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UFO Sightings Frequently Reported Across Western Pennsylvania

Listen to “E63 8-11-19 UFO Sightings Frequently Reported Across Western Pennsylvania” on Spreaker.
Article by Stephen Huba                      July 27, 2019                      (triblive.com)

• Retired journalist Bob Gatty, 76, originally reported on the Kecksburg UFO incident for the Greensburg Tribune-Review, when on December 9th, 1965, people across six states and Canada reported seeing a fireball streak across the sky before crashing into a wooded area in Mt. Pleasant Township, Pennsylvania, a southeastern suburb of Pittsburgh. (Note: The Army and State Police cordoned off the area, and claimed that they found nothing there in the woods. But locals have come forward to say they saw a military truck removing an acorn-shaped object the size of a Volkswagen Beetle with hieroglyphics on it.)

• The Kecksburg UFO sighting has become part of local lore, but Gatty says, “It’s not going away. Whether you believe or don’t believe in this stuff, the fact remains there is a lot happening for some reason.” Reports of unexplained aerial phenomena are getting serious attention from Congress, the U.S. military and longtime UFO watchers. “Congress apparently is taking this stuff… seriously,” says Gatty.

• UFO researcher Stan Gordon, 69, has spent the past 54 years investigating the Kecksburg incident. Gordon says that there has been a recent “surge” in sightings of unexplained phenomena in Western Pennsylvania. Says Gordon, “We’ve had a surge of UFO and Bigfoot activity in the area in the last couple of weeks. Many of these sightings are very detailed reports… from credible people that you cannot easily dismiss.” Most end up in the growing repository of unexplained phenomena, with no conclusive explanation.

• Gordon continues to report UFO sightings in Pennsylvania on his website, StanGordon.info. Pennsylvania is ranked seventh in total UFO sightings in the U.S., with 3,937 UFOs reported since 1947. There have been 84 sightings so far in 2019, which already matches the total for 2018. The most recent was a sighting over Greensburg on July 5th of a red/orange round object moving across the sky at night, lasting about six minutes.

• On July 4th, an orange-red sphere was spotted at night in both Erie and Cecil, in Washington County. On June 28th, a shiny silver saucer was seen over Mt. Lebanon. After about 15 minutes, it disappeared. On June 23rd, an Elizabeth resident reported seeing five amber-colored, circular shapes move in all directions in the sky, and then form an arrowhead shape before disappearing after about 4 minutes.

• Peter Davenport, director for the National UFO Reporting Center, has been collecting UFO data for 25 years. In 2004, Davenport presented a paper to the Mutual UFO Network on the use of “passive radar” for detecting UFOs in the near-earth environment. This was acknowledged by the CIA and the FBI. Davenport says that the US government has known about the UFO phenomenon for a long time. Solving the mystery of UFOs will require “a government that still serves the people”.

• UFO sightings by Navy fighter pilots have reached the highest echelons of the US government, according to the ‘To the Stars Academy of Arts & Science’. Former Pentagon intelligence official Christopher Mellon, an adviser to the Academy, wrote in the Washington Post in 2018 that the existence of UFOs is no longer in question. What is lacking is a commitment from the Defense Department to investigate the growing body of evidence from the military. Said Mellon, “It is time to set aside taboos regarding ‘UFOs’ and instead listen to our pilots and radar operators.”

 

While the Kecksburg UFO sighting has become a quaint part of local lore, more recent reports of unexplained aerial phenomena are getting serious attention from Congress, the U.S. military and longtime UFO watchers.

reproduction of Kecksburg “acorn” UFO

“It’s not going away,” said retired journalist Bob Gatty. “Whether you believe or don’t believe in this stuff, the fact remains there is a lot happening for some reason.”

                Bob Gatty

Gatty, who originally reported on the Kecksburg incident for the Tribune-Review in 1965, recently noted on his blog NotFakeNews.biz that the Navy has issued new guidelines to fighter pilots regarding UFO sightings, and members of Congress are seeking more frequent briefings on the subject.

“Congress apparently is taking this stuff — at least the Navy reports — seriously,” said Gatty, 76, a former Sykesville, Jefferson County, resident who lives in Myrtle Beach, S.C.

Meanwhile, longtime local UFO researcher Stan Gordon said there has been a “surge” in sightings of unexplained phenomena in Western Pennsylvania — whether extraterrestrial or not.

Stan Gordon

“We keep getting reports of very strange things that people see around here,” said Gordon, 69, of Greensburg. “We’ve had a surge of UFO and Bigfoot activity in the area in the last couple of weeks. Many of these sightings are very detailed reports.”

While sightings usually spike in the spring and summer, when people are outside more, reports in 2018 and 2019 have been more consistently year-round, he said. Sightings are mostly of unexplained things in the sky or of earthbound cryptids — animals such as Bigfoot, whose existence is unsubstantiated.

Gordon has spent the past 54 years investigating the Kecksburg incident, when on Dec. 9, 1965, people across six states and Canada reported seeing a fireball streak across the sky before crashing into a wooded area in Mt. Pleasant Township.

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Harry Reid Wants Hearings on What the Military Knows About UFOs: ‘They Would Be Surprised How the American Public Would Accept It’

Former Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid told KNPR, he wishes lawmakers would hold public hearings into what the military knows about UFOs

by Chris Ciaccia                  June 14, 2019                   (foxnews.com)

• Former Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev pictured above) told KNPR, the National Public Radio affiliate in Las Vegas, he wishes lawmakers would hold public hearings into what the military knows about UFOs. “They would be surprised how the American public would accept it,” Reid said on air.

• Reid himself was the lawmaker behind the $22M funding for the Pentagon’s AATIP UFO study program from 2007 to 2012, as reported by the New York Times in December 2017. (see article here) “That money was spent developing page after page of information,” said Reid. “[T]here’s been a lot of activity since that.” Reid says that he sees this as a national security issue, noting that he believes both Russia and China are looking into the issue. Last month, the Pentagon admitted to the New York Post that it is still actively investigating claimed sightings of alien spacecraft. (see article here)

• This past April, the US Navy announced new guidelines for Navy personnel reporting encounters with “unidentified aircraft” in response to more sightings of unknown, advanced aircraft flying into or near Navy strike groups or other sensitive military facilities. (see article here)

• On Fox News & Friends, former Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Intelligence Christopher Mellon remarked, “We know that UFOs exist. This is no longer an issue.” “The issue is why are they here? Where are they coming from and what is the technology behind these devices that we are observing?” (see article here)

• In January, the Defense Intelligence Agency revealed its funding of projects investigating wormholes, alternate dimensions, and other advanced propulsion technology research topics associated with UFOs (see article here).

 

Nearly two years after it was reported that the Pentagon set up a secret program to investigate UFOs at the request of former Sen. Majority Leader Harry Reid, the former senator is clamoring for Congress to look into what the military knows about their existence.

Speaking with Nevada’s KNPR, Reid said he wishes lawmakers would hold public hearings into what the military knows.

“They would be surprised how the American public would accept it,” he said during the wide-ranging interview. “People from their individual states would accept it.”

Reid, who was able to get $22 million in funding for the study of military sightings of UFOs, said that his office produced a plethora of reports on the subject.

“That money was spent developing page after page of information,” he added. “Where people in the past had seen things and not one person but hundreds of people as a result of that there’s been a lot of activity since that.”

Reid mentioned that he would like further research into a topic he sees as a national security issue, noting that he believes both Russia and China are looking into the issue.

In December 2017, both The New York Times and Politico published stories that revealed the existence of the Pentagon’s now-defunct Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program. The New York Times said the UFO program began in 2007, while Politico reported it began in 2009.

Last month, the Pentagon admitted to the New York Post that it is still actively investigating claimed sightings of alien spacecraft, despite claiming that it shut down the AATIP program in 2012.

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FAIR USE NOTICE: This page contains copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. ExoNews.org distributes this material for the purpose of news reporting, educational research, comment and criticism, constituting Fair Use under 17 U.S.C § 107. Please contact the Editor at ExoNews with any copyright issue.

 

Just Don’t Call Them UFOs

by Marina Koren                     April 27, 2019                      (theatlantic.com)


• Apparently, enough incidents have occurred in “various military-controlled ranges and designated airspace” in recent years to cause members of Congress to ask questions and to prompt military officials to establish a formal system to collect and analyze the unexplained phenomena. The U.S. Navy is drafting new rules for Navy officials and pilots to report such sightings. The Navy is trying to assure its pilots that they won’t be laughed out of the cockpit or deemed unhinged if they bring it up.

• While the Navy indicates it’s willing to discuss the taboo topic, it is loath to make any reference to “UFOs”. Instead, they’re called “unexplained aerial phenomena,” “unidentified aircraft,” “unauthorized aircraft,” and, perhaps most intriguing, “suspected incursions.” This is peculiar since it was the military that came up with the phrase “unidentified flying objects” in the first place.

• Government programs dedicated to investigating UFO sightings in the late 1940s treated UFO sightings as a big joke. As a rule, officials dismissed and debunked any reports as hoaxes and hallucinations. The military created Project Blue Book to investigate claims of strange objects in the sky. Its director, Edward Ruppelt, introduced the term ‘unidentified flying object’ sometime around 1953. The definition carried no hint of extraterrestrial life.

• Edward Ruppelt probably didn’t imagine the journey his three-letter abbreviation would take over the years. Military reports were careful to avoid any mention of the dreaded ‘UFO’. In 1955, Ruppelt wrote: “… facts have been obscured by secrecy and confusion, a situation that has led to wild speculation on one end of the scale and an almost dangerously blasé attitude on the other.”

• Notwithstanding, UFOs infiltrated the public consciousness. They sailed into Hollywood with stories about aliens, from friendly creatures to nightmarish monsters. The lines between fiction and reality blurred. People told harrowing stories of nighttime abductions. UFOs became the focus of conspiracy theories about government secrecy. The people who believed in UFOs and aliens were regarded as ‘crazies’, a lasting stigma surrounding UFO truthers.

• After two decades in operation, Project Blue Book eventually concluded there was “no evidence that [UFOs] were intelligently guided spacecraft from beyond the Earth.” They attributed most sightings to clouds, weather balloons, and even birds. And any project that studied UFO was deemed a waste of time and money.

• Christopher Mellon, a former deputy assistant secretary of defense for intelligence in the Clinton and Bush administrations and an advocate for UFO study, has said service members worry that reporting UFOs puts their careers at risk. They also worry that staying silent could threaten national security, in case one of those mysterious objects turns out to be a new form of aircraft from a rival country. “Nobody wants to be ‘the alien guy’ in the national-security bureaucracy,” Mellon wrote in a Washington Post op-ed last year. “Nobody wants to be ridiculed or sidelined for drawing attention to the issue.”

 

Pilots are about to receive a new memo from management: If you encounter an unidentified flying object while on the job, please tell us.

The U.S. Navy is drafting new rules for reporting such sightings, according to a recent story from Politico. Apparently, enough incidents have occurred in “various military-controlled ranges and designated airspace” in recent years to prompt military officials to establish a formal system to collect and analyze the unexplained phenomena. Members of Congress and their staffs have even started asking about the claims, and Navy officials and pilots have responded with formal briefings.

The Washington Post provided more details in its own story: In some cases, pilots—many of whom are engineers and academy graduates—claimed to observe small spherical objects flying in formation. Others say they’ve seen white, Tic Tac–shaped vehicles. Aside from drones, all engines rely on burning fuel to generate power, but these vehicles all had no air intake, no wind and no exhaust.

The Navy knows how this sounds. It knows what you must be thinking. But the fact stands that some pilots are saying they’ve seen strange things in the sky, and that’s concerning. So the Navy is trying to assure pilots that they won’t be laughed out of the cockpit or deemed unhinged if they bring it up. “For safety and security concerns, the Navy and the [U.S. Air Force] takes these reports very seriously and investigates each and every report,” the Navy said in a statement to Politico.

Yet even as the Navy indicates it’s willing to discuss the taboo topic, it’s also shying away from three notorious little letters. UFO carries an airport’s worth of baggage, bursting with urban legends, government secrecy, and over-the-top Hollywood movies. The statements and quotes that the Navy provided to news outlets are devoid of any reference to UFOs. Instead, they’re called “unexplained aerial phenomena,” “unidentified aircraft,” “unauthorized aircraft,” and, perhaps most intriguing, “suspected incursions.”

The message is, if you see something, say something, but for God’s sake, lower your voice. Don’t call it a UFO. Which is funny, since the military came up with the name in the first place.

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