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Space Agency Captures Bizarre Flashes of Light on Dark Side of the Moon

by Sebastian Kettley                     July 30, 2018                         (express.co.uk)

• “On July 17, 2018, an ancient lump from space thwacked into the Moon with enough energy to produce a brilliant flash of light.” “With another rock seemingly in pursuit, a second flash lit up a different region of the Moon almost exactly 24 hours later.” This statement was released by the European Space Agency.

• Three astronomical observatories in Spain scan the Moon on a daily basis for the transient flashes on behalf of the MIDAS project. The observatories use powerful telescopes and CCD cameras to detect and identify the various impacts that rock the glowing orb.

• Despite the force of impact, these “lumps” that hit the Moon were no larger than the average walnut. They most likely originated from the dusty comet trail left behind in the wake of the Alpha Capricornids meteor shower which starts as early as July 15 and continues until mid-August.

 

The bizarre phenomena were observed from Earth by the Moon Impacts Detection and Analysis System (MIDAS) on the nights of July 17 and July 18.

MIDAS observatories in Spain scan the surface of the Moon on a daily basis, in search of asteroid and meteor impacts.

A European Space Agency (ESA) statement revealed the flashes were registered almost exactly 24 hours apart, “seemingly in pursuit” of one another.

Detailed photographs of the Moon’s bumpy surface, captured by high-sensitivity CCD cameras, show the exact moment of impact.

But could this footage be the evidence UFO hunters need to finally settle the debate on whether alien visitors to Earth exist or not?

It is extremely unlikely the lunar photos have anything to do with aliens but both MIDAS and the ESA agree the flashes were very much extraterrestrial in origin.

The ESA said: “On July 17, 2018, an ancient lump from space thwacked into the Moon with enough energy to produce a brilliant flash of light.

“With another rock seemingly in pursuit, a second flash lit up a different region of the Moon almost exactly 24 hours later.”

Despite the force of impact, current estimates suggest the foreign impactors were no larger than the average walnut.

Space rocks of this size dubbed meteoroids are typically remnants of bigger asteroids and comets drifting aimlessly through space.

The flashing meteoroids in question most likely originated from the dusty comet trail left behind in the wake of the Alpha Capricornids meteor shower.

The Alpha Capricornids shower usually starts as early as July 15 and continues until mid-August.

 

4:37 video of light on Moon, with ragtime jazz courtesy of Fox News

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