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The Letter the Navy Sent a Congressman Who Was Demanding Answers About UFOs

 

Article by Joseph Trevithick                             March 6, 2020                              (thedrive.com)

• Last year, Congressman Mark Walker, (R-NC) and a member of the House Committee on Homeland Security (pictured above), wrote a letter to the US Navy demanding answers to the military’s UFO sightings. On July 31, 2019, then-Under Secretary of the Navy Thomas Modly wrote a responsive letter to the Congressman, who deemed it “frustratingly insufficient”. Politico reported on the response in September 2019, but didn’t publish the letter itself. On March 5, 2020, in response to a Freedom of Information Act request, The War Zone obtained a complete, unredacted copy of the responsive letter.

• In his July 31 responsive letter, Moldy wrote, “There have been a number of reports of unauthorized and/or unidentified aircraft entering various military-controlled training ranges and designated air space in recent years. …The Department of the Navy (DON) takes these reports very seriously and continues to log sightings and fully investigate the accounts.”

• Congressman Walker’s original letter clearly asked the Navy for information about the highly publicized incidents that fighter pilots had reported, which involved flying craft capable of extreme levels of speed and maneuverability (ie: the “Tic Tac” UFO). But Modly’s letter makes no mention of the high-profile UFO/UAP incidents involving US Navy pilots and personnel dating back to at least 2004. It also does not mention the DoD/DIA’s Advanced Aerospace Threat and Identification Program or its predecessor program.

• Instead, the Navy’s response focused on drones buzzing military bases. “The wide proliferation and availability of inexpensive unmanned aerial systems (UAS) has increasingly made airspace de-confliction an issue for our aviators.” Moldy’s letter then addresses what the Navy is doing about these drones. “Naval aircrews have been provided reporting guidance to determine the frequency and location of UAS operating in training areas. …The Department of the Navy continues to dedicate resources to the tracking and investigation of reports that could affect the safety of our aircrews.”

• Modly’s letter ends by saying that the Navy will continue to work with the House of Representatives via the House Armed Services Committee, of which Walker is not a member. It does not address the release of data or physical evidence relating to reported UAP sightings, which the letter specifically sought.

• Walker had sent his letter because the reported UAP incidents represented a threat to Homeland Security, including commercial and civilian aircraft as well as military ones flying in US Airspace. With these mysterious UAPs roaming the skies, Navy pilots had expressed concern for their safety. The responsive letter from the Under Secretary did little to alleviate those concerns.

• In a statement, Walker said: “While I am encouraged the Under Secretary of the Navy confirmed that UAP encounters are fully investigated, there is frustration with the lack of answers to specific questions about the threat that superior aircraft flying in United States airspace may pose. …If the Navy believes that China or Russia possesses advanced aerospace technologies that represent a national security vulnerability, the American people have the right to know what their government is doing about it.”

• It’s unclear if Walker, or any other members of Congress, have followed up or otherwise succeeded in obtaining additional information on this issue. Some Senators and the President have received classified briefings on the UAP sightings. But in September 2019, the Navy stated that it had not received any further requests from legislators on this topic.

• Whatever the case, the public safety and national security concerns surrounding UAP sightings are still very much in the public consciousnesses.

 

Last year, Congressman Mark Walker, a Republican from North Carolina and a member of the House Committee on Homeland Security, wrote a letter to the U.S. Navy demanding answers regarding sightings of what are commonly referred to as unidentified flying objects, or UFOs. Now, The War Zone has obtained a complete copy of the service’s response to these questions about how it is recording and assessing incidents involving what it calls unidentified aerial phenomena, or UAP, which the lawmaker has already said he felt was frustratingly insufficient.

On Mar. 5, 2020, the Navy released an unredacted copy of the letter, which then-Undersecretary of the Navy Thomas Modly wrote on July 31, 2019, in response to a Freedom of Information Act request. Politico was first to report on this letter, after obtaining a copy, in September 2019, but did not publish or otherwise reproduce it in full.

Walker had sent his initial letter, addressed to then-Secretary of the Navy Richard Spencer, on July 16, 2019, and had made a copy publicly available on July 29, which the War Zone reported on at the time. It is also worth noting that Modly has been Acting Secretary of the Navy since Spencer resigned in November 2019.

“There have been a number of reports of unauthorized and/or unidentified aircraft entering various military-controlled training ranges and designated air space in recent years,” Modly wrote in this July 31 response. “The Department of the Navy (DON) takes these reports very seriously and continues to log sightings and fully investigate the accounts.”

Modly’s letter makes no mention of a number of high profile UAP incidents involving Navy F/A-18C/D Hornet and F/A-18E/F Super Hornet fighter jets, dating back to at least 2004. You can read more about these particular events in detail in these past War Zone stories.

It also does not discuss any Navy connection to the Advanced Aerospace Threat and Identification Program (AATIP), or its predecessor, the Advanced Aerospace Weapon System Applications (AAWSA) program, which existed for various periods of time within the Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) and the Office of the Secretary of Defense. You can find out more about those programs in these previous War Zone pieces.

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The Navy Has Admitted That UFOs Exist – Will USOs Be Next?

Listen to “E130 The Navy Has Admitted That UFOs Exist – Will USOs Be Next?” on Spreaker.

Article by Alex Hollings                       October 9, 2019                     (sofrep.com)

• In September, the US Navy confirmed that while the Navy videos of Unidentified Aerial Phenomena (or UFOs) were not meant for release to the public, they were authentic. John Greenewald, Jr of ‘The Black Vault’ website was the man that got the Navy to discuss the videos, leading to the video confirmation. The Navy, however, didn’t know what these phenomenon were.

• Similarly, there is another unusual phenomenon that gets far less attention in the press: ‘Unidentified Submerged Objects’. A ‘USO’ is a catch-all term used to describe anything seen operating beneath the surface of water that defies explanation. Legends of USOs have permeated the maritime community for centuries. Many UFO witness, including military aviators, have suggested that UFOs operate just as well underwater as they do in the sky.

• Christopher Columbus reported seeing a USO sighting during his 1492 voyage to the New World. According to Columbus’ log, he spotted “a small wax candle that rose and lifted up, which too few seemed to be an indication of land.” They soon determined that it wasn’t a light source from land, but had instead come from the sea.
• In 1967, witnesses in Shag Harbor, Nova Scotia Canada, reported a UFO crashing into the harbor’s waters. The Royal Canadian Mounted Police launched rescue efforts for a ‘downed aircraft’, which turned up nothing.

• Earlier this year, Tylor Rogoway of ‘The War Zone’ website interviewed veteran U.S. Navy submariners, some of whom were SONAR operators with first-hand experience spotting these USO anomalies. That story can be traced back to Marc D’Antonio who, during a ‘courtesy ride’ on a U.S. Navy fast attack submarine, watched as the sub’s sonar operator detected a “fast mover” moving at hundreds of knots under the water in close proximity. Such a scenario of a fast moving, unidentified underwater object spotted by Navy personnel and then disregarded, rings true with veteran American submariners. Said one former submariner, “We were instructed that nothing is ever ‘unknown.” “[So] we usually logged it as seismic or biologic.”

• Such underwater anomalies typically go ignored unless they represent a threat to the vessel or an obstacle to the crew. The ocean is full of man made ships and living creatures. So encountering ‘strange’ objects is just a part of business when you’re operating a fast attack sub. One infamous unexplained ocean phenomena was the “Bloop” – a massive underwater sound recorded in 1997. (see 3:37 minute video of the “Bloop” below) The Bloop sound was so loud that it was recorded simultaneously on underwater microphones located more than 3,000 miles apart.

• As a policy, the Navy doesn’t investigate strange sonar readings, so unusual underwater phenomenon largely go unreported so long as it doesn’t interfere with the mission. But sub-mariner accounts confirm that ‘weird stuff’ is normal in the dark depths of Earth’s oceans. But ‘weird’ doesn’t necessarily mean alien, it just means unexplained… for now.

 

Last month, the United States Navy confirmed formally that two high profile videos allegedly captured from the nose of an F/A-18 Super Hornet attempting an intercept on an Unidentified Aerial Phenomena were real and notably, weren’t meant for release to the public. The Navy did not suggest that the strange craft shown in the videos was alien in origin, but rather did acknowledge that they truly didn’t know what they were seeing that night in January of 2015.

“I truly thought the official word on these videos would be ‘drones’ or something similar; but explainable,” John Greenewald, Jr, who runs the popular website The Black Vault, told SOFREP at the time. Greenewald was the man that got the Navy to discuss the videos, leading to a landslide of headlines throughout the media in the weeks that followed.
“We have official documents that have surfaced through FOIA that state just that. However, for the Navy to contradict that, and say that this ‘phenomena’ represents something ‘unidentified’ – that’s pretty amazing to me and proves yet again why we can’t lock ourselves into any one way of thinking or assume anything.”

Reports of unusual lights in the sky date all the way back to the beginning of recorded history, but there’s another unusual phenomena that often seems to coincide with these strange sightings that gets far less attention in the press: USOs, or Unidentified Submerged Objects. Like UFOs (Unidentified Flying Objects), USO is a sort of catch-all term used to describe anything seen operating beneath the surface of a body of water that defies explanation. Legends of USOs have permeated the maritime community for centuries, and remain a common facet of discussion among UFO researchers to this day. In fact, many UFO witness statements, including those provided by military aviators, have suggested that the unusual crafts they’ve spotted flying in the sky seem to operate just as readily in the far denser medium of water — suggesting that these unusual objects can function beneath the surface of the ocean just as well as they can in the air.

3:37 minute video of “the Bloop” sounds from the Deep Pacific Ocean (‘AS N’ YouTube)

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FAIR USE NOTICE: This page contains copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. ExoNews.org distributes this material for the purpose of news reporting, educational research, comment and criticism, constituting Fair Use under 17 U.S.C § 107. Please contact the Editor at ExoNews with any copyright issue.

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