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The Dark Connection Between UFOs and Grisly US Mutilations

 

Article by Colin Bertram                    January 10, 2020                       (history.com)

• Reports of unexplained mutilations carried out on animals in the US Western and Midwestern states have baffled investigators for decades. Incidents of mutilated cattle, sheep, horses, rabbits, deer, bison and elk with the bloodless corpses, often lacking jaw flesh, eyes, ears, tongue, lymph nodes and genitalia, have been reported since the early 1970s. Many have speculated that the perpetrators might be otherworldly beings conducting biological experiments on Earth’s inhabitants.

• In 2009, The Denver Post reported four calves were found mutilated in similar ways. NPR reported on a 2019 incident in (Oregon) in which five young purebred bulls showed up dead, drained of blood and with body parts cleanly excised. (see Exoarticle here) “A lot of people lean toward the aliens,” Harney County Sherriff’s Deputy Dan Jenkins told NPR. “One caller told us to look for…a depression under the carcass, ‘cause he said that the alien ships will kinda beam the cow up and do whatever they are going to do with it. Then they just drop from a great height.”

• Author Ben Mezrich writes in his book, The 37th Parallel: The Secret Truth Behind America’s UFO Highway, that dating back at least 50 years, some 10,000 cattle have been mutilated in the Midwest area along latitude line 37. No official answer has ever been given for these strange incidents, and they remain unsolved. But these aren’t limited to animal mutilations. There are compelling incidents of human beings similarly mutilated.

• In March 1956, Air Force sergeant Jonathan P. Lovette was assisting Major William Cunningham at the White Sands missile testing grounds near Holloman Air Force Base in New Mexico, searching for scattered debris from a recent rocket test. Suddenly, Cunningham heard a loud scream. He crossed over a dune and saw Lovette being dragged by a long serpentine arm wrapped around his legs, connected to a silver disk hovering in the air 15 feet above him. Cunningham watched as Lovette was pulled inside the craft, which then rose up into the sky.

• According to Military Encounters With Extraterrestrials: The Real War of the Worlds by Frank Joseph, Holloman Air Force base personnel confirmed an unidentified radar contact that day. Search parties were dispatched to the desert. Three days later, Lovette’s nude corpse was discovered 10 miles from the abduction site. The Air Force investigated the case under Project Grunge, a short-lived precursor to the better-known Project Blue Book, which allegedly resulted in a 600-page document labeled “Project Grudge Report 13.” Problem is, though Grudge Reports 1 through 12 have been declassified, along with Report 14, there is no official mention or accounting of Report 13. The U.S. government denies its very existence.

• Two men came forward to say that they had actually read ‘Report 13’. William Cooper said that in the early 1970s, he was tasked with analyzing an annotated version of Grudge Report 13. Former Green Beret captain William English says he too was asked to analyze the document while assigned to a US Air Force base in England. English dictated two audio cassettes outlining what he remembered from Report 13, as documented in Joseph’s Military Encounters. Cooper’s and English’s accounts closely match one another.

• According to Report 13, Lovette’s body had been cleanly mutilated. His tongue had been cut from the lower portion of the jaw, his eyes gouged out and his anus removed. The body had been completely drained of blood, but there was no vascular collapse usually associated with death by bleeding. English alleges that the coroner remarked on the apparent surgical skill used to remove the organs—in particular that the anus and genitalia had been neatly extracted like a plug.

• In 1988, a human body was found at the Guarapiranga Reservoir in Brazil. According to reports, the victim had been dead for 48 to 72 hours, but there was no sign of decomposition. The eyes, ears, tongue and genitalia had been removed, as had the digestive organs. Officials were never able to identify the victim.

 

The details are both grisly and strangely surgical: corpses found under the open sky with their eyes plucked out, tongues removed and private parts excised—all extracted with the utmost precision and leaving not a drop of blood.

Reports of such unexplained mutilations, carried out on both humans and animals, have baffled investigators for decades, leading to speculation about whether the perpetrators might be otherworldly beings conducting biological experiments on earth’s inhabitants. While scores of reports have emerged from U.S. western and midwestern states detailing mysterious bloodless animal mutilations, human cases have been far less common—and often much sketchier in their documentation.

The enigmatic ‘Project Grudge Report No. 13’

One of the most shocking cases, the Lovette-Cunningham incident, involves an American Air Force sergeant allegedly abducted by a saucer-like aircraft, after which his cleanly mutilated body was found in the New Mexico desert. In ufology circles, reports have circulated that the case was studied by Project Grudge, one of the earliest U.S. Air Force programs tasked with investigating sightings of unidentified flying objects in the years after World War II. (Project Grudge was a short-lived precursor to the better known Project Blue Book, which ran from 1951 to 1969, many documents from which are now declassified.) The result of the Air Force investigation into the purported abduction was allegedly a 600-page document labeled “Project Grudge Report 13.”

Problem is, no official information on Report 13 exists and the U.S. government denies its very existence, so its details are known only from second-hand sources who claim to have seen and analyzed the document. One account came from controversial conspiracy theorist William Cooper (1943–2001), who asserts he was tasked with analyzing an annotated version of Grudge Report 13 in the early 1970s. The other came from William English, a former Green Beret captain who says he too was asked to analyze the document, while assigned to a U.S. security service at a former Royal Air Force base in Chicksands, England.

English dictated two audio cassettes outlining what he remembered from Report 13, and according to Military Encounters With Extraterrestrials: The Real War of the Worlds by author Frank Joseph, English also participated in a 1991 Colorado radio broadcast where he discussed his findings. Cooper’s and English’s stories echo one another closely.

A terrifying abduction, a curious autopsy

Both recount an alleged incident of March 1956 involving Air Force sergeant Jonathan P. Lovette, who was assisting Major William Cunningham in the White Sands missile testing grounds near Holloman Air Force Base in New Mexico. While searching for scattered debris from a recent rocket test, Cunningham was shocked when he heard a loud scream. Thinking Lovette had perhaps been bitten by a snake, English recounts Cunningham crossed the dune to aid his partner when he purportedly witnessed one of the more bizarre human-extraterrestrial encounters.

Instead of finding Lovette nursing a snake bite, Cunningham, according to English, recounted seeing the soldier being dragged by a long serpentine arm, wrapped around his legs, connected to a silver disk hovering in the air 15 to 20 feet away. Cunningham watched, frozen in horror, as Lovette was pulled inside the craft, which then rose vertically into the sky. The major then stumbled toward his jeep and radioed for assistance.

Security teams arrived and the disturbed Cunningham was confined to the base hospital for observation and treatment after retelling what he believed he witnessed. According to Joseph’s Military Encounters book, base personnel did confirm an unidentified radar contact near Holloman at the time Lovette vanished. The base dispatched search parties into the desert, but it would be three days before Lovette’s nude corpse was discovered—some 10 miles from the site of the alleged abduction. From all indications the body had been exposed to the elements for 24 to 48 hours. According to English, the report offered no explanation of what might account for the missing third day, and the autopsy performed on Lovette raised more questions than delivered answers.

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George Adamski Got Famous Sharing UFO Photos and Alien ‘Encounters’

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Article by Greg Daugherty                           January 9, 2020                           (history.com)

• George Adamski is perhaps the most famous UFO contactee and is certainly one of the most controversial characters in UFO history. Throughout his life, Adamski took photos of UFOs, wrote books and told stories of his encounters with human-like extraterrestrials from other planets in our solar system, gaining international fame as well as criticism.

• Adamski was born in Poland in 1891, coming to the U.S. with his parents and growing up in northern New York state. He had little formal education. In 1934, he told a Los Angeles Times reporter that he had lived in Tibet as a child, and planned to establish the first Tibetan monastery in Laguna Beach, California. In 1936, he told the newspapers that he was going to establish the world headquarters of an organization called ‘Universal Progressive Christianity’ in Laguna Beach. He also offered a tax plan to end the Great Depression in 1938.

• After World War II, Adamski’s ambitions turned to UFOs. In October 1946, he spotted his first UFO – a motionless black cigar-shaped craft. In August 1947, he witnessed a procession of 184 UFOs in the sky. By 1949, he’d attached a camera to his six-inch telescope and began scanning the skies. Adamski estimated that he took about 500 flying saucer photos, from which he got a dozen good quality shots. Newspapers and magazines published Adamski’s photos, and he gave lectures on UFOs. He also operated a tiny restaurant with a small telescope set up out back (in a rural area between Los Angeles and San Diego).

• In 1952, Adamski reported that he had met and conversed with a visitor from Venus in a California desert using a combination of hand gestures and mental telepathy, which he recounted in his 1953 book: Flying Saucers Have Landed. His 1955 sequel: Inside the Space Ships, recounted meeting human-like emissaries from Mars and Saturn. Adamski claimed that every planet in our solar system had human-like inhabitants, as did a base on the dark side of the Earth’s Moon.

• In his books, Adamski claimed that his extraterrestrial friends took him aboard a scout ship, flew him to a mother ship hovering over the Earth, gave him a ride around the Moon, and treated him to a colorful travelogue about life on Venus. He said that a 1,000 year-old man shared with him the secrets of the universe, some of which he was not allowed to divulge back on Earth.

• Adamski recounted his meeting in November 1952 with a human-like visitor from Venus in a remote part of the California desert. “The beauty of his form surpassed anything I had ever seen,” said Adamski. “(His) hair was sandy in color and hung in beautiful waves to his shoulders, glistening more beautifully than any woman’s I have ever seen.” The Venusian had come to deliver a message: ‘Earthlings should stop messing around with atomic bombs before they destroy their entire planet.’

• Project Bluebook investigator J. Allen Hynek called Adamski’s flying saucer photos ‘crude fakes’. Hynek’s Bluebook partner, Edward J. Ruppelt, visited Adamski’s restaurant in 1953 to find Adamski hawking his UFO photos. While Ruppelt didn’t believe him, he wrote that he was impressed all the same. “To look at the man and to listen to his story, you had an immediate urge to believe him,” said Ruppelt, … he had “the most honest pair of eyes I’ve ever seen.” SciFi writer Arthur C. Clarke also denounced Adamski’s work and called his believers “nitwits.” But in 1959, Queen Juliana of the Netherlands invited Adamski to her palace to discuss extraterrestrials. Adamski is said to have also had a secret meeting with the Pope in 1963.

• In 1961, Adamski published his last book: Flying Saucers Farewell, and continued to lecture widely. In 1965, Adamski predicted that a large fleet of flying saucers would soon descend on Washington, D.C. He died in April 1965 at age 74.

• Since his death, Adamski’s critics have tended to portray him as a harmless, small-time con artist. Others like Arthur C. Clarke and J. Allen Hynek have accused Adamski of discrediting the entire field of UFO research. But Adamski stuck by his story to the end. In his first book, Adamski gave an upbeat but ominous message: “Let us be friendly. Let us recognize and welcome the men from other worlds! They are here among us.”

 

To some, he was a prophet. To others, a laughing stock. Even today, more than half a century after his death, George Adamski remains one of the most curious and controversial characters in UFO history.

Adamski had multiple claims to UFO fame. Starting in the late 1940s, he took countless photos of what he insisted were flying saucers. But experts, including J. Allen Hynek, scientific consultant to the Air Force’s Cold War-era UFO investigation team Project Blue Book, dismissed them as crude fakes.

                 George Adamski

Then, in 1952, Adamski reported that he had met and conversed with a visitor from Venus in a California desert, using a combination of hand gestures and mental telepathy.

His story would only get stranger from there.

A star gazer is born

Adamski chronicled his alleged adventures in several books. The first, Flying Saucers Have Landed (1953), coauthored with Desmond Leslie, recounted his chat with the Venusian. Widely read at the time, it later gained a new generation of fans in the trippy 1960s.

Adamski’s 1955 sequel, Inside the Space Ships, described further meetings, not only with the Venusian but also with emissaries from Mars and Saturn.In Adamski’s telling, every planet in our solar system was populated with human-like inhabitants, as was the dark side of the earth’s moon.

In the 1955 book, Adamski claimed that his new friends took him aboard one of their scout ships, flew him to an immense mother ship hovering over the earth, gave him a ride around the moon and treated him to a colorful travelogue about life on Venus.

Along the way, he was also tutored by a space man he called “the master.” The master, who was said to be nearly 1,000 years old, shared the secrets of the universe with Adamski, only some of which he was allowed to divulge back on earth.

Preposterous as his stories seemed, Adamski became an international celebrity and lectured widely. Queen Juliana of the Netherlands raised a public stir after inviting him to her palace in 1959 to discuss extraterrestrial doings. Adamski supposedly claimed a secret 1963 meeting with the pope, as well.

Adamski soon had followers all over the planet. But not everybody was on board. Arthur C. Clarke, the author of 2001: A Space Odyssey, not only denounced Adamski’s work but characterized his believers as “nitwits.”

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Evansville-Area Man Once Had a Chilling Close Encounter With a UFO

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Article by Jon Webb                           December 27, 2019                               (courierpress.com)

• In June 1923, when Norman Massie was 10 years old, he was leading his family’s horses to the pasture at their farm in Mount Erie, Illinois (near Evansville, Indiana). “As I was closing the gate,” related Massie, “I looked back down the field and there was an object with lights all around it.” “… The machine was metallic and stood on three legs. The top was a dome with holes in it. The best way I could describe the top was it looked like melted glass.”

• When young Massie got within 50 feet of the thing, he noticed men milling around inside the ship, taking orders from a seated fellow they called ‘The Commander’. “I didn’t know what was going on until the end,” said Massie. “Then, one of the crew members told the Commander that the repairs had been made.” With that, the ship shot off the ground and zapped across the sky, disappearing forever. Massie estimates that the encounter couldn’t have lasted more than five minutes.

• Massie insisted that this UFO existed. He had seen it “with (his) own two eyes.” But Massie’s parents begged him not to talk about his UFO experience. ‘Keep the metallic ship — and the Commander — to yourself’, they told their son.

• While the US Air Force’s ‘Project Bluebook’ investigated 12,618 reported UFO sightings in the US during the Cold War between 1947 and 1969, and “solved” all but 700 of them, they made it clear that none of the sightings represented a threat to national security, and none of them had anything to do with aliens. So anyone claiming otherwise was labeled as “crazy”. This stigma has persisted until only recently.

• Massie remained silent until 1990 when he told his story to his son, a former colonel in the Air Force. The story didn’t surprise his son at all. Massie’s son told him that Air Force files were ‘full of pictures of UFOs’. Massie’s son accepted his father’s story as the truth.

• In 1998, Massie related his story to Len Wells, a writer for the Evansville Courier & Press. But Wells waited to publish a column about the sighting until after Massie died in 2004 at the age of 91. Wells knew that some people would accuse Massie of being crazy or a liar, or just some poor naïve man who had convinced himself that this ludicrous story from a childhood fantasy was real. But Wells says that Massie wasn’t that kind of guy. Massie worked in Wayne County schools as a teacher and basketball coach for almost 40 years. He also sold World Book Encyclopedias all over the Tri-State area. Massie’s son says that he heard Massie tell his UFO story many times, and “it was always the same. Never embellished from one time to the next.”

 

12,618.

That’s how many times the U.S. Air Force fielded sightings of unidentified flying objects between 1947 and 1969.

Back then, they were toiling through the infamous Project Blue Book — an effort to investigate the scores of UFO sightings that popped up all over America during the Cold War.

Military officials dismissed a huge chunk of them, sometimes conjuring ho-hum explanations such as the time-honored “weather balloon.” But by the end of the project, more than 700 reports of strange lights or shapes in the sky remained unexplained.

This month marks 50 years since the Air Force shuttered the project with a shrug. According to findings released on Dec. 18, 1969, the Air Force said none of the sightings represented a threat to national security. And, most importantly, none of them had anything to do with aliens.

That didn’t dissuade the true believers, of course — including the hundreds in the Evansville area who reported sightings of their own.

And it certainly didn’t change the mind of Norman Massie.

The long-time Southern Illinois teacher and basketball coach lived through a chilling close encounter decades before Project Blue Book was even a twinkle in the government’s eye.

The machine

Massie worked in Wayne County schools for almost 40 years.

He sold World Book Encyclopedias on the side, schlepping hardbound volumes to knowledge-hungry residents all over the Tri-State.

But if you punch his name into Google today, none of that will come up. Instead, he’s become infamous for something he saw when he was only 10 years old.

According to an old Courier & Press column by Len Wells that’s been pirated and shot into the weirdest corners of the Internet, Massie grew up in the tiny town of Mount Erie, Illinois, about 60 miles west of Oakland City.

And one morning in June 1923, he led the family horses into the pasture.

“As I was closing the gate, I looked back down the field and there was an object with lights all around it,” Massie told Wells in 1998.

“… The machine was metallic and stood on three legs,” he said. “The top was a dome with holes in it. The best way I could describe the top was it looked like melted glass.”

When he got within 50 feet of the thing, he realized he wasn’t alone. Men milled around inside the ship, taking orders from a seated fellow they called “The Commander.”

“I didn’t know what was going on until the end,” he told Wells. “Then, one of the crew members told the commander that the repairs had been made.”
With that, the ship shot off the ground and zapped across the sky, disappearing forever. Massie told Wells the encounter couldn’t have lasted more than five minutes — but it haunted him for the rest of his life.

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