the early morning hours of Jan. 18, 1978. Former Air Force intelligence officer Major George Filer III, now 84 and living in living in Medford, New Jersey with his wife Janet, wrote a top-secret memo about the incident.

• On a cold dark night in January 1978, a soldier was driving a military police vehicle through the woods on the Air Force side of Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst in Burlington County, NJ, in pursuit of a strange, low-flying aircraft that had been observed passing through the military installation’s airspace at about 2 am. Suddenly the soldier realized that an oval-shaped craft radiating a blue-green glow was hovering directly over his vehicle. Then a greyish-brown creature with a big head, long arms and slender body walked out of the nearby shadows and showed itself by stepping into the vehicle’s headlights. The soldier drew his .45 caliber pistol and shot the creature five times, killing it. Its remains gave off a foul-smelling, ammonia-like stench. A cleanup crew from Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Ohio flew in to retrieve the body. The retrieval crew acted as if this occurrence was not out of the ordinary.

• Major Filer arrived on base before dawn that day to prepare his daily intelligence briefing for his superior officers. Security at the base had been tightened and Filer personally observed the emergency response in the aftermath of the incident. Filer interviewed witnesses but was denied access to photos taken at the scene. The senior master sergeant on duty told Filer, “An alien has been shot at Fort Dix and they found it on the end of our (McGuire AFB) runway.” Filer asked, “Was it an alien from another country?” “No,” said the master sergeant. “[I]t was from outer space, a space alien. There are UFOs buzzing around the pattern like mad.”

• The Air Force classified everything as top secret and silenced the witnesses through national security restrictions and good old-fashioned intimidation. Everyone, that is, except Filer who has spoken publicly of the incident ever since. The local newspaper, The Trentonian, first reported about the incident in July 2007. The Air Force has repeatedly denied the claim, however, telling the newspaper that “the case was discredited as a hoax years ago.”

• The official explanation for the “misidentification” was that, in 1978, people were in a UFO frenzy with the US/USSR Space Race and the Apollo Moon missions still fresh in everyone’s minds. Earlier that year, Steven Spielberg had released his blockbuster movie, “Close Encounters of the Third Kind”, and the movie “Star Wars” had been in theaters the previous year. UFO sightings had greater credibility back then. There were 377 references to UFOs published in the press between 1977 and 1978, compared to 85 references between 2017 and 2018. Even President Jimmy Carter had acknowledged that he had seen a UFO and pledged to uncover whatever secrets about UFOs the government may have been hiding.

• Then there were the strange booms heard in the sky over the Jersey Shore and much of the East Coast between December 1977 and March 1978, which had the population on edge. One boom was so loud that it caused a tremor in southern Ocean County and the evacuation of the Oyster Creek nuclear power plant in Lacey, NJ. The booms were blamed on sonic booms from the supersonic British-French airliner, the Concorde, flying out of JFK Airport. However, subsequent booms did not conform to the Concorde’s schedule.

• Whatever happened at McGuire Air Force Base on Jan. 18, 1978, it is now part of folklore. While Filer never actually saw the dead alien, he says that he knows for a fact that the story is true. Filer claims to have seen UFOs throughout his entire life, starting at age 5 outside his boyhood home in Illinois. He later served as the state director for MUFON in New Jersey. (See a 48 minute video of George Filer describing the Fort Dix incident below.)

 

Was an alien shot and killed in the Pine Barrens of New Jersey?

A new book, titled “Strange Craft: The True Story of an Air Force Intelligence Officer’s Life with UFOs,” claims that a military police officer shot an extraterrestrial being at Fort Dix in the early morning hours of Jan. 18, 1978.

In the book by author John L. Guerra and published by Bayshore Publishing Co. of Tampa, Florida, retired Air Force Major George Filer III — a decorated former intelligence officer for the 21st Air Force, Military Airlift Command at the adjacent McGuire Air Force Base — recounts the extraordinary tale from America’s disco age.

              Ret. Major George Filer III

Filer, now 84 and living in Medford with his wife, Janet, said what has been an urban legend first promulgated by UFO enthusiasts since the early 1980s is indeed true. That’s because he was there and wrote a top-secret memo about it, he said.

In the freezing winter darkness of that day in January 1978, a bipedal creature, described as about 4 feet in height and grayish-brown in color, with a “fat head, long arms and slender body,” was shot to death with five rounds fired from a service member’s .45-caliber (military issue M1911A1) handgun.

As Guerra explains it in his book, the soldier had originally been in a police pickup truck, driving through the wilderness of the base in pursuit of a strange, low-flying aircraft that had been observed passing through the military installation’s airspace about 2 a.m. that morning.

About an hour into the drive, the soldier became aware — in typical, horror movie fashion — that the craft, oval-shaped and radiating a blue-green glow, was hovering directly over his vehicle.

That’s when the “creature” emerged from the shadows on foot, revealing itself to the soldier by stepping into the beams of the vehicle’s headlights where the panicked MP drew his weapon, ordered the alien to freeze, and he fired.

According to the retired major as told in the book, the alleged alien succumbed to its gunshot wounds on the Air Force side of what is now Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst in Burlington County; its remains giving off a foul-smelling, ammonia-like stench.

Later that morning, a cleanup crew from Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Ohio — headquarters of the National Air and Space Intelligence Center — flew in to retrieve the body, behaving as if the creature was, well, not entirely alien to them.

The Asbury Park Press reached out to the Air Force at the Joint Base for comment about this story, but never heard back.

48 minute video of incident at Fort Dix with George Filer (Delinda Jeffry YouTube)

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Meet J. Allen Hynek, the Astronomer Who First Classified UFO ‘Close Encounters’

by Greg Daugherty                      November 19, 2018                      (history.com)

• In 1947, a rash of reports of UFOs had the public on edge. The Air Force created Project Sign to investigate these UFO sightings. But they needed outside expertise to sift through the reports and come up with explanations for all of these sightings. Enter J. Allen Hynek.

• In 1948, Hynek was the 37-year-old director at Ohio State University’s McMillin Observatory. He had worked for the government during WWII developing new defense technologies for the war effort with a high security clearance. The Air Force approached him to be a consultant on ‘flying saucers’ for the government. “I had scarcely heard of UFOs in 1948 and, like every other scientist I knew, assumed that they were nonsense,” Hynek recalled.

• Hynek’s UFO investigations under Project Sign resulted in twenty percent of the 237 cases that couldn’t be explained. In February 1949, Project Sign was succeeded by Project Grudge, which said Hynek, “took as its premise that UFOs simply could not be.” The 1949 Grudge report concluded that the phenomena posed no danger to the United States, and warranted no further study.

• But UFO incidents continued, even from the Air Force’s own radar operators. The national media began treating the phenomenon more seriously. The Air Force had little choice but to revive Project Grudge under a new name: Project Blue Book. Hynek joined Project Blue Book in 1952 and would remain with it until its demise in 1969. But he had changed his mind about the existence of UFOs. “The witnesses I interviewed could have been lying, could have been insane or could have been hallucinating collectively—but I do not think so,” he recalled in 1977. Hynek deplored the ridicule that people who reported a UFO sighting often had to endure, causing untold numbers of others to never come forward, not to mention the loss of useful research data.

• “Given the controversial nature of the subject, it’s understandable that both scientists and witnesses are reluctant to come forward,” said Jacques Vallee, co-author with Dr. Hynek of The Edge of Reality: A Progress Report on Unidentified Flying Objects.

• On October 4, 1957, the Soviet Union surprised the world by launching Sputnik, a serious blow to Americans’ sense of technological superiority. Hynek was on TV assuring Americans that their scientists were closely monitoring the situation. UFO sightings continued unabated.

• In the 1960s, Hynek was the top expert on UFOs as scientific consultant to Project Blue Book. But he chafed at what he perceived as the project’s mandate to debunk UFO sightings, and the inadequate resources at his disposal. Air Force Major Hector Quintanilla, who headed the project from 1963 to 1969, writes that he considered Hynek a “liability.”

• Hynek frustrated UFO debunkers such as the U.S. Air Force. But in 1966, after suggesting that a UFO sighting in Michigan may have been an optical illusion created by swamp gas, he became a punchline for UFO believers as well.

• In his testimony for a Congressional hearing in 1966, Hynek stated, “[I]t is my opinion that the body of data accumulated since 1948…deserves close scrutiny by a civilian panel of physical and social scientists…”. The Air Force established a civilian committee of scientists to investigate UFOs, chaired by physicist, Dr. Edward U. Condon. In 1968, Hynek assailed the Condon Report’s conclusion that “further extensive study of UFOs probably cannot be justified.” In 1969, Project Blue Book shut down for good.

• UFO sightings continued around the world. Hynek later quipped, “apparently [they] did not read the Condon Report”. Hynek went on with his research, free from the compromises and bullying of the U.S. Air Force.

• In 1972, Hynek published his first book, The UFO Experience. It introduced Hynek’s classifications of UFO incidents, which he called Close Encounters. Close Encounters of the First Kind meant UFOs seen at a close enough range to make out some details. In a Close Encounter of the Second Kind, the UFO had a physical effect, such as scorching trees, frightening animals or causing car motors to suddenly conk out. In Close Encounters of the Third Kind, witnesses reported seeing occupants in or near a UFO.

• In 1977, Steven Spielberg released the movie, Close Encounters of the Third Kind. Hynek was paid $1,000 for the use of the title, another $1,000 for the rights to use stories from the book and $1,500 for three days of technical consulting. He also had a brief cameo in the film, playing an awestruck scientist when the alien spacecraft comes into view.

• In 1978, Hynek retired from teaching. In 1973 he had founded the Center for UFO Studies which continues to this day. Hynek died in 1986, at age 75, from a brain tumor.

 

It’s September 1947, and the U.S. Air Force has a problem. A rash of reports about mysterious objects in the skies has the public on edge and the military baffled. The Air Force needs to figure out what’s going on—and fast. It launches an investigation it calls Project Sign.

By early 1948 the team realizes it needs some outside expertise to sift through the reports it’s receiving—specifically an astronomer who can determine which cases are easily explained by astronomical phenomena, such as planets, stars or meteors.

For J. Allen Hynek, then the 37-year-old director at Ohio State University’s McMillin Observatory, it would be a classic case of being in the right place at the right time—or, as he may have occasionally lamented, the wrong place at the wrong one.

The adventure begins

Hynek had worked for the government during the war, developing new defense technologies like the first radio-controlled fuse, so he already had a high security clearance and was a natural go-to.

“One day I had a visit from several men from the technical center at Wright-Patterson Air Force base, which was only 60 miles away in Dayton,” Hynek later wrote. “With some obvious embarrassment, the men eventually brought up the subject of ‘flying saucers’ and asked me if I would care to serve as consultant to the Air Force on the matter… The job didn’t seem as though it would take too much time, so I agreed.”

Little did Hynek realize that he was about to begin a lifelong odyssey that would make him one of the most famous and, at times, controversial scientists of the 20 century. Nor could he have guessed how much his own thinking about UFOs would change over that period as he persisted in bringing rigorous scientific inquiry to the subject.

“I had scarcely heard of UFOs in 1948 and, like every other scientist I knew, assumed that they were nonsense,” he recalled.

Project Sign ran for a year, during which the team reviewed 237 cases. In Hynek’s final report, he noted that about 32 percent of incidents could be attributed to astronomical phenomena, while another 35 percent had other explanations, such as balloons, rockets, flares or birds. Of the remaining 33 percent, 13 percent didn’t offer enough evidence to yield an explanation. That left 20 percent that provided investigators with some evidence but still couldn’t be explained.

The Air Force was loath to use the term “unidentified flying object,” so the mysterious 20 percent were simply classified as “unidentified.”

In February 1949, Project Sign was succeeded by Project Grudge. While Sign offered at least a pretense of scientific objectivity, Grudge seems to have been dismissive from the start, just as its angry-sounding name suggests. Hynek, who played no role in Project Grudge, said it “took as its premise that UFOs simply could not be.” Perhaps not surprisingly, its report, issued at the end of 1949, concluded that the phenomena posed no danger to the United States, having resulted from mass hysteria, deliberate hoaxes, mental illness or conventional objects that the witnesses had misinterpreted as otherworldly. It also suggested the subject wasn’t worth further study.

Project Blue Book is born

That might’ve been the end of it. But UFO incidents continued, including some puzzling reports from the Air Force’s own radar operators. The national media began treating the phenomenon more seriously; LIFE magazine did a 1952 cover story, and even the widely respected TV journalist Edward R. Murrow devoted a program to the topic, including an interview with Kenneth Arnold, a pilot whose 1947 sighting of mysterious objects over Mount Rainier in Washington state popularized the term “flying saucer.” The Air Force had little choice but to revive Project Grudge, which soon morphed into the more benignly named Project Blue Book.

Hynek joined Project Blue Book in 1952 and would remain with it until its demise in 1969. For him, it was a side gig as he continued to teach and to pursue other, non-UFO research, at Ohio State. In 1960 he moved to Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois, to chair its astronomy department.

As before, Hynek’s role was to review the reports of UFO sightings and determine whether there was a logical astronomical explanation. Typically that involved a lot of unglamorous paperwork; but now and then, for an especially puzzling case, he had a chance to get out into the field.

There he discovered something he might never have learned from simply reading the files: how normal the people who reported seeing UFOs tended to be. “The witnesses I interviewed could have been lying, could have been insane or could have been hallucinating collectively—but I do not think so,” he recalled in his 1977 book, The Hynek UFO Report.

“Their standing in the community, their lack of motive for perpetration of a hoax, their own puzzlement at the turn of events they believe they witnessed, and often their great reluctance to speak of the experience—all lend a subjective reality to their UFO experience.”

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Devil’s Tower UFO Rendezvous Begins

by Al Van Zee                      September 12, 2018                       (keloland.com)

• UFO enthusiasts are gathering for ‘The Devil’s Tower UFO Rendezvous’ this weekend in Hulett, Wyoming, the site made famous by the Spielberg movie, “Close Encounters of the Third Kind”.

• UFO investigator David Marler says that people have been seeing strange sights in the sky for a very long time and there is compelling evidence that intelligently operated UFOs are real. “[I]t goes beyond just eyewitness testimony. Many of these cases including military cases, involve radar and I mean multiple radar; ground-based radar, airborne radar, airborne visual sightings, ground-based visual sightings,” Marler said.

• Several astronauts have also reported airborne objects they couldn’t identify. “When you have much corroborative testimony, you have to look at this in a serious light and try to figure out what we’re dealing with,” says Marler.

Above our heads at night are millions of stars with millions of planets that scientists now say stand a good chance of containing life. There may even be intelligent life.

But the important question is: has it paid us a visit?

It’s a subject that will be reviewed in depth at the Devils Town UFO Rendezvous. That location was chosen because of a movie called Close Encounters of the Third Kind which was filmed there 41 years ago.

The storyline is that an alien civilization chose to make contact with the human race at this formation in the northwestern Black Hills.

That’s fiction of course. But people have been seeing strange sights in the sky for a very long time. And some UFO investigators such as David Marler think there is compelling evidence that they are real.

“And it goes beyond just eyewitness testimony. Many of these cases including military cases, involve radar and I mean multiple radar; ground-based radar, airborne radar, airborne visual sightings, ground-based visual sightings,” Author and UFO Investigator David Marler said.

Several astronauts have also reported airborne objects they couldn’t identify.

“When you have much corroborative testimony, you have to look at this in a serious light and try to figure out what we’re dealing with,” Marler said.

2:24 minute video clip by CBS affiliate KELO-TV in Sioux Falls, SD

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