NASA Planned to Leave Armstrong on Moon to Die if Mission Went Awry

Article by Tom Fish                                    July 20, 2020                                (express.co.uk)

• In 1962, President John F Kennedy called for a mission to the Moon, calling it a “new frontier”. On July 20, 1969, NASA astronaut Neil Armstrong realized this dream as he became the first man to set foot on the Moon, followed by pilot Buzz Aldrin 19 minutes later. As Armstrong famously proclaimed, “one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind”. Armstrong, Aldrin and the pilot, Michael Collins, returned to Earth as heroes.

• But what if the 1969 Moon mission was not a success? In his book Shoot For The Moon, author Jim Donovan revealed how NASA prepared for the worst-case scenario. “I discovered that the Moon landing was even more dangerous than anyone outside Mission Control knew,” writes Donovan. “When the primitive Apollo Guidance Computer – with just 72kB of memory and a processing speed millions of times slower than today’s average smartphone – began to blare alarms at 40,000ft it took incredible skill on the part of the controllers not to abort the entire mission.”

• There were 18 different plans in place if something went wrong. Collins kept a notebook with all 18 emergency procedures pinned to the front of his space suit. If something went wrong, Collins was ordered to leave Armstrong and Aldrin on the Moon to die. Writes Donovan, “Collins developed tics in both eyes at the thought of being unable to retrieve his two comrades and having to turn homeward and leave them on the Moon or circle it until they perished.”

• One the day of the actual mission, Collins said he was “sweating like a nervous bride” waited for Armstrong and Aldrin to get in touch. He believed if he had to return to Earth alone he would be a marked man for life.

• Knowing the risk of disaster, NASA had President Richard Nixon’s speechwriter, William Safire, prepare the words for such an eventuality: “Fate has ordained that the men who went to the Moon to explore in peace will stay on the Moon to rest in peace.”

 

       author, Jim Donovan

In 1962, President John F Kennedy called for a mission to the Moon. It was, he said, a “new frontier”. Talk of frontiers

was a throwback to the nineteenth century, but it made a certain sense.

Apollo 11 astronauts Neil Armstrong, Michael Collins and Buzz Aldrin

The prospect of claiming the Moon – vast, uninhabited, strategically useful and mineral-rich – is precisely the sort of thing the would have made the world conquerors of old salivate.

British arch-imperialist Cecil Rhodes once mused: “I would annex the planets if I could. I often think of that.”

NASA astronaut Neil Armstrong eventually realised this dream to some extent 51 years ago, on July 20, 1969.

He became the first man to set foot on the Moon, followed by pilot Buzz Aldrin 19 minutes later.

As he took his first steps on the lunar surface, Armstrong uttered the now immortal phrase “one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind”.

And after Armstrong, Aldrin and the pilot who had taken them to the lunar surface, Michael Collins, returned to Earth all three were given a hero’s welcome.

The mission was hailed a huge success – but it could have been very different.

READ ENTIRE ARTICLE

 

FAIR USE NOTICE: This page contains copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. ExoNews.org distributes this material for the purpose of news reporting, educational research, comment and criticism, constituting Fair Use under 17 U.S.C § 107. Please contact the Editor at ExoNews with any copyright issue.

NASA Awards SETI Institute Planetary Protection Support Contract

July 10, 2020                           (nasa.gov)

• Upcoming NASA science missions such as the Mars 2020 and Europa Clipper missions, and NASA’s Mars Sample Return mission, NASA’s Artemis program’s Gateway lunar orbital outpost, Human Lander System, and Commercial Lunar Payload Services initiative, all will need to be in compliance with planetary protection standards. ‘Planetary Protection’s’ role is to protect both Earth and mission destinations from biological contamination.

• NASA has awarded the SETI Institute in Mountain View, California, a $4.7 million ‘indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity’ contract for five years to head NASA’s Planetary Protection Program beginning July 1st. To ensure compliance with planetary protection standards, SETI (the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence). The SETI Institute will work with NASA’s Office of Planetary Protection to provide technical reviews and recommendations, validate biological cleanliness on flight projects, provide training for NASA and its partners, develop guidelines for implementation of NASA requirements, and disseminate information to stakeholders and the public.

• “The depth of mission experience and breadth of knowledge on the SETI Institute team will help NASA meet the technical challenges of assuring forward and backward planetary protection on the anticipated path of human exploration from the Moon to Mars,” said Lisa Pratt, NASA’s planetary protection officer at NASA Headquarters in Washington.

• “[P]lanetary protection [has become] an increasingly important component of mission planning and execution,” said Bill Diamond, president and chief executive officer of the SETI Institute. “We are proud to be NASA’s partner for this mission-critical function, protecting Earth from backward contamination, and helping ensure that the life we may find on other worlds, didn’t come from our own.”

• NASA and the SETI Institute have worked together on planetary protection for more than a decade and have developed a strong relationship and core competency in this area. SETI Institute scientists have extensive experience in understanding microbial life and how it can affect missions, even in the extreme conditions of spaceflight and extraterrestrial environments.

[Editor’s Note]   “SETI Institute scientists have extensive experience in understanding microbial life and how it can affect missions”? Really? Isn’t SETI the deep state pseudo-agency puppet that has been monitoring radio waves for signs of extraterrestrial signals since Frank Drake in 1960? Is this the same SETI who had to turn to private financing because of the ridicule they were taking from Congress? Now we learn that these astronomers who peer through telescopes all day, also have a knack for detecting microbial contamination on NASA spacecraft traveling to and from the Moon and Mars. The only thing that SETI has ever been tasked to do is to pretend to search for intelligent ETs and never find any, when everyone knows that they’re all around us and have been for the past century. Now, another deep state pseudo-agency puppet, NASA, is giving SETI the responsibility of preventing REAL microbial contamination in REAL space? Is this a joke? Or is it just a money transfer between two deep state toadies for some other agenda?

 

        SETI’s Bill Diamond

NASA has awarded the SETI Institute in Mountain View, California, a contract to support all phases of current and future planetary protection missions to ensure compliance with planetary protection standards.

The SETI Institute will work with NASA’s Office of Planetary Protection (OPP) to provide technical reviews and recommendations, validate biological cleanliness on flight projects, provide training for NASA and its partners, as well as develop guidelines for implementation of NASA requirements, and disseminate information to stakeholders and the public. The role of OPP is to promote responsible exploration of the solar system by protecting both Earth and mission destinations from biological contamination.

        NASA’s Lisa Pratt

“The depth of mission experience and breadth of knowledge on the SETI Institute team will help NASA meet the technical challenges of assuring forward and backward planetary protection on the anticipated path of human exploration from the Moon to Mars,” said Lisa Pratt, NASA’s planetary protection officer at NASA Headquarters in Washington.

Planetary protection preserves environments, as well as the science, ensuring verifiable scientific exploration for extraterrestrial life. Some of the upcoming NASA science missions that will be supported by this contract include the Mars 2020 and Europa Clipper missions, and preparations for NASA’s Mars Sample Return mission. In addition, future human spaceflight exploration under NASA’s Artemis program, such as the Gateway lunar orbital outpost, the Human Lander System, and Commercial Lunar Payload Services initiative, will be supported under this contract, as part of America’s Moon to Mars exploration approach.

The contract is a fixed-price indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract with a maximum award value of $4.7 million over a five-year period that began July 1.

READ ENTIRE ARTICLE

 

FAIR USE NOTICE: This page contains copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. ExoNews.org distributes this material for the purpose of news reporting, educational research, comment and criticism, constituting Fair Use under 17 U.S.C § 107. Please contact the Editor at ExoNews with any copyright issue.

Three Mars Launches This Month in Hope of Finding Alien Life

Article by Sean Martin                              July 7, 2020                              (express.co.uk)

• The United States, China and the United Arab Emirates all have Mars launches scheduled this month.

• Between July 20 and July 25th, the China National Space Agency will launch an orbiter known as Tianwen-1, which translates to ‘the quest for heavenly truth’ to circle the Red Planet for a year. The rocket will also carry a rover vehicle that will land on the Martian surface and collect soil samples. The oribter will serve as a communications relay for the lander.

• The UAE will launch an orbiter named ‘The Hope’, which will spend two years orbiting Mars. The UAE’s primary objective is to flex its financial muscle and show the world that it is capable of in space exploration.

• On July 30th, NASA will send the Perseverance Rover to roam the Red Planet looking for signs of life – both past and present. The main instrument, the ‘Scanning Habitable Environments with Raman & Luminescence for Organics & Chemicals’ (or ‘SHERLOC’), will be mounted on the end of one of the Mars rover’s robotic arms. SHERLOC will emit a quarter-sized ultraviolet laser at the ground, and scientists will measure how the light scatters when it hits the ground to determine its mineral and chemical compounds. This will identify the spectral “fingerprint” of certain alien organic material for signs of past or present life. “Life is clumpy,” said NASA’s Luther Beegle. “If we see organics clumping together on one part of a rock, it might be a sign that microbes thrived there in the past.”

• Earth and Mars are currently at their closest orbital points in the solar system. So now is the optimal time to make the relatively short journey – which will still take up to six months.

 

                   China’s Tianwen-1

THREE countries are set to launch rockets to Mars this months as the search for life on the Red Planet is turned up a notch.

          The UAE’s ‘The Hope’ orbiter

China, the US and the UAE are all gearing up for historic Mars launches this month with the hopes of discovering more about Earth’s dusty neighbour. Starting with China, the new space force will be launching an orbiter known as Tianwen-1, which translates to ‘the quest for heavenly truth’ to circle to Red Planet. The orbiter will spend a year around Mars, serving as a communication relay for humanity’s eventual arrival with the launch date scheduled between July 20 and July 25.

Alongside the orbiter, China will send a rover to roam the surface of the Red Planet and collect soil samples.

           NASA’s Perseverance Rover

China National Space Agency (CNSA) chief mission architect Zhang Rongqiao said: “Our goal is to explore and gather as much scientific data as possible.”

The UAE is also launching an orbiter named The Hope, which will spend two years orbiting Mars, following a 200-day journey.

According to The Hill, the UAE’s primary objective is to flex its financial muscle and show the world what it is capable of in the space exploration industry as the appeal of oil, which UAE has in abundance, loses its appeal.

READ ENTIRE ARTICLE

 

FAIR USE NOTICE: This page contains copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. ExoNews.org distributes this material for the purpose of news reporting, educational research, comment and criticism, constituting Fair Use under 17 U.S.C § 107. Please contact the Editor at ExoNews with any copyright issue.

Copyright © 2019 Exopolitics Institute News Service. All Rights Reserved.