Aliens Smell Like a Fart

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Article By Eric Spitznagel                           November 25, 2019                        (popularmechanics.com)

• NASA’s roving Martian science lab, Curiosity, has detected dimethyl sulfide, methanethiol, and trace amounts of oxygen on Mars, along with the compounds we already know about, like nitrogen, hydrogen, and carbon dioxide. This is the same chemical composition as flatulence.

• Clara Sousa-Silva, a molecular astrophysics postdoctoral associate at MIT, agrees. “Most of my work in astrobiology looks at anaerobic environments, which have a lot in common with the environments that produce farts. So, yes, aliens are reasonably likely to smell like farts.”

• There are other examples of planets and other celestial bodies with theoretically pungent life forms. For instance, Saturn’s icy moon Titan holds lakes of liquid methane. Using data from the Cassini space probe, NASA was able to replicate the mixture of nitrogen, methane, and benzene found on Titan to learn that Titan smells like farts and gasoline.

• Sousa-Silva points out that the molecule phosphine could be the key to detecting life on other planets. Phospine needs to be manufactured by a process associated with biological life on the earth, because it won’t exist naturally in a mild climate. So if phospine is detected on a habitable planet, there is likely to be life there.

• Carrie Paterson, an LA-based artist and expert in the “cosmology of the senses” points out that there are olfactory receptors not only in our nose but in our skin and internal organs. She thinks there is a “distinct possibility that we might be able to communicate with aliens through our sense of smell”. “A ‘moldy’ smell is not just a smell”, Paterson says, “it’s a sensation our bodies have in the presence of fungus. Fresh’ isn’t just about air without pollution, but rather, how a clean environment is sensed by our skin.” What might smell ‘good’ or ‘bad’ to an alien would depend on their particular ‘corporeal composition’.

• In 1996 in Varginha, Brazil, sisters Liliane and Valquíria encountered a creature they thought might be the devil. When their mother went to investigate, she noticed a putrid odor of ammonia hanging in the air. Ammonia is a sulphurous gas, similar to a fart. And it is the predominant odor on the planet Uranus.

• Michael Menkin, a former technical writer for NASA, has heard firsthand from extraterrestrial abductees that aliens “really smell.” Menkin says that “their alien-human hybrids (also) stink because they never bathe.” But as much as an alien’s odor may offend us, our human scent, and the scents we find appealing, might be just as offensive to them. “Right now I have an abductee who stops aliens by spraying Lysol all over her house,” said Menkin. “So Lysol works as well as perfumes.”

[Editor’s Note]   I recall Stewart Swerdlow saying that reptilians smelled horrible, like ammonia and sulfur. And it felt good to the reptilians to spray Lysol disinfectant spray on their body’s skin. Maybe that helped a little with the smell?

But something doesn’t ring true here. NASA is said to have detected dimethyl sulfide and methanethiol on Mars, supporting the flatulent atmosphere theory. But they found only “trace amounts of oxygen on Mars”. Those who claim to have been on Mars have all said that that there is enough oxygen in the atmosphere for light breathing without an oxygen tank.  I have never heard anyone who has been on Mars say that the air smelled like farts.

Is NASA feeding universities such as MIT data to make people think that the Mars atmosphere is not only uninhabitable but disgusting, to discourage anyone from wanting to go there?

 

Sometimes it takes a child to point out the important questions.

My 8-year-old is a burgeoning amateur scientist, so he keeps up with the latest science news a little more closely than I do. He learned recently that Curiosity, NASA’s roving Martian science lab, has been detecting some rather interesting organic and chemical molecules on the red planet, some of which could be clues of life. So far it’s discovered dimethyl sulfide, methanethiol, and most surprisingly, trace amounts of oxygen.

                       Clara Sousa-Silva

Along with the compounds we already know about, like nitrogen, hydrogen, and carbon dioxide, Mars has the same chemical composition of flatulence. Which led my son to one inescapable conclusion: If aliens exist, they probably smell like farts.

I don’t know enough about farts, Mars, or aliens to refute him, so I reached out to somebody who does: Clara Sousa-Silva, a molecular astrophysics postdoctoral associate at MIT.

“Your son is absolutely correct in his inference,” she told me. “Most of my work in astrobiology looks at anaerobic environments, which have a lot in common with the environments that produce farts. So, yes, aliens are reasonably likely to smell like farts.”

And at least according to Sousa-Silva, the answer to that question is: not especially pleasant. Even if Martians denied it, they most definitely supplied it.

But we don’t need to single out Mars. There are other examples of planets and other celestial bodies with theoretically pungent life forms.

Saturn’s icy moon Titan has gotten a lot of attention of late, thanks to data collected from NASA’s Cassini spacecraft over a 14-year mission. Its lakes of liquid methane, which may be filled with alien crystals, have raised questions about the “possibility of life,” as NASA planetary geologist Rosaly Lopes phrased it to Reuters last week.

A few years back, some of the gases and hydrocarbons collected by Cassini were used to create a recipe that replicated the “aromatic flavors” of Titan. Composed mostly of nitrogen, methane, and benzene (and a few other aromatics), NASA researchers were able to create in the lab what could be dubbed Eau de Titan, the cologne of choice for Titan aliens (should they exist).

What they discovered: Titan smells like farts and gasoline.

Does that mean Titan aliens could conceivably share the hearty stench of a garage filled with flatulent auto mechanics? Possibly … but probably not, says Sara Seager, an astrophysicist and planetary scientist at MIT.

“If the alien life was producing hydrocarbons, that life would smell like gasoline,” she says. “Right now it sounds like the Titan atmosphere at large smells like gasoline, independent of life.”

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First Contact or First Murder?

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Article by Guy P. Harrison                     July 31, 2019                     (psychologytoday.com)

• A common practice in the scientific community is studying a biological creature by killing and dissecting it as a “voucher specimen”. Labs and museums around the world contain millions of them. A dissection may reveal many things that simple observation or a good photograph cannot.

• But this raises a moral question about possibly finding extraterrestrial life forms on Mars or perhaps on one of Saturn’s moons. What do we do? Will Earth scientists be content to observe, take a few photographs, maybe a gentle swab of its exterior? Or will First Contact become First Murder?

• If killing a newly discovered extraterrestrial life form in the name of research is wrong, then why is the routine carnage here on Earth for the same reason okay? Is a bat or a gulper eel somehow less valuable to the universe or less worthy of survival than a microbe on Mars?

• This writer’s answer is that we should make case-by-case decisions according to what can be determined from observations. If the creature is rare or of a higher intelligence, then let it live. Killing an earthworm for study is not viewed as comparable to killing a dolphin or bonobo because of the cognitive contrast. This may not be so easy to determine on other worlds, however. The new life form might think in ways that are outside of our experience and imagination.

• What if there were a life form on Enceladus, Ganymede, or Europa that operates with a subtle but highly sophisticated hive intelligence? In isolation, it might appear simple and therefore ethically killable to researchers. But if there were more going on than we could understand, collecting the extraterrestrial voucher specimen could be our first galactic felony.

• A case can be made for leaving all extraterrestrial life alive and unharmed, regardless of intelligence. But just taking a step on another world could destroy tiny unseen creatures beneath the boot. The mere presence of a human or robot could be apocalyptic to life on another world. But isn’t this how nature operates? Here on Earth, one life form can scarcely do anything without causing stress or death to another. Our planet is a constant horror show of sorts – parasitizing, injuring, enslaving, depriving, stomping, breathing in, or swallowing other lifeforms. Can we realistically conduct ourselves differently on other worlds than we are accustomed to here on our home planet?

• On the other hand, what if we meet a higher intelligence extraterrestrial civilization that finds itself struggling with the moral implications of killing us for further study?

[Editor’s Note]   This writer, Guy P. Harrison, is the author of: Think: Why You Should Question Everything. With a book so entitled, it is a wonder why Harrison is not among the truth seekers in the UFO community. But he is like the vast majority of the unconscious public who don’t even consider the possibility that extraterrestrial beings are already here. Harrison, like most of the world, thinks strictly in third-density terms. Find a biological form, kill it, study it. Find another biological form, kill it, study it…. and so it goes – the way of the Dodo bird.

According to former Air Force lab technician, Emery Smith, Emery worked in an extensive laboratory in a special base underneath Kirtland Air Force base near Albuquerque New Mexico, where he dissected and analyzed thousands of specimens, body parts, and entire bodies of extraterrestrial beings that were killed or otherwise discovered by the secret space program.  So this is already going on, and of course, the medical establishment has no qualms about killing and dissecting aliens of all kinds.

If Mr. Harrison only knew that the human race itself is a long-running genetic experiment by technologically advanced extraterrestrial groups, which explains the discovery of so many so-called “extinct” human species that came before Cro-Magnon. These extraterrestrials have genetically programmed the human species for violence, war and aggression in the name of power, wealth and religion. We unnecessarily suffer disease, injury, and aging. We are actively mind-controlled through our electronic media, chemtrail and fast food additives. And we are slaves to an artificial economic system designed to oppress and suppress the masses, and to create fear and anxiety, which is the negative ET’s agenda.

Mr. Harrison struggles to find the borderline of morality between the extraterrestrial life forms that should be spared and those that can be sacrificed. What a shock it will be to these purveyors of mainstream history, science and psychology when they realize that all of this time it has been the human beings on this planet that have been the lab specimens, routinely compromised and killed in the name of science.

 

It is an odd sequence of events common to many branches of scientific study: A student falls in love with the beauty, mystery, and complexity of a plant, animal, or microbial species. Then the student learns as much about it as possible, searches for it in the wild, finds it—and promptly kills it. The preferred term for these routine sacrifices is “voucher specimen.” Labs and museums around the world contain millions of them.

               Guy P. Harrison

There is some controversy over this process of killing and collecting. But it is not difficult to see both the honorable motivations behind it and the significant payoff. Scientists are driven to learn, and dead specimens are effective teachers. A dissection may reveal many things that simple observation or a good photograph cannot. How much less would we know today about the life we share this world with if researchers had not killed and studied so much wildlife over the centuries? How many species have been protected—saved from extinction, perhaps—because of knowledge gained from voucher specimens?

But this is still killing. And it raises a moral question about space exploration that we should be thinking about. Should we encounter an extraterrestrial life form on Mars or perhaps on one of Saturn’s moons, what do we do? Will the astronauts, astrobiologists, and robot controllers of Earth be content to observe, take a few photographs, maybe grab a gentle swab of its exterior? Or will First Contact become First Murder?

This is a tough question because the idea of finally discovering life beyond the Earth and then ending that life probably feels wrong to many people. But if killing newly discovered extraterrestrial life in the name of research is wrong, then why is the routine carnage here on Earth for the same reason okay? Is a bat or a gulper eel somehow less valuable to the universe or less worthy of survival than a microbe on Mars?

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Biologist Claims ‘Mars Still Has Life’ But ‘It’s Hiding’

by Tom Fish                 May 10, 2019                 (express.co.uk)

• Four billion years ago, the Martian surface featured habitable rivers, lakes and even a deep ocean. Some astrobiologists believe that ancient Mars was a more conducive cradle for life than early Earth. Mars lost its habitability when the Red Planet lost its global magnetic field and the Sun’s radiation stripped away the once-thick Martian atmosphere. This process transformed Mars into the cold, dry world of today.

• Michael Finney, co-founder of The Genome Partnership said, ”If Mars had life 4 billion years ago, Mars still has life.” “Nothing has happened on Mars that would’ve wiped out life.” “So, if there were life on Mars, it may have moved around, it may have gone into hiding a bit, but it is probably still there.” One of the most promising hiding places for finding alien life is beneath the Martian surface.

• Although there is a lack of running water on the Martian surface, there is likely lots of water in buried aquifers. The Mars Express orbiter data suggests that a big lake lies beneath the Mars’ south pole. The existence of methane on Mars that may have been produced by organisms indicates life on the planet in the past.

[Editor’s Note]    Yes, in its past Mars had all of the features needed for a thriving planet, e.g.: an atmosphere, running surface water, vegetation. In fact, it was home to an intelligent and sophisticated civilization. After its catastrophe 500 million years ago, the indigenous intelligent beings – including humans and reptoid beings – went underground where remnants of these past cultures are still living. Now there appears to be a contest between the Draco/German/Corporate SSP and an insectoid race of beings, each contending for control over the planet.

 

When looking for locations where alien life could potentially live, few places fire the imagination like Earth’s nearest neighbour – Mars. Humans have for centuries has looked to the heavens and wondered whether Mars is a home for extraterrestrials. And although NASA research has yet to find evidence of alien life on Mars, it does not necessarily mean the Red Planet is dead, a NASA scientist has announced.

Four billion years ago, the Martian surface was a wetter world, featuring habitable rivers, lakes and even a deep ocean.
“If Mars had life 4 billion years ago, Mars still has life,” Dr Michael Finney

And some astrobiologists believe an ancient Mars was a more conducive cradle for life than early Earth.

While a growing scientific consensus suspect life on Earth may have been sowed by Martian asteroids slamming into our planet.

However, Mars lost its habitability when the Red Planet lost its global magnetic field.

This in turn allowed deadly [?] emanating from the Sun to strip away the once-thick Martian atmosphere.

NASA’s MAVEN orbiter has showed how this process transformed Mars into the cold, dry world we recognise today.
However this planetary evolution does not necessarily mean the Red Planet is now a dead planet.

Michael Finney, co-founder of The Genome Partnership said: ”If Mars had life 4 billion years ago, Mars still has life.
“Nothing has happened on Mars that would’ve wiped out life.

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