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Here Are Some Scientists Arguing That UFOs Exist

Article by Jason St. Jacques                                September 2, 2020                              (filmdaily.co)

• With social media and recent announcements by the U.S. Navy, more than ever believers are pushing to prove UFOs exist. The scientific community is beginning to change their dialogue on UFOs. Here are all (some) of the outspoken scientists arguing for the existence of UFOs.

Michael Masters – A biological anthropology professor at the University of Montana, Masters believes that the aliens that we see buzzing around in their UFO craft are actually humans from the future. Master’s discusses his theory in his book, Identified Flying Objects: A Multidisciplinary Scientific Approach to the UFO Phenomenon (2019). “We know that we’ve had a long evolutionary history on this planet,” says Masters. “And we know our technology is going to be more advanced in the future. I think the simplest explanation, innately, is that it is us.”

Helen Sharman – A scientist and Britain’s first astronaut, Sharman spent eight days on the Soviet Mir space station in 1991. When she returned, she stated unequivocally, “aliens exist, there’s no two ways about it.” She even believes many of us have had encounters with aliens during our lives and didn’t know. In January 2020, Sharman told The Observer, “There are so many billions of stars out there in the universe that there must be all sorts of different forms of life.” “It’s possible they’re here right now and we simply can’t see them.”

Kevin Knuth – A NASA researcher and assistant professor of physics at the University of Albany in NY, Knuth says that “there’s plenty of evidence to support UFO sightings,” although researching UFOs is “extremely challenging”. Knuth points to the recent UFO sightings by the US military, “[S]ome of the strange flying objects that outperform the best aircraft in our (military) inventory and defy explanation may indeed be visitors from afar.” He also notes the wide array of multiple witnesses, photographic evidence, and patterns of UFO activity. In Knuth’s opinion, the biggest issue with the topic of UFOs is the taboo nature it has in the scientific community.

Alexander Wendt – An author & political scientist, Wendt admits to being frustrated with the scientific community for their underwhelming reaction to new evidence on UFOs & alien life. He is intrigued by the unknown something blocking scientists from taking UFO studies seriously. Says Wendt, “[A]nything else even remotely this interesting would generate limitless research dollars.” He told Vox, “[I]f ETs were discovered, it would be the most important event in human history.”

Andrew Fraknoi – A former professor of astronomy at Foothill College in California and a member of the board for the SETI in Mountain View, California, Fraknoi believes that aliens may be among us, but arrived in the form of microorganisms – casting aside the theory of green people. From our lands to our oceans, it’s hard to keep track of everything falling to Earth.

[Editor’s Note]   Hey Jason St. Jacques, how did you miss Dr. Eric Davis, prominent Earthtech astrophysicist who has worked on black budget Pentagon UFO programs since 2007, and who told Pentagon officials last March about retrievals of “off-world vehicles not made on this Earth,” according to a July 23rd New York Times article? (see ExoArticle here)

 

                  Michael Masters

With the help of social media and even recent announcements by the U.S. Navy, more than ever believers

                 Helen Sharman

are pushing to prove UFOs exist. If fuzzy pictures or government conspiracies aren’t enough to convince you, maybe these scientists can.

From documenting key evidence to tightening their arguments, the scientific community is changing the dialogue on UFOs. Here are all the outspoken scientists arguing for the existence of UFOs.

UFOs exist: So do Earthlings from the future

Refusing to denounce the recent stockpile of images & testimonials of UFO sightings is the stance of Michael Masters – a biological anthropology professor at the University of Montana.

        Alexander Wendt

In the argument for the existence of UFOs, Masters doesn’t think these objects are the vehicle of choice for little green people. Instead, Masters proposed UFOs are driven by humans from

                           Kevin Knuth

the future. Master’s discussed the theory in his book, Identified Flying Objects: A Multidisciplinary Scientific Approach to the UFO Phenomenon (2019).

Putting stake in the greater proof of UFOs than of aliens, Masters discussed his theory with Leonard Davis from Space.com. Davis theorized, “We know that we’ve had a long evolutionary history on this planet. And we know our technology is going to be more advanced in the future. I think the simplest explanation, innately, is that it is us.”

An astronaut knows aliens are real

Scientist & astronaut Helen Sharman was Britain’s first astronaut. Sharman took a trip to the Soviet Mir space station in 1991, and returned with a conclusive thought: “aliens exist, there’s no two ways about it.”

          Andrew Fraknoi

Sharman spent eight days working in space as a chemist and researcher. She even believes many of us may have had encounters with aliens during our lives and didn’t know. If perspective from the ground isn’t enough to convince you, what about from someone who’s seen our very

                      Dr. Eric Davis

civilization from above?

In January 2020 Sharman told The Observer, “There are so many billions of stars out there in the universe that there must be all sorts of different forms of life” – although Sharman doesn’t know if they’re carbon-based like humans. She even suggested, “It’s possible they’re here right now and we simply can’t see them.”

UFOs exist: They’re worth a “serious study”

Those are the beliefs of Kevin Knuth – a NASA researcher and assistant professor of physics at the University of Albany in NY. Knuth remembered always being interested in UFOs, and professed, “there’s plenty of evidence to support UFO sightings.”

With a firm understanding of the scientific method, Knuth admitted studying or testing for UFOs is “extremely challenging” – the appearance of UFOs can’t just be repeated. Knuth discussed the “discrepancy between the expectation that there should be evidence of . . . and the presumption that no visitations have been observed.”

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Efforts To Search For, Send Messages To Extraterrestrial Life Advance In Digital Age

by Molly McCrea and Juliette Goodrich                 April 25, 2019                   (sanfrancisco.cbslocal.com)

• In 1977, NASA scientists installed a golden record on two space probes that were part of the Voyager Mission. On each copy were dozens of images, sounds from nature, and multiple greetings in 55 different languages. The record also contained music from around the world, and included classical as well as a recording of Chuck Berry’s “Johnny B Goode.” “This was a way of telling another civilization about us,” explained the legendary astronomer and astrophysicist Frank Drake.

• Drake and fellow astrophysicist, the late Carl Sagan, also wrote what’s known as the Arecibo Message in 1974, the first interstellar radio message sent from earth to a globular star cluster known as M13 in hopes that extraterrestrial intelligence could receive and decipher it.

• Drake and Sagan also designed what is known as the Pioneer plaques. These plaques were another kind of message from earth that scientists hoped would be intercepted by extraterrestrial beings from the 1972 Pioneer 10 and the 1973 Pioneer 11 spacecraft missions.

• In 2015, Russian billionaire Yuri Milner unveiled a project called the “Breakthrough Initiatives” to search for extraterrestrial intelligence over the span of at least 10 years. Part of the Initiatives program includes a $1M Breakthrough Message competition, where the task is to design a digital message to send to advanced civilizations. But no message has yet been sent. And some, such as Doug Vakoch who heads up: Messaging Extraterrestrial Intelligence (METI), want to send the messages now and hear back from other civilizations. He explained that the messages would be sent by radio or in the near future, by lasers using very brief laser pulses.

• Not everyone agrees we should be rapidly concocting and sending messages. Stargazer Alicia Adams says, “I’ve seen Mars Attacks and that ended horribly!” Retired Professor of Astronomy Andrew Fraknoi says it’s a question over which space scientists are now grappling. “If we’re going to be deciding to advertise our presence to the universe, we should have a discussion with the rest of the world,” said Fraknoi. “Are we ready to signal out there that we on earth exist? We are barely getting along with each other. Are we ready to get along with aliens?”

• Drake thinks intelligent beings already know we’re here due to television and radio signals traveling in space. “It’s too late, folks. We’ve made our presence known big-time,” said Drake.

• A recent survey by Glocalities involving 24 countries found nearly half of all humans believe in extraterrestrials.

 

An ambitious new effort is underway to make direct contact with intelligent life beyond earth, improving upon 70s-era space missions which included attempts to bring messages from Earth to extraterrestrials.

For centuries, we’ve gazed up at the stars, and wondered are we alone? Some say it is time to move more aggressively and find out.

In early April, NASA’s newest planet hunter called the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) discovered its first Earth-sized alien planet. A recent survey by Glocalities involving 24 countries found nearly half of all humans believe in extraterrestrials.

                Frank Drake

ETs are on our mind. At the California Academy of Sciences in Golden Gate Park, an entire evening’s event was all about extraterrestrials. A special dance troupe performed to an eclectic mix of sounds. The sounds were excerpts taken from a famous golden record, intended for intelligent life in the universe. The 12-inch copper gold plated disk is known as the Pioneer Golden Record.

Artist Katerina Wong choreographed the performance and was thrilled to know its history.

“They were hoping if there was an opportunity to meet an ET, that they would get a little bit of understanding about what life on earth was like.” remarked Wong.

In 1977, NASA scientists installed a golden record on two space probes that were part of the Voyager Mission.

On each copy were dozens of images, sounds from nature, and multiple greetings in 55 different languages. The record also contained music from around the world, and included classical as well as a recording of Chuck Berry’s “Johnny B Goode.”

According to NASA, the Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 are exploring where nothing from Earth has flown before. Their primary mission was the exploration of Jupiter and Saturn in our own solar system but now, both probes are billions of miles away from earth – carrying a message from earth on these golden records. The hope was that somewhere beyond our solar system, intelligent life or advanced civilizations will find them and be able to decipher their contents.
“This was a way of telling another civilization about us,” explained the legendary astronomer and astrophysicist Frank Drake.

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FAIR USE NOTICE: This page contains copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. ExoNews.org distributes this material for the purpose of news reporting, educational research, comment and criticism, constituting Fair Use under 17 U.S.C § 107. Please contact the Editor at ExoNews with any copyright issue.

Fear of What’s Out There Causes Big Split Among Space Scientists

by Peter Fimrite            February 25, 2019                   (sfchronicle.com)

• A faction of the San Francisco-based SETI (Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) has split off to form METI, or Messaging Extraterrestrial Intelligence. While SETI traditionalists believe humans should only look and listen for extraterrestrials to avoid tipping off evil aliens, the METI group intends to broadcast messages to space aliens. The clash is the first major division in the tight-knit community of astronomers, astrophysicists, philosophers, psychologists and science fiction writers who are convinced intelligent beings are out there somewhere.

• SETI has been searching in vain for radio signals or some other sign of life beyond Earth from its Bay Area Mountain View headquarters for 35 years. Astrobiologist Douglas Vakoch, who split with the METI group, says, “What if [the ET’s] position is, ‘No, you are the ones who are new to this game. You send us a signal first.’” METI will employ radar and laser technology to beam more powerful multi-directional messages into space.

• SETI astronomers are worried that less-then-friendly extraterrestrials might be more inclined to enslave Earthlings and mercilessly plunder and destroy Earth. “We wonder whether the galaxy that we are in is maybe a dark forest, where it is dangerous to scream because there are creatures out there unhappy with new life forms,” said astronomer Andrew Fraknoi. “You don’t want to advertise your presence in a dark forest.” Stephen Hawking was among those who warned that aliens “may not see us as any more valuable than we see bacteria.”

• Vakoch formed METI after a vote in 2014 by the SETI Institute board rejecting his plans to broadcast messages. Vakoch and his supporters reason that any predatory civilization would probably have detected us by now, since our radar, radio and television signals would long ago have signaled our presence. They began sending active signals into space in 2017. “We may have to target hundreds and thousands and maybe millions of stars before we find anything.” Says Vakoch. “I view this as a reflection of the natural growth of SETI.”

• Using Earth’s current technology, it would take 80,000 years for an astronaut to reach the closest star, Alpha Centauri. Fraknoi speculates that self-replicating civilizations could travel through space for thousands of years and still be alive to tell about it when the trip is over.

• Seth Shostak, a senior astronomer at the SETI Institute who supports Vakoch’s work, says that given the enormous distances, we may never find intelligent life if we don’t get out there and look for it. “No transmissions into the sky because there might be nasty aliens out there.’ That’s just paranoia. Paranoia is not a good long-term policy.”

• The issue moved to the forefront in 1989 when SETI scientists published a declaration of principles on how international leaders should be consulted before anyone replies to an ET signal. A committee of the International Academy of Astronautics took it a step further in the 1990’s, urging consultations with world leaders before anyone attempts to broadcast a powerful message into space that is likely to be detectable by alien life.

• “Human history is littered with examples of societies disrupted by direct contact with others, even when it was led by idealistic missionaries,” Says Michael Michaud, former director of the State Department’s Office of Space and Advanced Technology. “Ignore the Hollywood scenario of reptilian aliens landing on Earth’s surface to conquer our planet. They would not need to use futuristic weapons; the correct pesticide would do.”

[Editor’s Note]  Could the real purpose for these “scientists” to labor in vain for decades be to simply to create a disinformation campaign to make people believe that ‘smart people’ are actively looking for alien beings, and since they haven’t officially found any, then we can presume that there are no aliens out there?  Mainstream science willfully denies the ample proof that dozens of different extraterrestrial species have visited the Earth over the past seventy years. Some alien species are positive and some are negative. The positive ones abide by a galactic law of non-interference with a low-level developing species such as we humans on Earth. The negative ones however, which do include the Draco Reptilians, couldn’t give a hoot about galactic law. But their M.O. is not to wipe us out and take over the planet. They prefer to keep us mind-controlled, determining what we are allowed to know, and using us as slave workers to generate an economic and industrial resource that they can exploit to continue to build out their own secret space program, off-world bases and colonies. Also, the system is set up so that humans must perpetually endure emotional fear, confusion, hardship, conflict and war, in order to create a form of energetic sustenance called ‘loosh’, which the higher negative Archon beings require. If we all woke up, turned to the loving Creator, and denied these negative beings all of this negative energy, this perverted system would collapse virtually overnight.

 

A cosmic rift has opened between Bay Area astronomers and a splinter group of San Francisco stargazers who are hell-bent on contacting space aliens, hang the consequences.

       Douglas Vakoch

The schism pits the traditionalists, who believe humans should only look and listen for extraterrestrials to avoid tipping off evil aliens, against a rebel faction that wants to broadcast messages to intelligent beings, assuming they are altruistic.
The battle is so heated that one prominent scientist quit the Mountain View group known as SETI, or Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence, to form METI, or Messaging Extraterrestrial Intelligence.

    Andrew Fraknoi

“We’ve always assumed the extraterrestrials were looking for us,” Vakoch said. But “what if their position is, ‘No, you are the ones who are new to this game. You send us a signal first.’”

SETI has been searching for radio signals or some other sign of life beyond Earth from its Mountain View headquarters for 35 years, but with nothing to show for its effort, Vakoch and other restless alien hunters are insisting on a more active search, including employing radar and laser technology to beam more powerful multidirectional messages into space.

The problem, many SETI astronomers warn, is that, instead of an intergalactic kumbaya, intelligent extraterrestrials might very well be more inclined to enslave Earthlings and mercilessly plunder and destroy Earth.

Those who adhere to this dark theory imagine humanity as a childlike form of life lost in an Amazonian jungle crawling with skulking predators, said Andrew Fraknoi, a SETI Institute board member.

                  Seth Shostak

“We wonder whether the galaxy that we are in is maybe a dark forest, where it is dangerous to scream because there are creatures out there unhappy with new life forms,” said Fraknoi, an astronomer who will be teaching a course in April called Aliens in Science and Science Fiction at the University of San Francisco’s Fromm Institute. “With every strong signal we send out, we advertise our presence, and you don’t want to advertise your presence in a dark forest.”

The clash represents the first major division in the traditionally tight-knit community of astronomers, astrophysicists, philosophers, psychologists and science fiction writers who are convinced intelligent beings are out there somewhere.
Vakoch and his supporters, including some astronomers at SETI, call the dark forest analogy silly. Any predatory civilization would probably have detected us by now simply by analyzing our atmosphere, they reason. Humans, Vakoch said, have been using radar, which can purportedly be detected 70 light-years away, since World War II. Television and radio signals would long ago have signaled our presence to malevolent space ruffians, he said.

          Michael Michaud

Unconcerned about an invasion of intergalactic invertebrates who are out for our heads, Vakoch adapted a transmitter and used a Norwegian observatory in late 2017 to send a message 12.4 light-years away to Luyten’s Star, a red dwarf with a large planet in the constellation Canis Minor.

He spent years developing the message, combining mathematics and the fundamentals of language that he believes even a blind alien could understand. It was the first of what Vakoch hopes will be many signals sent by his group.
“Our goal is to say we are interested in making contact,” Vakoch said. “We may have to target hundreds and thousands and maybe millions of stars before we find anything. I view this as a reflection of the natural growth of SETI.”

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