Space Officials Wooing Intelligence Airmen

Article by Rachel S. Cohen                           May 20, 2020                           (airforcemag.com)

• Space intelligence is one area the military wants to expand and refine for intelligence Airmen who opt to join the Space Force. Space Force intends to build its own core intel capabilities, separate from the Air Force, to better identify objects in space and whether they pose a threat to U.S. assets. Working with the National Reconnaissance Office, Space Force Intelligence will encompass space-based ‘intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance’ (ISR) of the low orbit space between the Earth and the Moon.

• Space Force is considering how Airmen could broaden their understanding of the space domain by working in multiple career fields, according to Colonel Suzy Streeter, Space Force’s ISR director. Building the new service from scratch allows intel professionals hold command positions usually taken by Airmen who operate satellites, for instance, said U.S. Space Command’s ISR boss, Brigadier General Leah Lauderback.

• Adding new perspectives to Space Force leadership depends on how Airmen plan out their career paths. One option is having Space Force recruit start as a ‘space operator’ for the first four years, move into intelligence for ten years, and then decide whether to jump back into space operations or remain in Space Force intel. “That will give… a more integrated approach,” said Streeter. Any intelligence professional coming up the ranks in Space Force could become ‘chief of space operations’ after three to five years. Or an Airman could enter Space Force as a traditional intelligence officer and remain so for the rest of their career. They could still dabble in space operations, as the Force needs “ISR visionaries”.

• It has also been suggested that the service bring in new officer level recruits from the other services and industry, starting them as captains and majors. This could prove beneficial for targeting, intel collection management, and cyber operations. Enlisted personnel could also be ‘streamlined’ into operations intelligence and cryptologic analysis fields.

• All intelligence Airmen can apply to join or transfer into Space Force, whether they worked for Air Combat Command, Air Force Space Command, or another USAF organization. “It is likely that the [selection] board will be looking for personnel with a wide range of experiences, to ensure that USSF does not pigeonhole itself into one way of thinking.” The Space Force is accepting transfer applications from intel Airmen through May 31.

• In October, ‘selection board’ panels staffed by senior Air Force and Space Force leaders will decide which intel, acquisition, and other space professionals will join the Space Force starting February 1st, 2021. This panel will also process promotions until the Space Force’s ‘Space Training and Readiness Command’ (‘STARCOM”) is up-and-running and able to tailor a new process to the specific needs of Space Force.

• New Space Force bases will open up for intelligence assignments that weren’t previously used by the Space Force’s predecessor, Air Force Space Command, including Nellis Air Force Base in Nevada; Lackland Air Force Base in Texas; Fort Meade in Maryland; Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Ohio; and assignments at the Pentagon and in Chantilly, Virginia.

[Editor’s Note]    Space Force Intelligence, just let us know when you would like a briefing.

 

New opportunities will open up for intelligence Airmen who opt to join the Space Force, intel officials said in a recent livestream.

Space intelligence is one area the military wants to expand and refine as a result of creating a new armed force focused on the cosmos. The Space Force envisions building its own core intel capabilities, separate from the Air Force, to better identify what and where objects are in space and if they threaten U.S. assets. The career field will work with the National Reconnaissance Office in new ways, encompass space-based ISR of the Earth below, and is pushing into cislunar orbit as well.

    Brigadier General Leah Lauderback

In March, the Air Force listed several intelligence organizations that are newly assigned to the Space Force. Some officials have suggested that the National Air and Space Intelligence Center could ramp up its help for the Space Force or spin off a separate space-focused center as well.

The Space Force is considering how Airmen could work in multiple career fields to broaden their understanding of the space domain, according to Col. Suzy Streeter, the service’s ISR director. Building the new service from scratch allows it to shake up its leadership echelons and let intel professionals hold command positions usually taken by the Airmen who operate satellites, said Brig. Gen. Leah Lauderback, U.S. Space Command intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance boss.

Adding different perspectives to Space Force leadership depends in part on how Airmen transfer in and plan out their career paths.

One staffing option gaining traction is having every member of the Space Force start as a space operator, or 13S. Someone could serve as a space operator for the first four years, move into intelligence for 10 years, and then decide whether to jump back into space operations or remain in intel, according to the presentation’s slideshow.

“That will give, really, a more integrated approach as you’re looking at futures, including, quite frankly, the chief of space operations,” Streeter said. “Why not have that open to whoever is a space professional?”

READ ENTIRE ARTICLE

 

FAIR USE NOTICE: This page contains copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. ExoNews.org distributes this material for the purpose of news reporting, educational research, comment and criticism, constituting Fair Use under 17 U.S.C § 107. Please contact the Editor at ExoNews with any copyright issue.

Coronavirus Not Slowing Russian or Chinese Space Activities, US General Says

Article by Marcus Weisgerber                             May 12, 2020                          (defenseone.com)

• In an April 15th statement (see here), the US Space Command stated that “satellites, which behaved similar to previous Russian satellites… exhibited characteristics of a space weapon” and that its maneuvers “would be interpreted as irresponsible and potentially threatening.”

• At an event on May 12th, Space Force Vice Commander Lt. Gen. David Thompson (pictured above) said that amid the coronavirus pandemic, “…the Russians’… penchant for unsafe and what I would consider unacceptable behavior in space has not slowed down.” Russia and China continue to launch military rockets and test space weapons, the Vice Commander warned. The US government has postponed several satellite launches due to the pandemic.

• Last month, Russia tested a satellite-killing missile capable of destroying low Earth orbit satellites. US Space Command also criticized Russia for operating two satellites close to American satellites. Earlier this week, a Russian rocket carrying a telescope disintegrated after launch, leaving behind a debris field that threatens satellites orbiting Earth. (see article here) Meanwhile in April, a Chinese rocket carrying an Indonesian satellite failed to reach orbit. (see article here)

 

Russia and China continue to launch military rockets and test space weapons amid the coronavirus pandemic, a top U.S. general said Tuesday.
“Unfortunately in the case of the Russians, their increasing penchant for unsafe and what I would consider unacceptable behavior in space has not slowed down,” Lt. Gen. David Thompson, the U.S. Space Force vice commander, said at a Mitchell Institute event. “I can’t tell you what they’re doing with their crews and their individuals, but based on their macro-level activities, their cadence has certainly not slowed down.”

Russia tested a satellite-killing missile last month, drawing scorn from U.S. military leaders who said the “missile system is capable of destroying satellites in low Earth orbit.” U.S. Space Command also criticized Russia for operating two satellites close to American satellites.

“These satellites, which behaved similar to previous Russian satellites that exhibited characteristics of a space weapon, conducted maneuvers near a U.S. government satellite that would be interpreted as irresponsible and potentially threatening in any other domain,” Space Command said in an April 15 statement.

READ ENTIRE ARTICLE

 

FAIR USE NOTICE: This page contains copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. ExoNews.org distributes this material for the purpose of news reporting, educational research, comment and criticism, constituting Fair Use under 17 U.S.C § 107. Please contact the Editor at ExoNews with any copyright issue.

Navy Laser Creates Plasma ‘UFOs’

Article by David Hambling                          May 11, 2020                        (forbes.com)

• In the 1990s, ‘Laser-Induced Plasma Filaments’ (LIPF) were first developed using intense, short, self-focusing laser pulse to create a glowing filament or channel of plasma, which can be projected a distance of hundreds of meters. This technology underlies the Navy project, which uses LIPFs to create phantom images with infrared emissions to fool heat-seeking missiles.

• The effect is described in a 2018 US Navy patent (see here) “wherein a laser source is mounted on the back of the air vehicle, and wherein the laser source is configured to create a laser-induced plasma, and wherein the laser-induced plasma acts as a decoy for an incoming threat to the air vehicle.” The patent explains that the laser creates a series of mid-air plasma columns, which form a 2D or 3D image by a process of “raster scanning”, similar to how the old-style cathode ray TV sets displayed a picture.

• The LIPF decoy can be created instantly at any desired distance from the aircraft, and can be moved around at will, providing protection for as long as needed. According to the patent: “There can be multiple laser systems mounted on the back of the air vehicle with each laser system generating a ‘ghost image’ such that there would appear to be multiple air vehicles present.”

• “The potential applications of this LIP flare/decoy can be expanded, such as using a helicopter deploying flares to protect a battleship, or using this method to cover and protect a whole battle-group of ships, a military base or an entire city,” according to the patent. The patent’s lead researcher, Alexandru Hening, wrote in the Navy’s IT Magazine that he has been working on laser-induced plasma at Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center Pacific since 2012.

• In the early 1990s, in response to the American ‘Star Wars’ initiative, the Russians claimed that they could produce glowing ‘plasmoids’ at high altitude using high-power microwave or laser beams to disrupt the flight of ballistic missiles. While nothing came of the project, Russia may have refined the technology over the decades.

• In 2011, a Japanese company demonstrated a rudimentary system that created moving 3D images in mid-air with a series of rapidly-generated plasma dots. (see video below).

• Until now, jet aircraft had to eject ‘decoy flares’ to lure a heat-seeking missile away from targeted craft for only a few seconds. The Laser Induced Plasma Effects ionize an intense laser pulse to produce a burst of glowing plasma. These plasma bursts act as ‘flash-bang’ stun grenades to disrupt a heat-seeking missiles. A rapid series of such pluses can even be modulated to transmit a spoken message. (see video below) Because LIPFs conduct electricity, they have been investigated as a means of triggering lightning to create a ‘lightning gun’.

• Technology will no doubt evolve to allow heat-seeking missiles to distinguish the plasma ghosts from real jets, leading to further refinement of the decoy technology, and so on. Still, this laser-plasma research offers a game-changing method of providing aircraft and even larger targets protection from heat-seeking missiles. It may also provide a clue about the source of some recent UFO sightings by military aircraft.

[Editor’s Note]   These laser-induced plasma filament decoy shield can be expanded to protect a battleship, battle group, military base or entire city, according to its patent. I am reminded of the Tesla Shield patents that Dr Michael Salla wrote about in August 2019: “US Navy Regards Electromagnetic Propulsion & Tesla Shield Patents as Operable”, and “Are US Aircraft Carriers secretly protected by Electromagnetic “Tesla” Shields?”

I reached out to Dr Salla to see what he thought about the LIPF decoy shield. “This is a very interesting defense concept,” said Dr Salla. “Extension of current defense technology to throw off heat seeking missiles. Very different concept to the High Energy Electromagnetic Field Generator I discussed in the aircraft carrier refit article which effectively creates a Tesla shield. Possible that this is one of the new defense technologies used for the classified upgrades happening at naval dockyards. Don’t believe it’s related to the UFO videos released by the Navy.”

 

The U.S. Navy has patented technology to create mid-air images to fool infrared and other sensors. This builds on many years of laser-plasma research and offers a game-changing method of protecting aircraft from heat-seeking missiles. It may also provide a clue about the source of some recent UFO sightings by military aircraft.

The U.S. developed the first Sidewinder heat-seeking missile back in the 1950’s, and the latest AIM-9X version is still in frontline service around the world. This type of sensor works so well because hot jet engines exhausts shine out like beacons in the infrared, making them easy targets. Pilots under attack can eject decoy flares to lure a missile away from the launch aircraft, but these only provide a few seconds protection. More recently laser infrared countermeasures have been fielded which dazzle the infrared seeker.

A sufficiently intense laser pulse can ionize producing a burst of glowing plasma. The Laser Induced Plasma Effects program uses single plasma bursts as flash-bang stun grenades; a rapid series of such pluses can even be modulated to transmit a spoken message (video here). In 2011 Japanese company Burton Inc demonstrated a rudimentary system that created moving 3D images in mid-air with a series of rapidly-generated plasma dots (video here).

A more sophisticated approach uses an intense, ultra-short, self-focusing laser pulse to create a glowing filament or channel of plasma, an effect discovered in the 1990s. Known as laser-induced plasma filaments (LIPF) these can be created at some distance from the laser for tens or hundreds of meters. Because LIPFs conduct electricity, they have been investigated as a means of triggering lightning or creating a lightning gun.

One of the interesting things about LIPFs is that with suitable tuning they can emit light of any wavelength: visible, infrared, ultraviolet or even terahertz waves. This technology underlies the Navy project, which uses LIPFs to create phantom images with infrared emissions to fool heat-seeking missiles.

 

1:34 minutes video ‘Talking lasers and endless flashbangs: Pentagon develops plasma tech’ (‘Military Times’ YouTube)

 

1:53 minute video ‘True 3D Display in the Mid-Air Using Laser Plasma Technology’ (‘Deepak Gupta’ YouTube)

READ ENTIRE ARTICLE

 

FAIR USE NOTICE: This page contains copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. ExoNews.org distributes this material for the purpose of news reporting, educational research, comment and criticism, constituting Fair Use under 17 U.S.C § 107. Please contact the Editor at ExoNews with any copyright issue.

Copyright © 2019 Exopolitics Institute News Service. All Rights Reserved.