Tag: China

China Quietly Launches ‘Reusable Experimental Spacecraft’

Article by Eric Mack                                   September 4, 2020                                    (cnet.com)

• On September 4th, with little fanfare China’s state-run Xinhua media outlet announced the launch of a “reusable experimental spacecraft” from the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in northwest China. Space industry watchers believe it to be some sort of unmanned space plane similar to the X-37B operated by the US Air Force and Space Force, that the Chinese have been developing since 2017.

• The statement reads: “After a period of in-orbit operation, the spacecraft will return to the scheduled landing site in China. It will test reusable technologies during its flight, providing technological support for the peaceful use of space.”

• The mission was conducted under a veil of secrecy with no official launch photos, and not even the time of launch made public. Jonathan McDowell with the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics speculated that China’s secrecy “leads one to think this is not only a space plane, it’s a military space plane”.

[Editor’s Note]   While the Chinese test flight lasted two days, the Americans have kept its umnanned X-37B aloft in space for more than two years. (see previous ExoArticle on the X-37B craft)

To be fair, the Air Force is just as secretive about its X-37B craft. But the unmanned Chinese craft, called ‘Chongfu Shiyong Shiyan Hangtian Qi’ (translation: ‘Repeat Use Test Space Craft’) returned safely two days after the September 4th launch. Interestingly, it appears that the Chinese craft released an object into space before returning back to the Earth. (see follow-up article “China’s reusable experimental spacecraft returns to Earth after two-day mystery mission”)

 

China says it has successfully launched a “reusable experimental spacecraft” under increased levels of secrecy. Space industry watchers believe it to be some sort of unmanned space plane similar to the X-37B operated by the US Air Force and Space Force in recent years.

              US Air Forces’ X-37B

A short statement from China’s state-run Xinhua media outlet announced the launch from the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in northwest China on Friday.

“After a period of in-orbit operation, the spacecraft will return to the scheduled landing site in China. It will test reusable technologies during its flight, providing technological support for the peaceful use of space,” the statement reads.

The mission was conducted under a veil of extra secrecy, with no official launch photos or even the time of launch made public.

“That leads one to think this is not only a space plane, it’s a military space plane,” said Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics astronomer Jonathan McDowell on a European Space Agency sponsored Zoom conference Friday.

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China Leads Charge in Space Race

Article by Brandon J. Weichert                              September 3, 2020                                   (washingtontimes.com)

• China yearns to displace the United States as the dominant space power, and to inspire its people to make China a global hub of scientific research and development – the cornerstone of a knowledge-based economy. By placing the first rover on the dark side of the Moon in 2019, and by being the first nation to construct a lunar colony or to land ‘taikonauts’ on Mars, China is telling the world that it is truly the leader of today’s knowledge-based economy.

• But as China ascends, America is in decline. In 2019, on the 50th anniversary of the Apollo moon landings, a Harris Poll asked young people in both the United States and China what they wanted to be when they grow up. Most of the American youth surveyed said they wanted to be professional “Vlogger/YouTubers” when they grow up. The Chinese youth overwhelmingly aspired to be astronauts.

• In the 1970s and 80s, China made great wealth by becoming the world’s sweatshop. In the 1990s, China invested that wealth in infrastructure to build a large middle class and a stable economy. This was all part of China’s long-term plan to ultimately become the dominant knowledge-based economy in the world. Today, China is at the forefront of quantum computing, biotech, alternative energy, artificial intelligence, cloud computing and space technologies.

• In 2018, the head of China’s lunar program, Ye Peijian, put their national space ambitions this way: “The universe is an ocean, the Moon is [an island], Mars is [an island]. If we don’t get to [these islands] now, even though we’re capable of doing so, then we will be blamed by our descendants. If others go there, then they will take over, and you won’t be able to go even if you want to. This is reason enough [to go to the Moon and beyond].”

• Meanwhile, American leadership oscillates between indifference and abdication on the matter of space policy. President Donald J. Trump has developed a truly robust national space policy, but his policies and his new military branch, Space Force, are only met with derision by bureaucratic lawmakers. Democrats on Capitol Hill have already stated that Trump’s plans to return American astronauts to the lunar surface by 2024 will not be fiscally possible. NASA’s director of manned spaceflight challenges the very notion of successfully returning astronauts to the Moon before the decade is over.

• The future belongs to the country that wants it more. Without higher levels of funding, the Space Force will never mature into the robust force it must become to defend American interests in the strategic high ground of space. The American nationalist call to greatness is being squelched by the globalist demand for mediocrity. Without the embrace of nationalism in the United States, the country’s national mission in space will end in failure and its people will stop dreaming. America’s greatness will erode at every level.

• [Editor’s Note] How could America fall behind in the space race you ask? It was by design. Just after the Roswell crash in July 1947, Truman appointed twelve military, intelligence and scientific officials to form a secret group whose purpose was to hide from the public all evidence of the advanced extraterrestrial beings that were visiting the Earth, and to hide the fact that we were building our own space fleets and colonizing the solar system. This group is known as Majestic 12, and it still exists in the dark corridors of the deep state government’s power elite.

MJ-12 would use any means available to keep the truth from the American public, from ridiculing anyone who claimed to have seen a UFO or an alien being (and basically ruining their lives), to directing deep state funded media, scientists and academia to never take sightings seriously. The result has been generations of Americans who are conditioned to scoff at and ignore anything pertaining to UFOs and extraterrestrials. The deep state government doesn’t want people interested in exploring space. The deep state driven military hawks and corporate owners want to have space all to themselves and the advanced space technology that goes with it. They simply deny that any of it exists. Deep state legislators routinely reject spending on space endeavors and laugh at the notion of a Space Force. They want to keep a lid on the enormous fraud that has been perpetrated on an unwitting public since World War II.

On the other hand, the Chinese have encouraged space exploration for both its national pride and to usurp American geopolitical and exopolitical dominance. Indeed, the deep state has become entrenched within the Chinese government as well, and will try to keep its space empire a secret. But how long can it be before countries such as China, Russia and India have pushed their way into deep space, and these ubiquitous deep state Secret Space Programs become obvious? The deep state won’t be able to hide the truth for very much longer.

 

On the 50th anniversary of the Apollo moon landings, Harris Poll asked young people in the United States and China what they wanted to be when they grew up. The results were strange. Most American youth surveyed — the young people who belonged to the only country to have ever placed astronauts on the lunar surface — admitted that they wanted to be professional “Vlogger/YouTubers” when they grew up. It was the Chinese youth

                          Ye Peijian

who overwhelmingly aspired to be astronauts.

Speaking to Chinese state media in 2018, the head of China’s lunar program, Ye Peijian, outlined the Chinese view of their national space strategy in explicit geopolitical terms, specifically in naval terminology: “The universe is an ocean, the moon is the Diaoyu Islands [sic], Mars is Huangyan Island. If we don’t get there now even though we’re capable of doing so, then we will be blamed by our descendants. If others go there, then they will take over, and you won’t be able to go even if you want to. This is reason enough [to go to the moon and beyond].”

China made great wealth by becoming the world’s sweatshop in the 1970s and ’80s. Throughout the 1990s, it reinvested that wealth into building out the infrastructure needed to both support an enlarged middle class and to ensure that China moved up the international development ladder.

China’s leadership never intended to remain just an industrial power subordinated to the United States in the post-industrial, knowledge-based
economy. China planned to become the dominant knowledge-based economy in the world. They have pioneered many innovations in the new industrial economy, notably 5G Internet, but are also heavily invested in quantum computing, biotech, alternative energy, artificial intelligence, cloud computing and space technologies.

For China, these new scientific innovations are not merely about making more money or even gaining a military edge over the West (Beijing certainly does care about those things). More than that, though, China yearns to displace the United States and dominant space power simply out of national pride.

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Space Weapons to Counter China and Russia

Article by Dave Makichuk                                August 28, 2020                                 (asiatimes.com)

• The Pentagon and President Trump consider space to be a warfighting domain on par with land, air and sea. And the newly established US Space Command indeed faces a clear and present danger. China has already tested anti-satellite missiles, while Russia has deployed on-orbit systems that could threaten US satellites. America’s adversaries now have the ability to use jammers, ground-based lasers, ground- and space-based kinetic weapons, attack ground facilities that support space operations or even carry out a nuclear detonation in space.

• “As a geographical combatant command focused on the space domain, those are the things that keep us up at night,” says Army National Guard Major General Tim Lawson. But Lawson told the virtual audience at the National Defense Industrial Association’s Space Warfighting Industry Forum (on August 21st) that America has new capabilities are on the way to mitigate the threat. But these capabilities classified as “black budget” projects, and he can’t tell you about them.

• “A lot of times you listen to that threat picture and you kind of get a little dismayed at what you’re seeing, but then you look at our side and — trust me — we’ve got some things coming. So, it’s good news,” said Lawson.

• Lawson highlighted the need to have resilient space architectures that utilize large networks of small communications and intelligence-gathering satellites that would be less vulnerable to enemy attacks. “If you had hundreds of small satellites up there in a constellation … the enemy can take out quite a few of those and it will really never have an impact on us,” he said. “That really is the resiliency piece that we’re seeking out there and we need.” The ‘Spacecom’ command is also interested in developments in space logistics such as on-orbit refueling or servicing of satellites. Lawson says that if American industry could put assets into orbit to overwhelm adversaries’ ability to shoot them down, “it would be a game-changer”.

• But it’s not the first time a US president has launched a major military defense project in space. President Ronald Reagan envisioned a Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) as an array of space-based X-ray lasers would detect and deflect any nukes headed toward the United States. On March 23, 1983, Reagan called upon the US scientists who “gave us nuclear weapons to turn their great talents to the cause of mankind and world peace: to give us the means of rendering these nuclear weapons impotent and obsolete.”

• But politicians and scientists argued that SDI was overambitious. Massachusetts Senator Edward Kennedy referred to it as Reagan’s ”reckless ‘Star Wars’ schemes.” The “Star Wars” moniker stuck. Over the course of 10 years, the government spent up to $30 billion on developing the concept without achieving operational status. It was scrapped by President Bill Clinton in 1993.

[Editor’s Note]   So where did this $30 billion go? By coincidence, the 1980’s was when the US Navy created and deployed its deep space fleet of eight oversized submarine-type warp drive spacecraft known as ‘Solar Warden’, unbeknownst to the public.

 

To say that officials at the newly established US Space Command face a clear and present danger, is an understatement.

                       Tim Lawson

America’s adversaries now have the ability to use jammers, ground-based lasers, ground- and space-based kinetic weapons, attack ground facilities that support space operations or even carry out a nuclear detonation in space.

               Ronald Reagan

China has already tested anti-satellite missiles, while Russia has deployed on-orbit systems that could threaten US satellites.

But according to Army National Guard Major General Tim Lawson, new capabilities are on the way to mitigate the threat — he just can’t tell you about them, because they are classified under the umbrella of “black budget” projects.

“As a geographical combatant command focused on the space domain, those are the things that keep us up at night,” said Lawson, who made the remarks at the National Defense Industrial Association’s Space Warfighting Industry Forum, which was held virtually due to the Covid-19 pandemic.

                Sen. Edward Kennedy

“I would love to sit behind some closed doors and have this discussion on some of the things we really think we need,” Lawson said when asked about the types of capabilities Spacecom is seeking.

“A lot of times you listen to that threat picture and you kind of get a little dismayed at what you’re seeing, but then you look at our side and — trust me — we’ve got some things coming. So, it’s good news.”

Significant portions of the US military’s space programs are classified, making it difficult for outside observers to know what’s coming down the pike.

Meanwhile, Lawson highlighted the need to have resilient space architectures that utilize large networks of small communications and intelligence-gathering satellites that would be less vulnerable to enemy attacks.

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