Space Force Graduates First Candidates of Space Intelligence Program

Article by 1st Lt. Tyler Whiting                                  July 23, 2020                                 (spaceforce.mil)

• June 23rd, the Space Force Intelligence Intern Program (SIIP) graduated its first two interns, Capt. Rebecca Bosworth and Capt. Devin Hightower (the two standing to the right in the photo above). The two graduating interns spent two years working alongside and learning from some of the most experienced intelligence personnel in the space community. The graduates then briefed Chief of Space Operations, General John “Jay” Raymond, his senior leadership, and the Assistant Deputy Chief of Staff, Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance for the U.S. Air Force.

• The Space Force Intelligence Intern Program was created in 2018 after recognizing there was no in-depth training for intelligence professionals to address the rising threats in the space domain. “The program itself went from inception to execution in less than five months,” said spokesperson Col. Suzy Streeter. “… and they surpassed all expectations. Both were game-changers for space operations and the intelligence community.”

• Intelligence support has historically been provided through small intelligence elements responsible for numerous programs. But the SIIP program interns were embedded directly with the team responsible for test and development of a new system, which improved their ability to provide intelligence support to the program. “The best advice is to be creative, always keep the problem in mind, and to always find a way over obstacles that will inevitably arise,” said Hightower.

• Both graduates will be assigned to the Space Security and Defense Program’s Threat Assessment Division, and have volunteered to join the US Space Force once the transfer window opens. “Originally we became a part of this program to develop ourselves into leaders to improve space intelligence in the Air Force. Now, we are helping to lay some of the groundwork for a new branch of the DoD,” said Hightower. “The best part of the transition to the USSF is that the vision is constantly evolving.”

• Two new interns will be added to the program each year. The program itself will continue to evolve based on feedback from graduating participants to improve and formalize intelligence support to space operations needed to ensure the U.S. continued superiority and ability fight and win in a conflict, should it extend to space.

 

PETERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. — The new U.S. Space Force Intelligence Intern Program graduated its first cohort on June 23, 2020, preparing them to succeed in future space intelligence leadership roles. The two graduating interns had an opportunity to out-brief the Chief of Space Operations, General John “Jay” Raymond, his senior leadership, and the Assistant Deputy Chief of Staff, Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance, headquarters U.S. Air Force.

The Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance Directorate at Headquarters, USSF (formerly Air Force Space Command) and the Deputy Chief of Staff for Intelligence, Surveillance, Reconnaissance and Cyber Effects Operations at Headquarters U.S. Air Force stood up the SIIP in July 2018, after recognizing there was no in-depth training for intelligence professionals to address the rising threats in the space domain.

The SIIP is designed to build a foundational knowledge of space intelligence for its participants. Interns spend two years working alongside and learning from some of the most experienced intelligence personnel in the space community.

The SIIP placed two company grade officers in its inaugural cohort: Capt. Rebecca Bosworth and Capt. Devin Hightower – in the Space Security and Defense Program’s Threat Assessment Division, where they worked on real-world, experiential projects concerning space threats, trends and how they affect U.S. space assets.

For two years, Bosworth and Hightower have been growing their experience as intelligence professionals in the space domain, improving the USSF’s ability to effectively integrate and action ISR data in support of the services mission to protect U.S. and allied interest in space.

“The program itself went from inception to execution in less than five months so there wasn’t much time to create expectations or structure,” said Col. Suzy Streeter, director of ISR at HQ, USSF. “Nonetheless, I had full confidence in their abilities to roll with whatever came their way and they surpassed all expectations. Both were game-changers for space operations and the intelligence community.”

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Are UAPs a THREAT? SOME OF THEM A THREAT? NO THREAT AT ALL?

UFO: Friend, Foe or Fantasy "CBS Reports" (1966) - YouTube
Come on, let’s try to think about these issues with greater granularity…or detail about the threat issue because we (all of us) tend to oversimplify and choose sides. I recently saw a video in which the anti threat + consciousness accepting position was stressed in excess, forgetting about the few negative interaction accounts in Ufology.
 
For what we seem to know out of decades of contact research and analyzing behavior, most are not an actual threat (technology + bad intentions or hostility against us). Some …a few are an actual threat, but they possibly are (for the most part) under a certain control or, according to some contactees (under an apparent agreement with a large confluence of several groups) not to exceed in their activities. There’s complexity here.
 
Our need to understand through over-simplification may be our own primary internal “enemy.”
Yes, there are SOME cases (a minority) that seem to be “negative.”
Depiction of a craft throwing a blood-suctioning beam on some individuals as was seen in Colares, Brazil, and thoroughly researched by the Brazilian Army.
 
Perhaps 6-9% according to the anonymous, international, FREE Foundation survey with more than 3,000 contact experiencer anonymous respondents and considering knowledge about a few verified hostile cases like the Colares case in Brazil (and what current cattle mutilations in Argentina and Skinwalker Ranch or other places might mean) relate to the actual threat that -according to some serious contact experiencers – are under control or functioning under some agreed-upon limitations.  
But we also need to find out who among “them” already is or can be our FRIENDS and ALLIES in spite of our current human frailties. And some serious contact experiences that have provided evidence over decades appear to show that specific varieties have respected us integrally during more than 40 years of interactions.
 
But since – among many of the movers and shakers – there is no direct knowledge about who is who among “them,” naturally, for any military, aviation, and national security evaluation team most have to be considered a “POTENTIAL” threat. However, whether we are supposed to depend on external protection forever or evolve in consciousness and – perhaps – not need external protection is an open question.
 
Moreover, as a species, we should be careful not to extend our own bellicose ways into space with nuclear weapons and especially directed against otherworldly civilizations in unfounded ways, without becoming part of a more inclusive exopolitical inter-world/inter reality agreement! At least not until we mature as a unified species worldwide that takes care of its planetary life and of its own members!
 
Thus, I can agree with Dr. Greer in some issues but not in his “all are benevolent,” absolutist stance. And I also agree about some issues with the ‘space brother’ crowd (in which I participate) that – in more recent times – has acquired a more balanced view in general. This means that (in spite of popular misconceptions) the entirety of this “crowd” doesn’t necessarily believe that “all are benevolent.” Again, we need to try to think with greater granularity and to… “CONNECT THE DOTS.”
UAPs: THREAT? SOME THREAT? NO THREAT?
We need to teach ourselves to overcome the habit of dichotomizing and over-simplifying things.  It is the tendency of our unprepared human minds to rely on fractional thinking, choosing the information that confirms our beliefs (cognitive bias), getting us into mutually distrusting identity groups based on our sacred partial beliefs and this doesn’t allow our species to move forward in understanding. But if we ‘grow up’ and enough of us reach a plateau of stable integrative values, thinking, activities (as oftentimes benign extraterrestrial entities tell “experiencers” that we are capable of doing), then we may be able to establish a reasonable degree of public open contact with the kindest types of non-human intelligent beings that we can choose. Through it, we may not just learn who is who among the intelligences behind the UFOs but also learn about the rules and principles governing a cosmic society probably waiting for us to join.  
What if besides the potential threat of an object that approaches our airplanes and some weird cases of cattle mutilation and a few deleterious cases there is some simple people that have been maintaining a close, friendly and mutually respectful relationship over decades of “working” good causes with benevolent extraterrestrials, like in the Amicizia case from Italy and some Mision Rahma groups or participants capable of working in a sincere ad rational way? Should contacteeism remain a taboo or become a possibility for learning about who is who among “them?”
 
To get a better handle on who is who in the non-human exopolitical community we also need to invest time in direct contact experience efforts and studies of the information bequeathed to us by persons that have allegedly experienced such contacts. And this includes remote viewing testimonies of vetted and credible former military viewers like former Sargeant Leonard E. Buchanan who mentions a whole variety of friendly and unfriendly psychic and non-psychic gray-type beings and other types of friendly and unfriendly ETs. This is after being asked to research the cases that project Blue Book had to admit as proven.
 
But is the only reason that the “threat” narrative is so much mentioned because it mobilizes politicians? Because it is sincere and natural to consider a “potential threat?” Because it is convenient either to lay the ground for a fake extraterrestrial invasion that would give more power to the powers that be? All of the above? Some of the above?
 
If we really find these issues important and care to find out, we really need to engage in a really serious COMPREHENSIVE study!

House Lawmakers Propose Navy Ranks for Space Force

Article by Oriana Pawlyk                                 July 21, 2020                                 (military.com)

• A House of Representatives amendment to the 2021 National Defense Authorization Act, as proposed by Rep. Dan Crenshaw, R-Texas, would have the Space Force adopt the Navy’s ranks and structure. On July 20th, the House approved the proposed amendment to the NDAA legislation, and the vote on the overall bill is pending.

• Todd Harrison, director of the Aerospace Security Project at the Center for Strategic & International Studies, said that “a good reason to use Navy ranks in the Space Force is to better distinguish [Space Force] personnel from Air Force personnel, kind of like [the Marine Corps] using different ranks than the Navy.”

• Retired Lt. Col. Peter Garretson said that a naval command structure would align with strategic similarities space operations have to laws of the sea. “In maritime theory, navies exist in order to secure commerce,” he said. The space domain has evolved beyond putting equipment in orbit to fostering free movement for commercial purposes, much like ocean shipping routes. Businessmen such as Jeff Bezos and Elon Musk are now monetizing the domain and even plan to create space colonies. “Once that happens,” said Garretson, “it starts to look a lot more like naval power.”

• Last month, Space Force announced how its personnel will be organized. The service will operate with three primary field commands: Space Operations Command which will support combatant commanders with Space Force personnel and capabilities; Space Systems Command which will acquire space systems from industry; and Space Training and Readiness Command which will be responsible for training space professionals.

• Other pending Space Force decisions include uniform updates, insignia and a logo design. Officials are also deciding what to call its members.

 

House lawmakers have signed off on a proposal calling for the military’s sixth branch to adopt the Navy’s ranks and structure.

             Todd Harrison

 

                  Rep. Dan Crenshaw

The amendment to the 2021 National Defense Authorization Act, proposed by Rep. Dan Crenshaw, R-Texas, would require the Space Force to use “the same system and rank structure as is used in the Navy,” according to a summary of the text. Crenshaw, a former Navy SEAL, medically retired as a lieutenant commander.

The House approved proposed amendments to the NDAA legislation in a 336-71 vote Monday; it is expected to vote on the overall bill this week.
“A good reason to use Navy ranks in the Space Force is to better distinguish [Space Force] personnel from Air Force personnel, kind of like [the Marine Corps] using different ranks than the Navy,” Todd Harrison, director of the Aerospace Security Project at the Center for Strategic & International Studies, said last week via Twitter.

Harrison had previously told Military.com that Gen. John “Jay” Raymond, head of the Space Force, getting the title of “chief of space operations” is similar to the Navy’s “chief of naval operations” role — hinting that the newest branch of the military could follow in the Navy’s footsteps.

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