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UFOs Deserve Scientific Investigation

Article by Ravi Kopparapu and Jacob Haqq-Misra          July 27, 2020                 (scientificamerican.com)

• UFOs have been back in the news because of “unidentified aerial phenomena” videos officially released by the Pentagon. But the UFO phenomenon is a worldwide occurrence. Scientists in several other countries have studied them. Shouldn’t American scientists choose to investigate and curb the speculation around them? An interdisciplinary scientific investigation is needed, while discarding the taboo surrounding this phenomenon.

• Such unexplained UFO cases drew interest by scientists during the 1960s. As a result, the US Air Force funded a scientific group at the University of Colorado, headed by physicist Edward Condon, to review UFO cases from 1966 to 1968. The resulting ‘Condon Report’ concluded that further study of UFOs was unlikely to be scientifically interesting. Concerns over the inadequacy of the methods used by the Condon Report culminated with a debate sponsored by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in 1969, with participation by scholars such as Carl Sagan, J. Allen Hynek, James McDonald, Robert Hall and Robert Baker.

• Regarding the 1969 scientific debate, Sagan wrote of the “strong opposition” by scientists who feared that AAAS sponsorship of the debate would lend credence to ‘unscientific’ ideas. While Sagan himself dismissed the extraterrestrial hypothesis, he still claimed that the UFO subject was worthy of scientific inquiry.

• We, as scientists, should be cautious of outright dismissal of the UFO phenomenon by assuming that every instance has a “scientific” explanation. We must let scientific curiosity be the spearhead of understanding such phenomena. But these recent Navy pilots’ accounts of UFO sightings have failed to generate similar interest among the scientific community.

• Why should astronomers, meteorologists, and planetary scientists care about these UFO events? Because we are scientists. Curiosity is the reason we became scientists. UFOs represent observations that are waiting to be explained, just like any other science discovery. A systematic investigation is essential in order to bring the phenomena into mainstream science. Collection of hard data is paramount to establishing any credibility to the explanation of the phenomena. A rigorous scientific analysis is sorely needed, by multiple independent study groups.

• The transient nature of UFOs, and the unpredictability of when and where the next event will happen, is one of the main reasons why UFOs have not been taken seriously in science circles. But how can one identify a pattern without systematically collecting the data in the first place? In astronomy, the location and timing of gamma-ray bursts, supernovae and gravitational waves are similarly unpredictable. By meticulously collecting data from each occurrence and systematically observing them, we now recognize these as natural phenomena arising from stellar evolution. Similarly, gathering UFO data with tools such as radar, thermal, and visual observations would be immensely helpful. Not every case is a classified military aircraft or strange weather formation.

• As Sagan concluded at the 1969 debate, “scientists are particularly bound to have open minds; this is the lifeblood of science.” We do not know what UFOs are. This is precisely the reason that we as scientists should study them.

[Editor’s Note]   Back in the 1960s, the Condon Report didn’t stand a chance of seeing the light of ‘scientific curiosity and impartiality’. The deep state jackels had just gotten away with assassinating a sitting US President, and they felt invincible. The 1969 Condon Report was a set up, just like the Warren Commission. Even Carl Sagen, who played the role of the open-minded advocate of scientific curiosity, was later revealed to be an actual member of the top-secret Majestic 12 deep state UFO government debunking committee.

The question is, has the deep state lost its absolute control over the modern scientific community to a point where there are, in fact, some independent scientists who would make an impartial inquiry into the UFO phenomenon and reveal their objective findings to the public? Or will these scientists continue to bow to the deep state governmental authorities and private foundations that provide the funding for their work, and thus their livelihood?

 

UFOs have been back in the news because of videos initially leaked, and later confirmed, by the U.S. Navy and officially released by Pentagon that purportedly show “unidentified aerial phenomena” (UAP) in our skies. Speculations about their nature have run the gamut from mundane objects like birds or balloons to visitors from outer space.

It’s difficult, if not impossible, to say what these actually are, however, without context. What happened before and after these video snippets? Were there any simultaneous observations from other instruments, or sightings by pilots?

Judging the nature of these objects (and these seem to be “objects,” as confirmed by the Navy) needs a coherent explanation that should accommodate and connect all the facts of the events. And this is where interdisciplinary scientific investigation is needed.

The proposal to scientifically study UAP phenomena is not new. The problem of understanding such unexplained UAP cases drew interest by scientists during the 1960s, which resulted in the U.S. Air Force funding a group at the University of Colorado, headed by physicist Edward Condon, to study UAP from 1966 to 1968. The resulting Condon Report concluded that further study of UAP was unlikely to be scientifically interesting—a conclusion that drew mixed reactions from scientists and the public.

Concerns over the inadequacy of the methods used by the Condon Report culminated with a congressional hearing in 1968 as well as a debate sponsored by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in 1969 with participation by scholars such as Carl Sagan, J. Allen Hynek, James McDonald, Robert Hall and Robert Baker. Hynek was an astronomy professor at the Ohio State University and led the Project Blue Book investigation, while McDonald, who was a well-known meteorologist and a member of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) and AAAS, performed a thorough investigation of UAP phenomena. Sagan, a professor of astronomy at Cornell University, was one of the organizers of the AAAS debate. He dismissed the extraterrestrial hypothesis as unlikely but still considered the UAP subject worthy of scientific inquiry.

Recent UAP sightings, however, have so far failed to generate similar interest among the scientific community. Part of the reason could be the apparent taboo around UAP phenomena, connecting it to the paranormal or pseudoscience, while ignoring the history behind it. Sagan even wrote in the afterword of the 1969 debate proceedings about the “strong opposition” by other scientists who were “convinced that AAAS sponsorship would somehow lend credence to ‘unscientific’ ideas.” As scientists we must simply let scientific curiosity be the spearhead of understanding such phenomena. We should be cautious of outright dismissal by assuming that every UAP phenomena must be explainable.

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What Would We Say to Extraterrestrials?

Listen to “E70 8-19-19 What Would We Say to Extraterrestrials?” on Spreaker.

Article by Gwynne Dyer                    August 6, 2019                     (winnipegfreepress.com)

• In July, London’s Royal Society and the U.K. SETI Research Network launched a survey on the subject of public attitudes toward alien contact. Martin Dominik, an astronomer at the University of St. Andrews in Fife, Scotland joined the discussion by advocating a legally binding framework in international law for responding to a signal received from an alien civilization. It would be prudent to make these policy determinations now, rather than sometime in the future in the midst of the inevitable media circus that would erupt with proof of other intelligent life in the universe.

• In 2015, SETI launched its ‘Breakthrough Listen’ project, funded by Russian-Israeli tech billionaire Yuri Milner. The project buys thousands of hours of time on the world’s most powerful radio telescopes over a ten year period to search over a million stars for artificial radio or laser signals. Merely listening for alien signals is known as “passive SETI”. The debate arises when SETI officials contemplate replying to an alien signal. So far, SETI has not found any alien signals.

• So why haven’t we found any alien signals coming from extraterrestrial planets? One reason is that SETI’s eavesdropping range can only go so far into the galaxy. Another possible reason is that other civilizations are maintaining radio silence because there is something big and bad and dangerous lurking out there in the dark, and they do not want to attract its attention. This theory is known as the “Dark Forest Problem”.

• Chinese science-fiction writer Liu Cixin is the author of the popular Three-Body Problem trilogy, which traces the calamitous consequences over 400 years of an alien-contact scenario, initiated by well-meaning human beings, that goes desperately wrong. Some astronomers look to this as a cautionary tale.

• In 2015, the American Association for the Advancement of Science debated whether it was wise for SETI (the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) to actively send out signals to other planets. Should we advertise our existence, or is that just asking for trouble? After all, if 1950’s sci fi movies are any indication, they may be bug-eyed monsters intent on abducting half-naked Earth maidens. The scientists supported a declaration that a “worldwide scientific, political and humanitarian discussion must occur before any message is sent.”

• Should we be worried about marauding aliens coming to Earth? The current mainstream scientific consensus is that interstellar travel is virtually impossible because it would take too long to travel such distances to make it worthwhile. But we still have much to learn. We may be unaware of a type of physics and technology that would overcome the long distance obstacle. Therefore, distance alone might not be enough to protect us from any ill-intentioned bug-eyed monsters with a sufficiently high level of technology.

• Yuri Milner and SETI are working on another program called “Breakthrough Message” to craft a message that we could send in response to an alien signal. The program heads had pledged “not to transmit any message until there has been a global debate at high levels of science and politics on the risks and rewards of contacting advanced civilizations.”

[Editor’s Note]   Once again, the Deep State asset known as SETI is furthering its mission to keep pumping out disinformation. They want the public to think that SETI’s unsuccessful search for alien civilizations means that there are no extraterrestrials in our cosmic vicinity, which is a lie. The universe, our galaxy, and our particular cluster of star systems is teeming with intelligent extraterrestrial life.  They are not only in communication with us but actively influencing our global reality, and not in a good way. The Deep State also wants the public to fear these extraterrestrials, so that when the ET presence is revealed, the public will turn to these compromised institutions to save us. But most of all, they want the public to be complacent in believing that the scientific community is on top of this, assuring us that if they do come across an alien signal, we will be the first to know. Don’t count on it.

 

“There is absolutely no procedure enshrined in international law to respond to a signal from an alien civilization,” said Martin Dominik, an astronomer at the University of St. Andrews. “It makes sense to create a legally binding framework that is properly rooted in international law.”

Well, yes, it would make sense. But if the Bug-Eyed Monsters do send a message, would we really want to reply at all?

Bug-eyed monsters, generally portrayed carrying off half-naked Earth maidens with evil intent, were a standard feature of pulp science fiction in the 1950s. We are all more sophisticated now, of course, but fear of alien contact is not necessarily irrational.

The specific reason for Dominik’s remarks is a survey of public attitudes toward alien contact that was launched last month by London’s Royal Society and the U.K. SETI Research Network, but in broader terms it is a response to two important developments in the search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI) that occurred in 2015.

One was a debate at the American Association for the Advancement of Science convention in 2015 about whether “active SETI” was a good idea. Should we advertise our existence and publish our address to the cosmos, or is that just asking for trouble? Many of the scientists present backed a declaration that a “worldwide scientific, political and humanitarian discussion must occur before any message is sent.”

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What Would Happen If UFOs Tried to Contact Earth?

by Sebastian Kettley                     August 20, 2018                     (express.co.uk)

• Are the people of earth ready for open extraterrestrial contact? A September 2015 YouGov poll found more than 56 percent of Germans believed in the existence of alien life. The German Ministry of Economics, however, said it considered aliens visiting the earth “extremely unlikely according to current scientific knowledge”.

• An August 2017 survey conducted by 20th Century Fox film studio found nearly half of all Americans believe in aliens. Almost as many were certain aliens are visiting Earth on a regular basis but less than 20 percent found stories of alien abductions genuine. Even less claimed to have ever seen a UFO.

• A report published by the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 2018 found people across the board would react positively to alien visitors. Michael Varnum of Arizona State University said based on a mix of media headlines and surveys, the overall public response would be optimistic.

• How would the earth’s institutions respond to first contact? The International Academy of Astronautics (IAA) stipulates anyone who encounters extraterrestrial signals has to immediately broadcast them to the rest of the world. The Post-Detection Task Group, a branch of the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI), similarly says international governments would have to pool resources together to beam back a joint message.

• The US Air Force’s 527th Space Aggressor Squadron (527 SAS) at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, is the first line of defense against space-based threats. Captain Dustyn Carroll, aggressor training flight commander at the base said, “We then teach joint and coalition forces what adversaries may or may not do, and then we go out and replicate it ourselves.”

• Most scientists today assume first contact with extraterrestrials would be achieved through a clear signal beamed to Earth and not by intercepting alien spacecraft. Seth Shostak of the SETI Institute said, “… [Y]ou would have a press conference and announce this to the world.” Then, says Shostak, he would evacuate from the city as soon as the first UFOs appeared in the skies. Alien visitors capable of reaching Earth would likely have the technology to do how they please with the planet.

[Editor’s Note]   It appears that the people on the planet are far more open and accepting of extraterrestrial contact than are the world’s governments, military and “scientific” organizations set up to deal with extraterrestrial contact. The institutional organizations remain dutifully diligent in denying any current extraterrestrial contact with humanity, and in spreading their skepticism and fear of the ‘dangerous and evil space aliens’. However, their mind-control is beginning to wear off. Greater numbers of ordinary people are not only accepting the existence of extraterrestrials, but are optimistic of a positive relationship developing between ET beings and humans here on earth.

 

A YouGov poll published in September 2015 found more than 56 percent of polled Germans believed in the existence of alien life.

But Germany has “no plans or protocol” if alien visitors ever attempt to contact the human race.

In response to questions submitted to the government, the German Ministry of Economics said it considered such an event “extremely unlikely according to current scientific knowledge”.

The Government said in a statement on the matter: “Concrete cases that could have been subject of bilateral or multilateral talks with other states are not known.”

There is very little in terms of official legislation on how the Earth should collectively react but there are some guidelines set in place by scientific institutions.

The International Academy of Astronautics (IAA) stipulates anyone who encounters extraterrestrial signals has to immediately broadcast them to the rest of the world.

The Post-Detection Task Group, a branch of the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI), similarly says international governments would have to pool resources together to beam back a joint message.

The USA also appears to be greatly prepared for the threat of space-based attacks with an entire unit of the United States Air Force assigned to combating space-cable adversaries.

The 527th Space Aggressor Squadron (527 SAS), stationed at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, is the first line of defence against space-based threats.

The 527 SAS regularly conducts drills and develops techniques to better prepare for attacks from above.

Captain Dustyn Carroll, aggressor training flight commander, said: “We replicate adversary tactics.

“We want to know what our adversaries are capable of, study that and see how we can apply that.

“We then teach joint and coalition forces what adversaries may or may not do, and then we go out and replicate it ourselves.”

An August 2017 survey conducted by film studio 20th Century Fox found nearly half of all Americans believe in aliens.

Almost as many were certain aliens are visiting Earth on a regular basis but less than 20 percent found stories of alien abductions genuine.

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FAIR USE NOTICE: This page contains copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. ExoNews.org distributes this material for the purpose of news reporting, educational research, comment and criticism, constituting Fair Use under 17 U.S.C § 107. Please contact the Editor at ExoNews with any copyright issue.

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