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Five Weirdest UFO Sightings Ever Reported

 

Article by Lindsey Evans                           November 20, 2019                          (oddee.com)

• The 1950’s and 1960’s were they heyday of UFO sightings, experiences and abductions. It could be exciting and terrifying at the same time. Here are five weird UFO sightings:

The Flatwoods Monster 1952 West Virginia – A group of local boys and a woman all witnessed a fireball falling from the sky near Braxton. A highly noxious odor overwhelmed them and they saw a 10-foot tall monster with glowing red eyes and a spade-shaped head floating toward them. Both journalists and scientists investigated the site, but released no formal reports. (see previous ExoArticle here)

Airmen Disappearance 1953 Lake Superior – A pair of unusual blips appeared on military radar traveling across the sky. Airmen First Lieutenant Felix Moncla and Second Lieutenant Robert L. Wilson were dispatched in their Scorpion jet to investigate. Ground radar watched the two blips come closer to each other as the military jet approached until they were one blip. The radar operators assumed that the Scorpion must have flown over or under it. But the Scorpion had disappeared, and the original phenomena continued on its original flight path. Search and rescue teams couldn’t find any trace of the men or the plane.

Levelland UFO Case 1957 Levelland, Texas – Over the course of a single night, police in Levelland fielded calls from 15 separate motorists describing similar incidents. In all of them, the individuals vehicle died as they approached a large, egg-shaped object in the road. The egg would take off, and power returned to their car. Some described thunderous noise and extreme heat.

Betty and Barney Hill Abduction 1961 New Hampshire – The couple observed a UFO descend from space and follow them down an isolated road. Unseen forces stopped their car and four foot tall humanoid creatures led them aboard the spaceship and subjected them to medical examinations. Their memories were wiped, but Betty recalled many of the details during a series of vivid dreams (and hypnosis) later on.

Snippy the Horse Mutilation 1967 Alamosa, Colorado – Agnes King found the body of Snippy in a field, the head and neck de-fleshed. She picked up a piece of metal from the ground next to the horse’s body with horse’s hair on the implement. It was hot enough to burn her. There was a rumor that the horse’s tracks ended 100 feet from where they found the body.

 

The middle of the last century, before we went to the moon and immediately after, were the real heyday of UFO sightings. There were unexplained phenomena in the world, plus nuclear testing, military testing and no information highway. On the one hand, it must have been exciting to think you were witnessing an unexplained alien event. On the other, truly terrifying to imagine that alone on a dark road, aliens could abduct you to outer space. It was a world before drones, blimps, and missile testing explain can every bizarre phenomenon and strange sighting.

The Flatwoods Monster. 1952. West Virginia. A group of local boys and a woman all witnessed a fireball falling from the sky near Braxton. A highly noxious odor overwhelmed them and they saw a 10-foot tall monster with glowing red eyes and a spade-shaped head coming floating on top of the air as it approached them. Both journalists and scientists investigated the site, but released no formal reports.

Airmen Disappearance. 1953. Lake Superior. The airbase scrambled First Lieutenant Felix Moncla and Second Lieutenant Robert L. Wilson in their Scorpion jet to investigate unusual radar sightings. The phenomena appeared as two blips, that joined to form one blip the closer the airmen got in their jet. Ground control assumed that Moncla flew over or under the other aircraft and would circle around, but the Scorpion had disappeared, and the original phenomena continued on its original flight path. Search and rescue dispatched, but couldn’t find any trace of the men or the plane.

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In 1952, the Flatwoods Monster Terrified 6 Kids, a Mom, and a Dog

by Roy Wenzl                  July 20, 2018                  (history.com)

• At dusk on Sept. 12, 1952, brothers Ed, 13, and Freddie May, 12, had been playing in their schoolyard with their 10-year-old friend Tommy Hyer when they saw a pulsing red light streak across the sky and crash on a nearby farm. The three boys and the Mays boys’ mother, went to check out where the light had landed. A few other boys and a dog showed up too. According to the local newspaper, “Seven Braxton County residents on Saturday reported seeing a 10-foot Frankenstein-like monster (see illustration above) in the hills above Flatwoods,” a central West Virginian mountain town of less than 300 people.

• “A National Guard member, [17-year-old] Gene Lemon, was leading the group when he saw what appeared to be a pair of bright eyes in a tree,” stated a local newspaper account. Lemon screamed and fell backward “when he saw a 10-foot monster with a blood-red body and a green face that seemed to glow.” The story got picked up by national radio and big papers all over the country. Mrs. May and Gene Lemon ended up going to New York to talk to CBS television news.

• Local newspaper publisher A. Lee Stewart said, “Those people were the most scared people I’ve ever seen.” State police laughed off the reports as hysteria,” It was the era of Cold War anxieties. LIFE magazine had recently published a story about flying saucers. The Korean War was raging and Sen. Joseph McCarthy of Minnesota had been stoking fear of communism in every corner of the nation.

• People across the nation were “seduced by the story,” said behavioral psychologist Clay Routledge who has studied brain science, UFO beliefs and culture. “There’s the hope that we are not just insignificant organisms walking around aimlessly on a rock floating in space,” says Routledge, “There’s the hope that we’re part of something bigger.”

• The U.S. Air Force sent investigators. They concluded that a meteor had streaked across the eastern sky. And that the ‘monster’ was likely an owl. But that didn’t stop the townspeople from promoting the incident with merchandise, a museum, and a highway sign that reads, “Home of the Green Monster.”

• Freddie and Ed May are in their late 70s now, and still stand by their story. “As far as for myself,” Freddie says, “It doesn’t matter to me whether people believe, or don’t believe.”

 

The Flatwoods Monster has not hissed at boys in the little village of Flatwoods, West Virginia, since Sept. 12, 1952.

People grin about it now—and take Monster souvenir money, from hundreds of Monster tourists every week. But it scared people plenty back then, including the eyewitnesses: six boys aged 10 to 17, a dog and a Mom.

“One of the boys peed his pants,” said John Gibson, a high-school freshman at the time, who knew them all. “Their dog (Rickie) ran with his tail between his legs.”

The encounter made the local and national news, scaring a wider swath of people.

Then it prompted a U.S. Air Force UFO inquiry, part of a project called Project Blue Book that dispatched a handful of investigators around the country to look into such claims.

It also became a local legend, a Southern spook story that defined the tiny village of less than 300 people for more than six decades. To this day, tourists come out of their way to Flatwoods—secluded in the low, timbered Appalachian hills of central West Virginia—to visit its monster museum and buy Green Monster tchotchkes and T-shirts.

What they witnessed

It was dusk when they saw it. The May brothers Ed, 13, and Freddie, 12, had been playing in their schoolyard with their 10-year-old friend Tommy Hyer. After noticing a pulsing red light streak across the sky and crash on a nearby farm, the three youngsters ran to grab the Mays boys’ mother, then high-tailed it up that hill to check out where the light had landed. A few other boys, one with a dog, showed up too.

They ran back down—in sheer and credible terror.

“Seven Braxton County residents on Saturday reported seeing a 10-foot Frankenstein-like monster in the hills above Flatwoods,” a local newspaper reported afterward. “A National Guard member, [17-year-old] Gene Lemon, was leading the group when he saw what appeared to be a pair of bright eyes in a tree.”

Lemon screamed and fell backward, the news account said, “when he saw a 10-foot monster with a blood-red body and a green face that seemed to glow.” It may have had claws for hands. It was hard to tell because of the dense mist.

The story made the local news, then got picked up by national radio and big papers all over the country, said Andrew Smith, who runs the Flatwoods Monster Museum and the Braxton County Convention Visitors Bureau. “Mrs. May and the National Guard kid ended up going to New York to talk to CBS,” Gibson said.

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FAIR USE NOTICE: This page contains copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. ExoNews.org distributes this material for the purpose of news reporting, educational research, comment and criticism, constituting Fair Use under 17 U.S.C § 107. Please contact the Editor at ExoNews with any copyright issue.

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