Month: May 2020

‘Like Fourth of July’ Space Anomaly Seen by Buzz Aldrin from Apollo 11 Exposed

Pin It

Article by Callum Hoare                              May 19, 2020                            (express.co.uk)

• On July 20, 1969, Buzz Aldrin and Neil Armstrong became the first two men to walk on the lunar surface during NASA’s Apollo 11 mission. They and the Command Module pilot, Michael Collins, returned home to a hero’s welcome. But during the debrief, Buzz Aldrin spoke about ‘flashes of lights’ in the spacecraft’s cabin.

• During the Apollo 12 mission four months later, Alan Bean had a strange encounter while he was on the surface of the Moon. Said Bean, “I was on the backside of the Moon and looking down at a crater and I saw a flash… I thought ‘did I really see a flash?’ because there’s nothing going on down there.”

• Strange lights became a regular entry in Apollo mission logs. They appear more often on the way to the Moon rather than on the way back. Former NASA astronaut Dr Story Musgrave stated, “It’s like Fourth of July, the streak – they’re fireworks.” These strange occurrences went unsolved for years.

The Science Channel’s show: “NASA’s Unexplained Files”, says that NASA scientists solved the anomaly by having astronauts wear night vision goggles. The flashes still occurred exactly as the astronauts describe them. “NASA’s official explanation (was) that the lights are ‘cosmic rays’ – high energy particles ripping through space near the speed of light, bombarding the astronauts and their craft.”

 

On July 20, 1969, Buzz Aldrin and Neil Armstrong became the first two men to walk on the lunar surface during NASA’s Apollo 11 mission. Along with

                         Buzz Aldrin
           Alan Bean

Michael Collins – who orbited in the Command Module alone for 21 hours – the trio would mark a monumental moment in history by fulfilling John F. Kennedy’s goal of putting a man on the Moon by the end of the Sixties. But there was an event during that mission – and several more in the years that followed – that did not make the front-pages, and it involves a bizarre space anomaly spotted, the Science Channel’s ‘NASA’s Unexplained Files’ revealed.

The narrator said in 2014: “Astronauts often see things their instruments don’t pick up.

“The phenomenon caused a series of secret experiments, but could the explanation be out of this world?

“In 1969, the first men on the Moon returned to a hero’s welcome, but

           Story Musgrave

during the debrief, Buzz Aldrin talks about flashes of lights in the spacecraft’s cabin.

“Four months later, during the Apollo 12 mission, Alan Bean experiences a different strange encounter.”

Apollo 12 astronaut Alan Bean also described his first-hand experience while he was on the Moon.

He said: “The first time I saw them I was on the backside of the Moon and looking down at a crater and I saw a flash.

“I thought ‘did I really see a flash?’ because there’s nothing going on down there.”

 

READ ENTIRE ARTICLE

 

 

FAIR USE NOTICE: This page contains copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. ExoNews.org distributes this material for the purpose of news reporting, educational research, comment and criticism, constituting Fair Use under 17 U.S.C § 107. Please contact the Editor at ExoNews with any copyright issue.

Pin It

NASA Sets Out Its Red Lines for 2024 Moon Landing

Article by John Varge                                May 16, 2020                             (express.co.uk)

• The ‘Artemis Program’ is NASA’s project – supported by other international space programs and private companies – to establish a permanent human settlement on the Moon by 2028, beginning by landing two astronauts near the lunar south pole in 2024. On May 15th, NASA officials revealed the core values underpinning its mission in a document called the Artemis Accords (see here). NASA administrator Jim Bridenstine tweeted: “Today I’m honored to announce the #Artemis Accords agreements — establishing a shared vision and set of principles for all international partners that join in humanity’s return to the Moon. We go, together.”

• NASA said its over-riding vision was to “create a safe and transparent environment which facilitates exploration, science and commercial activities for all of humanity to enjoy.” This vision is in accordance with the “peaceful purposes only” principles enshrined in the Outer Space Treaty of 1967, the founding document of international space law, which has been ratified by more than 100 countries, including the US.

• The Accords seek to ensure no “harmful interference” by one nation in the off-Earth affairs of another, and to publicly disclose their exploration plans and policies as well as sharing their scientific data. Artemis partners pledge to protect historic sites and artefacts on the Moon and other cosmic locales, as well as to help minimize space-junk.

• Private Moon landers will begin to ferry NASA science and technology experiments to the lunar surface next year. The Accords also cover the space mining of resources on the Moon, Mars and asteroids conducted under the auspices of the Outer Space Treaty. Moon landers will be built by commercial companies such as Elon Musk’s SpaceX. SpaceX is currently developing its huge ‘Starship’ vehicle to help colonize Mars. Starship will launch atop a huge rocket called ‘Super Heavy’, but will land on, and launch off of, the Moon and Mars on its own. Other companies awarded contracts, worth a total of $967 million for 10 months of work, are Blue Origin and Dynetics.

• NASA’s Jim Bridenstine said, “This is the first time since the Apollo era that NASA has direct funding for a human landing system, and now we have companies on contract to do the work for the Artemis program.” “America is moving forward with the final step needed to land astronauts on the Moon by 2024,” including the first woman set foot on the lunar surface.

 

The US Space Agency has always recognised that international cooperation will be vital if its Artemis programme is to succeed. Artemis is the ambitious project to land two astronauts near the lunar south pole in 2024, as a precursor to establishing a permanent human lunar settlement by 2028. On Friday, NASA officials revealed the core values underpinning its mission in a document called the Artemis Accords, which stress the peaceful nature of its exploration.

In a tweet, NASA administrator Jim Bridenstine wrote: “It’s a new dawn for space exploration!

NASA’s Jim Bridenstine and SpaceX’s Elon Musk, doing his famous ‘Zoolander’ impression

“Today I’m honored to announce the #Artemis Accords agreements — establishing a shared vision and set of principles for all international partners that join in humanity’s return to the Moon.

“We go, together.”

In accordance with principles enshrined in the Outer Space Treaty of 1967, NASA said its over-riding vision was to “create a safe and transparent environment which facilitates exploration, science and commercial activities for all of humanity to enjoy.”

The outer Space Treaty (OST) is the founding document of international space law.

It has been ratified by more than 100 countries, including the United States and other leading space powers.

The OTS stipulates that space exploration should be carried out for peaceful purposes only.

Artemis partners will also be required to be completely transparent about their activities, which means publicly disclosing their exploration plans and policies as well as sharing their scientific data.

The Accords also cover space mining, which NASA sees as key to humanity’s exploration efforts over the long haul.

NASA officials said the ability to extract and use resources on the moon, Mars and even asteroids would be critical “to support safe and sustainable space exploration and development”.

READ ENTIRE ARTICLE

 

FAIR USE NOTICE: This page contains copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. ExoNews.org distributes this material for the purpose of news reporting, educational research, comment and criticism, constituting Fair Use under 17 U.S.C § 107. Please contact the Editor at ExoNews with any copyright issue.

Project Blue Book Looks for New Home After Cancellation

Article by Dan Selcke                              May 14, 2020                               (winteriscoming.net)

History (Channel) has announced that it will not be renewing the popular UFO series, Project Blue Book after two highly successful seasons. Project Blue Book is a drama based upon the US government’s real-life investigation into UFOs in the 1950s and 60s. The ratings for the show averaged 2.5 million per week, which is very good for a cable television drama.

Project Blue Book follows Dr. J. Allen Hynek, a real-life scientist who began work on the project as a UFO skeptic but then became a believer. Hynek is played by Game of Thrones veteran Aidan Gillen (Littlefinger). Hynek is paired with Captain Michael Quinn (Michael Malarkey), an amalgamation of several military figures from the story. The second season ended with Quinn missing, presumably at the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean.

• It seems that History wants to replace its scripted series, such as Project Blue Book, Knightfall (about the medieval Crusades), and Vikings, with several mini-series about US Presidents. The popular Vikings series is moving to Netflix. The creators of Project Blue Book have already outlined new shows for seasons 3 and 4, and are shopping the show to other outlets as well. “We feel it’s unfinished,” said Executive Producer David O’Leary. “[E]verybody involved remains committed to trying to find our show a second home, and to continue,”

Project Blue Book’s fan feel it’s unfinished as well. There’s a Change.org petition to save the show, and the creators are encouraging people to use the #SAVEBLUEBOOK hashtag on Twitter and Instagram to let networks know that there is interest. “[W]e want to thank the fans and say how grateful we are,” said showrunner Sean Jablonski. “Honestly, the greatest joy of the whole thing was just watching fans have these great [online] reactions to what we were hoping would be big, dramatic moments, whether it’s the Susie (Ksenia Solo) reveal, or somebody getting killed, or major plot turns that we were always trying to build.”

• Jablonski said that the show’s “characters are so great’; they’ve already laid out ten new episodes, and have the third season all planned out. So even if the show can’t find a new home on television, they will pursue a book, graphic novel, or even a mobile video platform such as Quibi. “[I]’d just be such a shame for our fans to not know where it’s going and where we can continue it to go because we’ve already done all that heavy lifting,” says O’Leary.

• “Obviously, we’re gonna bring Quinn back in early on,” Jablonski revealed. “He’s an integral part of the show.” The great thing about this show is that the subject matter and what it tackles is bigger than just writing a television script. We have the opportunity to tell great stories based on real-life stuff, and it’s still provocative today – 70 years later.

 

          David O’Leary

Last week, History announced that it wouldn’t be renewing any of its ongoing scripted series for new seasons, namely Knightfall — a medieval drama about the Crusades — and Project Blue Book, about the U.S. government’s real-life investigation into UFOs in the 1950s and 60s. The cancellation of Project Blue Book hit especially hard, because was actually doing pretty good in the ratings, averaging 1.3 million viewers a day after each new episode aired and 2.49 million a week after. Among cable dramas, that’s pretty respectable, and I imagine a show like Project Blue Book was less expensive to produce than something like Knightfall, at least.

So why the cancellation? Well, History seems to be pivoting towards more miniseries — it has at least three

             Sean Jablonski

miniseries about American presidents on the way — and is just doing away with all of its scripted shows; the popular Vikings ends this year, too, with the follow-up show going to Netflix. The good news is that the success of Project Blue Book gives the creators some leverage when shopping it around to other outlets. “We’re fortunate in that everybody involved remains committed to trying to find our show a second home, and to continue,” executive producer executive producer David O’Leary told SyFy Wire. “We feel it’s unfinished. And I’m sure our fans feel it’s unfinished.”

Indeed, the fans have been making their voices heard. There’s a Change.org petition to save the show up and running, and the creators are encouraging people to use the #SAVEBLUEBOOK hashtag on Twitter and Instagram to let networks know that there’s interest. “First and foremost, I think we want to thank the fans and say how grateful we are,” said showrunner Sean Jablonski. “Honestly, the greatest joy of the whole thing was just watching fans have these great [online] reactions to what we were hoping would be big, dramatic moments, whether it’s the Susie (Ksenia Solo) reveal, or somebody getting killed, or major plot turns that we were always trying to build.”

READ ENTIRE ARTICLE

 

FAIR USE NOTICE: This page contains copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. ExoNews.org distributes this material for the purpose of news reporting, educational research, comment and criticism, constituting Fair Use under 17 U.S.C § 107. Please contact the Editor at ExoNews with any copyright issue.

Copyright © 2019 Exopolitics Institute News Service. All Rights Reserved.