What Does Foo Fighters Mean?

January 14, 2019                 (radiox.co.uk)

• Many people know “Foo Fighters” as the name of ex-Nirvana drummer Dave Grohl’s rock band. But where did the name come from?

• The term “foo fighter” was first coined by the US Army Air Force in World War II, as a term for strange phenomena sighted in the sky. In November 1944, pilots flying over Western Europe had spotted glowing objects flying quickly around the night sky – which were thought to be a new Nazi secret weapon.

• These objects were dubbed “foo-fighters” by a radar operator, Donald J. Meiers, who named them after a then-current comic strip called Smokey Stover. Smokey was a fireman, or “foo fighter”, who traveled to incidents in his “Foomobile”. The term was in common usage by the 1930’s, even showing up in a Daffy Duck cartoon.

• “Had I actually considered this to be a career, I probably would have called it something else, because it’s the stupidest fucking band name in the world,” said Grohl.

• Grohl has long been fascinated by the extraterrestrial phenomenon. In 1996, he and his then-wife Jennifer Youngblood made a brief cameo appearance in an episode of the X-Files tv show. (see video clip below)

[Editor’s Note]   Actually, there were accounts of American pilots seeing glowing “foo fighter” balls as early as the summer 1943 on a bombing run over industrial targets around Schweinfurt, Germany, which resulted in a disastrous loss of American planes and crew. Survivors secretly spoke of these ‘foo fighters’ assisting the Nazi Luftwaffe in their defensive attacks. Did Hitler’s extraterrestrial allies deploy these orb craft to help protect Germany’s industrial efforts to build a space fleet, which soon led to the Nazi’s relocating their spacecraft industry to Antarctica?

 

Foo Fighters – a name that’s synonymous around the world with heavy guitar anthems and the legend that is Dave Grohl. But why did Big Dave pick such an unusual name? What does “Foo Fighters” actually mean?

Back in the Nirvana days, Grohl had written and recorded songs but had kept them to himself as he considered Kurt Cobain to be the musical genius in the group. When Cobain died in April 1994, it looked like Dave would join another band as a superstar drummer, but the world was surprised when he came out of the studio with a whole album’s worth of his own songs, recorded pretty much by himself.

           Dave Grohl and the Foo Fighters

But Dave still wasn’t confident enough to release the music under his own name. He told Clash magazine in 2010: “Around the time that I recorded the first FF [demo] tape, I was reading a lot of books on UFOs. Not only is it a fascinating subject, but there’s a treasure trove of band names in those UFO books!”

“I had recorded the first record by myself, but I wanted people to think that it was a group, I figured that FOO FIGHTERS might lead people to believe that it was more than just one guy. Silly, huh?”

“Had I actually considered this to be a career, I probably would have called it something else, because it’s the stupidest fucking band name in the world.”

The term “foo fighter” was first coined by the US Air Force in World War II, as a term for strange phenomena sighted in the sky, before the term “unidentified flying objects” became a term. In November 1944, pilots flying over Western Europe had spotted glowing objects flying quickly around the night sky – which were thought to be a new German “secret weapon”.

Dave Grohl and wife in the background of the X-Files tv show – S3 E17

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Space Agency Reveals ‘We Can’t Hide Them’

by Callum Hoare                      January 12, 2019                        (express.co.uk)

• In 2017, leaked records showed the Pentagon ran a secret $22 million extraterrestrial “black project” after reports of an aircraft moving at “very high velocities that hovered with no apparent means of lift”.

• Still, the Assistant Director of Science for Communications at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), in Maryland near Washington D.C. , Michelle Thaller, (pictured above) insists the space agency knows nothing about extra-terrestrial life. She reasons that there is no way alien life could be covered-up, and it would be obvious if there was ever a threat to Earth. “We are just people and if we knew something, there is no way to hide it,” Thaller insists. “We have nothing to hide.”

• “I know this won’t convince conspiracy theorists, but one of the things I love most about our science is how accessible it is,” says Dr Thaller, a 49 year-old astronomer who studies binary stars and their life cycle “We are now trying to involve the public in more than we do.”

[Editor’s Note]   There appears to be a strict line between the NASA secret space program which works with the MIC SSP and the Air Force SSP to conduct operations in near space around the planet and the Moon, and the Public Relations NASA that is told nothing about the various secret space programs and their interactions with extraterrestrial beings so they can claim ignorance with plausible deniability. NASA and the Air Force still dodge the issue by using the standard lines that they’ve used since the 1940’s – that our government simply cannot keep a secret, and that ‘there is no extraterrestrial threat’. Well of course there is no threat because the ETs are working directly with our government. Dr Thaller is either being intentionally kept in the dark or is under strict orders to lie to the press and to the public about the hidden extraterrestrial presence here on Earth.

 

Conspiracy theorists have long believed NASA is involved in a cover-up surrounding alien activity due to the number of UFO sightings worldwide that go unexplained. In 2017, leaked records showed the Pentagon ran a secret $22million (£17million) extra-terrestrial “black project” after reports of an aircraft moving at “very high velocities that hovered with no apparent means of lift”. However, NASA’s Assistant Director Michelle Thaller insists the space agency knows nothing more about extra-terrestrial life than what it has shared with the public.

She revealed there is no way alien life could be covered-up and it would be obvious if there was ever a threat to Earth.

Dr Thaller told BigThink: “The day you see all the NASA scientists max out their credit cards and disappear, that is when you should worry.

“We are just people and if we knew something, there is no way to hide it.”

“Whenever we find something that is even slightly interesting we go to the government and the press about it – we have nothing to hide.”

“This is something that is really difficult, people think we are hiding aliens, but that shows the gap between scientists and the public.”

“We are now trying to involve the public in more than we do.”

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New History Channel Show Tells of Pilot’s 1948 ‘Dogfight’ With UFO Above Fargo

by Kim Hyatt                       January 9, 2019                      (westfargopioneer.com)

• The first episode of “Project Blue Book” premiered on the History Channel Tuesday, January 8th. It focuses on a 25-year-old National Guard lieutenant’s encounter with an UFO in the skies above Fargo, North Dakota.

• In October 1948, the local Fargo newspaper interviewed Lieutenant George Gorman, a B-25 fighter pilot in World War II. He told ‘The Forum’ that his “dogfight” with the UFO was “the weirdest experience I’ve had in my life.”

• The Fargo newspaper ran an account of the incident at the time. Flying at night in a P-51 over what is now North Dakota State University during a football game, Gorman saw a “flying disk”. It was round with well-defined edges, brilliantly lit and circling over the city. Gorman decided to investigate and a 27-minute chase ensued. Gorman tried crashing into it, but the disk dodged him at speeds of 600 mph. His P-51 aircraft’s top speed was 400 mph. As he approached the disk, it lit up and, with a burst of speed, outdistanced him.

• “Once, when the object was coming head on, I held my plane pointed right at it,” Gorman reported. “The object came so close that I involuntarily ducked my head because I thought a crash was inevitable. But the object zoomed over my head.”

• His story was corroborated by another pilot flying over Fargo that night, and two air traffic controllers to whom Gorman relayed information regarding the disk. Maj. D. C. Jones, commander of the 178th fighter squadron at Hector airport, said Gorman was so shaken by the experience that Gorman had difficulty landing that night.

• The Air Force investigated the incident through Project Blue Book, as depicted in the television show. According to the National Archives, there were more than 12,500 sightings reported to Project Blue Book in the 1950’s and 60’s, but the investigations officially found no evidence that UFOs were “extraterrestrial vehicles” or a security threat, including this one. Air Force investigators noted that Gorman was a credible, sincere witness “who was considerably puzzled by his experience and made no attempt to blow his story up.” But the Air Force ultimately ruled it an encounter with a weather balloon.

• According to ‘The Forum’ newspaper clippings from 1947 to 1995, UFO sightings were a dime a dozen back then. “A flurry of reports of unidentified flying objects were made in North Dakota,” says an article from August 1965. Countless columns aimed to disprove the sightings, claiming that “flying saucers aren’t for real,” said one article from August 1963. A March 1950 article tried to downplay the UFO hype, saying UFOs aren’t anything new and that, in fact, sightings in North Dakota dated back to 1897.

• Nevertheless, the Fargo-Moorhead area has welcomed “ufologists” for lectures over the years. Officials investigated reports made by children, adults and law enforcement alike.

• As for Gorman, he carried out his career in the Guard quietly, never again speaking publicly about his UFO experience. He denied Life magazine an interview in 1952. Gorman told friends that “he was never convinced that he had been dueling with a lighted balloon for 27 minutes.”

 

A new History Channel series exploring U.S. investigations into UFOs has a strong Fargo tie.

The first episode of “Project Blue Book” premiered Tuesday, Jan. 8. It focuses on a 25-year-old National Guard lieutenant’s encounter with an unidentified flying object in the skies above Fargo.

The lieutenant, George Gorman, a B-25 fighter pilot in World War II, told The Forum in October 1948 that the “dogfight” with the UFO was “the weirdest experience I’ve had in my life.”

              Lieutenant George Gorman

According to the archived Forum article: Flying in a P-51 over what is now North Dakota State University during a football game, Gorman saw the “flying disk,” according to the archived Forum article. It was round with well-defined edges, brilliantly lit and circling over the city.

After Gorman decided to investigate the disk, a 27-minute chase ensued in the Fargo night sky.

Gorman tried crashing into it, but the disk dodged him at speeds of 600 mph, he recalled. His aircraft was going at a top speed of 400 mph, and as he approached the disk, it lit up and, with a burst of speed, outdistanced him.

“Once, when the object was coming head on, I held my plane pointed right at it,” Gorman said. “The object came so close that I involuntarily ducked my head because I thought a crash was inevitable. But the object zoomed over my head.”

His story was corroborated by another pilot flying in Fargo that night and two air traffic controllers who Gorman relayed information to regarding the disk’s antics.

Maj. D. C. Jones, commander of the 178th fighter squadron at Hector airport, said Gorman was so shaken by the experience that Gorman had difficulty landing that night.

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