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Month: September 2020

Laser Weapons in Space Will Shoot Down Missiles

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Article by Kris Osborn                                    September 18, 2020                                   (nationalinterest.org)

• The space environment is highly conducive to laser weapons. Laser technology is being developed that carries a multitude of applications, particularly in space. The obvious application is space-based anti-missile laser weapons which can be used at “scalable” levels, ie: they can be used solely for detection and surveillance, or they can be gradually powered-up to stun, disable or destroy a target, or even to simply ‘jam’ enemy weapons or communications networks. A laser can be fired from an orbiting satellite to hit an inter-continental ballistic missile (ICBM) at different phases of the missile’s trajectory.

• Weapons developers are now working on “power-scaling” laser systems to engineer weapons strong enough to incinerate enemy missiles in space. This not only requires range but also power systems sufficient to generate the desired effects. The Pentagon is developing surface ship-fired lasers strong enough to travel out to the boundaries of the Earth’s atmosphere. Defense contractors are working on a new kind of unmanned ‘space drone’ able to travel beyond the Earth’s atmosphere for missile defense, surveillance or attack missions.

• Lasers travel more effectively beyond the earth’s atmosphere and experience less “beam attenuation” or weakening which can often happen due to weather or other obscurants operating closer to Earth. Also, lasers can attenuate at longer ranges, and many beams need to be consolidated into a single weapon to generate enough power to achieve the desired effect.

• A lesser known application is the use of lasers as optical sensors, according to experts with the Air Force Research Laboratory. “Lasers are super useful as optics in space. We view lasers as foundational to our space architecture,” says Colonel Eric Felt, Director, Air Force Research Laboratory Space Vehicles Directorate, Kirtland Air Force Base.

 

Space-based anti-missile laser weapons calls many military possibilities to mind. After all, there are already different lasers built, some more often

                     Colonel Eric Felt

discussed than others. For instance, is well known that lasers are being explored for intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) defense in space. Moreover, the Missile Defense Agency officials tell The National Interest that weapons developers are now working on “power-scaling” laser systems to engineer weapons strong enough to incinerate enemy missiles in space. This not only requires range but also power systems sufficient to generate the desired effects.

Where would they fire from? Well that is a fascinating question which is already receiving a lot of attention. Lasers could at some point fire directly from satellites to burn holes in ICBMs either in space, during a beginning boost phase or during the terminal phase as it is closing in on a target.

Also, the Pentagon is developing surface ship-fired lasers strong enough to travel out to the boundaries of the earth’s atmosphere. Engineers at firms like Booz Allen Hamilton are already doing conceptual work on the possibility of building new kinds of hardened, space drones or unmanned systems able to travel beyond the earth’s atmosphere for missile defense, surveillance or even attack missions.

Much work still needs to be done, yet initial efforts are beginning to show great promise, as many explain that the space environment is highly conducive to laser weapons. Lasers travel more effectively beyond the Earth’s atmosphere and experience less “beam attenuation” or weakening which can often happen due to weather or other obscurants operating closer to earth. Also, lasers can attenuate at longer ranges, and many beams need to be consolidated into a single weapon to generate enough power to achieve the desired effect.

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“The Phenomenon” Asks ‘Why Are UFOs Visiting Us? What Do They Want?’

Article by Susan Leighton September 17, 2020 (1428elm.com)

• October 6th will mark the digital release of the James Fox’ UFO documentary, The Phenomenon. Fox, who is known for a previous UFO related History Channel film, I Know What I Saw, brings out supporting evidence of UFOs from Biblical accounts to modern revelations brought forth by New York Times journalist Leslie Kean of the Pentagon’s AATIP UFO program, and the Navy’s cockpit video of the ‘Tic Tac’ and other types of UFO craft roaming around our skies.

• Narrated by veteran actor Peter Coyote and distributed on digital platforms by 1091 Media, The Phenomenon deals with the government’s ongoing efforts to cover-up the existence of UFOs with testimonies from “high-ranking government officials” including President Clinton, John Podesta and Senator Harry Reid. Audiences will have access to never-seen-before UFO footage.

• NASA rocket engineer, Josef Blumrich, constructed a blueprint of what the “wheel” spaceship depicted in the Old Testament’s Book of Ezekiel might have looked like based on the prophet’s account in the Scriptures. But if UFOs have been visiting us for thousands of years, what do they want? Why are they here?

 

The Phenomenon is a documentary from the mind of James Fox dealing with UFOs and the government’s ongoing efforts to cover-up their existence.

                          James Fox

Fox is well known for the History Channel film, I Know What I Saw, which featured detailed reports of alien crafts and investigations into the sightings by analysts and experts.

According to Deadline, veteran actor Peter Coyote, who appeared in Steven Spielberg’s, ET the Extra-Terrestrial, narrates the production. The Phenomenon contains testimonies from “high-ranking government officials” including President Clinton, John Podesta and Senator Harry Reid.

Audiences will have access to never seen before UFO footage. Also covered, the hard-hitting revelation of the Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification (AATIP) program in The New York Times by journalist Leslie Kean. The now famous declassified Navy fighter jet videos of the “Tic-Tac” and “Gimbal” incidences are mentioned, as well.

2:21 minute trailer for 1091’s “Phenomenon” the movie (‘1091 Pictures’ YouTube)

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The New Israeli-Arab Extraterrestrial Accords

Article by Sam Rutzick                             September 17, 2020                        (reason.com)

• The September 15th Middle Eastern ‘Abraham Accords’ formally normalized Israel’s relationship with both Bahrain and United Arab Emirates. As part of the accords, former rivals Israel and United Arab Emirates have agreed to cooperate in space exploration. In the accords, the signatories pledge a “common interest in establishing and developing mutually beneficial cooperation in the field of exploration and use of outer space for peaceful purposes,” which may include “joint programs, projects, and activities.”

• Both Israel and the United Arab Emirates have thriving space programs. The Israeli Space Agency has launched a number of satellites, including the Beresheet Lander sent to the Moon in 2019. Unfortunately, the lander crashed into the lunar surface due to a mechanical error. But the fact that the Israeli Space Agency was able to get that close is significant. The only other nations who have been able to get that close to the lunar surface are the Americans, the Chinese, and the Russians.

• The Emirati space program is also significant. Its Al-Amal (Arabic for “Hope”) satellite was launched in July and is expected reach Mars in February where it will monitor Martian weather patterns.

• On August 17, even before the Abraham Accords were signed, Israeli Minister of Science and Technology Izhar Shay said that cooperation was “imminent” and that “[t]he infrastructure is there for the commercial engagements for the sharing of know-how and mutual efforts.” The Israeli lander technology and the Emirates’ Mars shot could combine to culminate in a Mars landing. Emirati and Israeli astronauts plan to join the US on an Artemis moon mission, and the two nations may launch a joint mission to explore the dwarf planet Ceres.

• Clearly, space exploration is no longer the exclusive realm of the world’s superpowers. And whatever objections one might have to spending public dollars on space, scientific cooperation is certainly preferable to political rivalry.

 

                Al-Amal satellite

The new Middle Eastern accord quite literally reaches for the stars. As part of the deal, inked earlier this week, Israel and United Arab Emirates have committed to cooperate in space exploration.

The Abraham Accords, signed September 15, formally normalized Israel’s relationship with both Bahrain

                Izhar Shay

and United Arab Emirates. While geopolitical concerns have dominated both the substance of the accords and media coverage of the deal, the signatories also pledged a “common interest in establishing and developing mutually beneficial cooperation in the field of exploration and use of outer space for peaceful purposes,” which may include “joint programs, projects, and activities.”

Both Israel and the United Arab Emirates have thriving space programs. The Israeli Space Agency, founded in 1982, has launched a number of satellites—most notably, in 2019, the Beresheet Lander to the moon. Co-designed and built by the Israeli companies SpaceIL and Israeli Aerospace Industries, Beresheet was launched on a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket and made it all the way to the Moon for less than $100 million dollars.

Unfortunately, the Beresheet lander crashed into the lunar surface due to a mechanical error. Still, the fact that the Israeli Space Agency was able to get that close is significant. The only other nations who have been able to get that close to the lunar surface are the Americans, the Chinese, and the Russians.

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