First Contact or First Murder?

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Article by Guy P. Harrison                     July 31, 2019                     (psychologytoday.com)

• A common practice in the scientific community is studying a biological creature by killing and dissecting it as a “voucher specimen”. Labs and museums around the world contain millions of them. A dissection may reveal many things that simple observation or a good photograph cannot.

• But this raises a moral question about possibly finding extraterrestrial life forms on Mars or perhaps on one of Saturn’s moons. What do we do? Will Earth scientists be content to observe, take a few photographs, maybe a gentle swab of its exterior? Or will First Contact become First Murder?

• If killing a newly discovered extraterrestrial life form in the name of research is wrong, then why is the routine carnage here on Earth for the same reason okay? Is a bat or a gulper eel somehow less valuable to the universe or less worthy of survival than a microbe on Mars?

• This writer’s answer is that we should make case-by-case decisions according to what can be determined from observations. If the creature is rare or of a higher intelligence, then let it live. Killing an earthworm for study is not viewed as comparable to killing a dolphin or bonobo because of the cognitive contrast. This may not be so easy to determine on other worlds, however. The new life form might think in ways that are outside of our experience and imagination.

• What if there were a life form on Enceladus, Ganymede, or Europa that operates with a subtle but highly sophisticated hive intelligence? In isolation, it might appear simple and therefore ethically killable to researchers. But if there were more going on than we could understand, collecting the extraterrestrial voucher specimen could be our first galactic felony.

• A case can be made for leaving all extraterrestrial life alive and unharmed, regardless of intelligence. But just taking a step on another world could destroy tiny unseen creatures beneath the boot. The mere presence of a human or robot could be apocalyptic to life on another world. But isn’t this how nature operates? Here on Earth, one life form can scarcely do anything without causing stress or death to another. Our planet is a constant horror show of sorts – parasitizing, injuring, enslaving, depriving, stomping, breathing in, or swallowing other lifeforms. Can we realistically conduct ourselves differently on other worlds than we are accustomed to here on our home planet?

• On the other hand, what if we meet a higher intelligence extraterrestrial civilization that finds itself struggling with the moral implications of killing us for further study?

[Editor’s Note]   This writer, Guy P. Harrison, is the author of: Think: Why You Should Question Everything. With a book so entitled, it is a wonder why Harrison is not among the truth seekers in the UFO community. But he is like the vast majority of the unconscious public who don’t even consider the possibility that extraterrestrial beings are already here. Harrison, like most of the world, thinks strictly in third-density terms. Find a biological form, kill it, study it. Find another biological form, kill it, study it…. and so it goes – the way of the Dodo bird.

According to former Air Force lab technician, Emery Smith, Emery worked in an extensive laboratory in a special base underneath Kirtland Air Force base near Albuquerque New Mexico, where he dissected and analyzed thousands of specimens, body parts, and entire bodies of extraterrestrial beings that were killed or otherwise discovered by the secret space program.  So this is already going on, and of course, the medical establishment has no qualms about killing and dissecting aliens of all kinds.

If Mr. Harrison only knew that the human race itself is a long-running genetic experiment by technologically advanced extraterrestrial groups, which explains the discovery of so many so-called “extinct” human species that came before Cro-Magnon. These extraterrestrials have genetically programmed the human species for violence, war and aggression in the name of power, wealth and religion. We unnecessarily suffer disease, injury, and aging. We are actively mind-controlled through our electronic media, chemtrail and fast food additives. And we are slaves to an artificial economic system designed to oppress and suppress the masses, and to create fear and anxiety, which is the negative ET’s agenda.

Mr. Harrison struggles to find the borderline of morality between the extraterrestrial life forms that should be spared and those that can be sacrificed. What a shock it will be to these purveyors of mainstream history, science and psychology when they realize that all of this time it has been the human beings on this planet that have been the lab specimens, routinely compromised and killed in the name of science.

 

It is an odd sequence of events common to many branches of scientific study: A student falls in love with the beauty, mystery, and complexity of a plant, animal, or microbial species. Then the student learns as much about it as possible, searches for it in the wild, finds it—and promptly kills it. The preferred term for these routine sacrifices is “voucher specimen.” Labs and museums around the world contain millions of them.

               Guy P. Harrison

There is some controversy over this process of killing and collecting. But it is not difficult to see both the honorable motivations behind it and the significant payoff. Scientists are driven to learn, and dead specimens are effective teachers. A dissection may reveal many things that simple observation or a good photograph cannot. How much less would we know today about the life we share this world with if researchers had not killed and studied so much wildlife over the centuries? How many species have been protected—saved from extinction, perhaps—because of knowledge gained from voucher specimens?

But this is still killing. And it raises a moral question about space exploration that we should be thinking about. Should we encounter an extraterrestrial life form on Mars or perhaps on one of Saturn’s moons, what do we do? Will the astronauts, astrobiologists, and robot controllers of Earth be content to observe, take a few photographs, maybe grab a gentle swab of its exterior? Or will First Contact become First Murder?

This is a tough question because the idea of finally discovering life beyond the Earth and then ending that life probably feels wrong to many people. But if killing newly discovered extraterrestrial life in the name of research is wrong, then why is the routine carnage here on Earth for the same reason okay? Is a bat or a gulper eel somehow less valuable to the universe or less worthy of survival than a microbe on Mars?

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Biologist Claims ‘Mars Still Has Life’ But ‘It’s Hiding’

by Tom Fish                 May 10, 2019                 (express.co.uk)

• Four billion years ago, the Martian surface featured habitable rivers, lakes and even a deep ocean. Some astrobiologists believe that ancient Mars was a more conducive cradle for life than early Earth. Mars lost its habitability when the Red Planet lost its global magnetic field and the Sun’s radiation stripped away the once-thick Martian atmosphere. This process transformed Mars into the cold, dry world of today.

• Michael Finney, co-founder of The Genome Partnership said, ”If Mars had life 4 billion years ago, Mars still has life.” “Nothing has happened on Mars that would’ve wiped out life.” “So, if there were life on Mars, it may have moved around, it may have gone into hiding a bit, but it is probably still there.” One of the most promising hiding places for finding alien life is beneath the Martian surface.

• Although there is a lack of running water on the Martian surface, there is likely lots of water in buried aquifers. The Mars Express orbiter data suggests that a big lake lies beneath the Mars’ south pole. The existence of methane on Mars that may have been produced by organisms indicates life on the planet in the past.

[Editor’s Note]    Yes, in its past Mars had all of the features needed for a thriving planet, e.g.: an atmosphere, running surface water, vegetation. In fact, it was home to an intelligent and sophisticated civilization. After its catastrophe 500 million years ago, the indigenous intelligent beings – including humans and reptoid beings – went underground where remnants of these past cultures are still living. Now there appears to be a contest between the Draco/German/Corporate SSP and an insectoid race of beings, each contending for control over the planet.

 

When looking for locations where alien life could potentially live, few places fire the imagination like Earth’s nearest neighbour – Mars. Humans have for centuries has looked to the heavens and wondered whether Mars is a home for extraterrestrials. And although NASA research has yet to find evidence of alien life on Mars, it does not necessarily mean the Red Planet is dead, a NASA scientist has announced.

Four billion years ago, the Martian surface was a wetter world, featuring habitable rivers, lakes and even a deep ocean.
“If Mars had life 4 billion years ago, Mars still has life,” Dr Michael Finney

And some astrobiologists believe an ancient Mars was a more conducive cradle for life than early Earth.

While a growing scientific consensus suspect life on Earth may have been sowed by Martian asteroids slamming into our planet.

However, Mars lost its habitability when the Red Planet lost its global magnetic field.

This in turn allowed deadly [?] emanating from the Sun to strip away the once-thick Martian atmosphere.

NASA’s MAVEN orbiter has showed how this process transformed Mars into the cold, dry world we recognise today.
However this planetary evolution does not necessarily mean the Red Planet is now a dead planet.

Michael Finney, co-founder of The Genome Partnership said: ”If Mars had life 4 billion years ago, Mars still has life.
“Nothing has happened on Mars that would’ve wiped out life.

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Alien Life Search Update: NASA Could Soon Locate Extraterrestrials With New Telescope

by Johnny Vatican                       May 1, 2019                       (medicaldaily.com)

• The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), which will go online in 2021 replacing the Hubble Telescope, will be the most sophisticated space telescope ever made. The JWST will be able to observe high redshift objects that are too old and too distant for the Hubble and other earlier instruments to observe. It promises to see deeper into time, and with much greater clarity, than any space-based or terrestrial optical telescope on Earth.

• One of the JWST’s major goals is observing some of the most distant events and objects in the universe such as the formation of the first galaxies, the formation of stars and planets, and direct imaging of exoplanets and novas. The JWST will be able to see 0.3 billion years after the Big Bang to when visible light itself was beginning to form. It will accurately measure the content of water, carbon dioxide and other components in the atmosphere of an exoplanet hundreds of light years away and will tell scientists more about the size and distance of these exoplanets are from their host suns. By measuring the chemical make-up of a planet, scientists will be able to see if it can host life.

• “Even if we never find other life in our Solar System, we might still detect it on any one of thousands of known exoplanets,” Cathal O’Connor, researcher and center manager at the University of Melbourne, said. “The ancient question ‘Are we alone?’ has graduated from being a philosophical musing to a testable hypothesis. We should be prepared for an answer.”

 

When the astonishing James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) sees first light in 2021, the world of science as we know it will never be the same again.

The most sophisticated space telescope ever made promises to see deeper into time, and with much greater clarity, than any space-based or terrestrial optical telescope on Earth. Some of the more starry-eyed fantasize JWST might even glimpse alien spacecraft hovering over their home planet.
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The replacement for the venerable Hubble Telescope will be able to see 0.3 billion years after the Big Bang to when visible light itself was beginning to form. It will accurately measure the content of water, carbon dioxide and other components in the atmosphere of an exoplanet hundreds of light years away and will tell scientists more about the size and distance of these exoplanets are from their host suns.

By measuring the chemical make-up of a planet, scientists will be able to see if it can host life.

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